How Can We Grade Universities on Their Local Economic Impact?

Apr 18, 2014

Roosevelt Institute Associate Director of Networked Initiatives Alan Smith and NYU student Eugenia Kim explain the Campus Network's Rethinking Communities Initiative and how universities can promote local development. 

Roosevelt Institute Associate Director of Networked Initiatives Alan Smith and NYU student Eugenia Kim explain the Campus Network's Rethinking Communities Initiative and how universities can promote local development. 

Click here to read more about Rethinking Communities.

Share This

Mike Konczal on What's Next for Financial Reform

Feb 6, 2014

In a new episode of the Roosevelt Institute's video explainer series, "What's the Deal," Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal talks about what the Dodd-Fran

In a new episode of the Roosevelt Institute's video explainer series, "What's the Deal," Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal talks about what the Dodd-Frank financial reform law accomplished, what still needs to be done to change the system, and why there are reasons for reformers to be optimistic.

For more, check out An Unfinished Mission: Making Wall Street Work for Us, a report co-edited by Konczal.

Share This

Why Is Title X Important to the Success of the ACA?

Dec 2, 2013

As part of the Roosevelt Institute's "What's the Deal?" series, Fellow Andrea Flynn explains the importance of Title X in relation to the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA).

As part of the Roosevelt Institute's "What's the Deal?" series, Fellow Andrea Flynn explains the importance of Title X in relation to the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA).

Read Andrea's paper here.

Have an idea or topic suggestion for our "What's the Deal" series? Let us know by tweeting at #RIExplains and @RooseveltInst.

Share This

How Did the Great Recession Affect Millennial Views on Love?

Nov 8, 2013

As part of the Roosevelt Institute's "What's the Deal?" series, Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz explains how Millennials' view love and relationships after the Great Recession.

As part of the Roosevelt Institute's "What's the Deal?" series, Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz explains how Millennials' view love and relationships after the Great Recession.

For more on Nona's work, visit: http://www.rooseveltinstitute.org/nona-willis-aronowitz-news

To visit the Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline and learn about their network:http://www.rooseveltpipeline.org/

Have an idea or topic suggestion for our "What's the Deal" series? Let us know by tweeting at #RIExplains and @RooseveltInst.

Share This

What Are Three Steps to Solve the Jobs Emergency?

Oct 24, 2013

In a new installment of the Roosevelt Institute's "What's the Deal?" series, Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Jeff Madrick explains three steps the government could take to address the jobs emergency.

In a new installment of the Roosevelt Institute's "What's the Deal?" series, Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Jeff Madrick explains three steps the government could take to address the jobs emergency.

For more about the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative, visit rediscoveringgovernment.org.

Learn more about "What's the Deal?" by watching our teaser:

rooseveltinstitute.org/videos/sneak-peek-whats-deal

Send us topic ideas, suggestions, and questions by using #RIExplains.

Share This

How Will Millennials Reform Government?

Oct 8, 2013

In the first installment of the Roosevelt Institute's new "What's the Deal?" series, Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Field Strategist Joelle Gamble explains how young people are creating change in their local communities through the Campus Network and are designing a more effective government.

Learn more about the Campus Network by visiting:

http://www.rooseveltcampusnetwork.org

Read about the Campus Network's vision for 21st century government:

http://www.rooseveltcampusnetwork.org/govbyandfor

Share This

The FDR Library Counts Down to a New Deal for a New Generation

Mar 26, 2013

Last week, our partners at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, NY began their "100 Days" Countdown to the opening of their new permanent exhibits on June 30. This is the culmination of a full-scale renovation that began in May 2010, and the exhibits, which will bring the Roosevelt presidency to life through an interactive and immersive audio-visual experience, will be well worth the wait.

Last week, our partners at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, NY began their "100 Days" Countdown to the opening of their new permanent exhibits on June 30. This is the culmination of a full-scale renovation that began in May 2010, and the exhibits, which will bring the Roosevelt presidency to life through an interactive and immersive audio-visual experience, will be well worth the wait. Library Director Lynn Bassanese and Roosevelt Institute President and CEO Felicia Wong joined the WAMC Roundtable to mark the occasion and explain how the revamped Library will bring the New Deal to a New Generation.

Lynn notes that June 30 was chosen for the rededication "because on June 30, 1941, FDR opened his presidential library and museum for the first time to the public." She promises that "visitors will see a whole new museum," but one that maintains the vision and spirit of the library as designed by FDR himself. "The legacy of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt has never been so relevant as it is today," she says, "but there are fewer and fewer people who actually remember" them. A wide range of new exhibits will allow visitors to listen to Fireside Chats in an authentic 1930s kitchen or recreate FDR's secret White House map room, providing "access to that essential evidence that people need to understand what the Roosevelts did."

Felicia explains that the Roosevelt Institute supports the federally funded Library with additional resources for public outreach and education -- in this case, funding for the new exhibits. "Everybody loves FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt," Felicia says, "so in that sense, helping people to re-remember their importance to our culture today -- as Lynn often says, FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt built the world that we live in today -- the social contract that we still enjoy, the role that government plays, that's something that Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt really ushered in in the early part of the 20th century, so as long as we can remind people of that and remind them of the heroism that they embody, it's not that hard a sell."

Follow along with the countdown on Twitter with hashtag #NewDealNewGen, and mark your calendars for June 30.

 

Countdown from 100 image via Shutterstock.com.

Share This

Dorian Warren: We Need "National Voting Reform" if SCOTUS Decides Against Voting Rights Act

Feb 28, 2013

Antonin Scalia made his feelings on the Voting Rights Act, which took a beating during Supreme Court oral arguments this week, pretty clear, calling it a "perpetuation of

Antonin Scalia made his feelings on the Voting Rights Act, which took a beating during Supreme Court oral arguments this week, pretty clear, calling it a "perpetuation of racial entitlement." But as Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren explained on MSNBC's The Last Word, he's not alone -- nor is his line of thinking unique. Attacks on the Voting Rights Act are part of "a long-term, more than 30-year effort to chip away at most of the civil rights victories." Which is ironic, given that the arguments came on the same day the U.S. Capitol unveiled its new statue of Rosa Parks, "who led the Montgomery bus boycott in Alabama, the very state challenging the most significant and important civil rights victory of the movement," he said.





Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

The argument against the Voting Rights Act is basically that we've moved beyond racism, so targeting certain states for their histories of discrimination is out of line. But impulses to morph the law in ways that would discriminate against black people "have always been there, from the founding and especially through the '60s, until we had an effective legislation measure to deal with it," Dorian said. That's a lot of history to have already overcome.

So what do we do if the Supreme Court strikes down this law? There could be one upside. "In response we can then make a demand for some kind of national voting reform," he concluded. We'll have to wait and see.

Share This

Mike Konczal: How Would a Socialist Wall Street Work?

Jan 30, 2013

In the latest episode of the Roosevelt Institute's Bloggingheads series, Fireside Chats, Fellow Mike Konczal talks to Jacobin editor Seth Ackerman about Seth's recent article "

In the latest episode of the Roosevelt Institute's Bloggingheads series, Fireside Chats, Fellow Mike Konczal talks to Jacobin editor Seth Ackerman about Seth's recent article "The Red and the Black," which asks what kind of mechanisms would replace the pursuit of profit in a socialized economy. In the clip below, they discuss Seth's proposal for socializing the financial sector, transforming the heart of capitalism to give the public ownership over the means of production.

Mike summarizes the idea by noting that "if the government used eminent domain to purchase all the stocks" then "the public would run all the firms," allowing it to distribute the dividends of their success more equally throughout society. Critiquing the idea from a liberal perspective, Mike notes, "We don't tax wealth directly, but we tax the surplus that goes to corporations" and put it towards various public goods. If we want to create a more fair distribution of wealth, why not just do it through the tax code? Seth argues that this kind of "social democratic solution" attempts to mitigate the negative effects of capitalism but doesn't solve the underlying problems. 

For more, including how Seth's ideas apply to public education and what we can learn from past failures in both centrally planned and market economies, check out the full video below:

Share This

Susan Crawford: The U.S. Patent System is Stifling Innovation

Jan 3, 2013

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford appeared on MSNBC's Up with Chris Hayes last weekend to discuss the problem with patents in our modern intellectual property-based economy.

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford appeared on MSNBC's Up with Chris Hayes last weekend to discuss the problem with patents in our modern intellectual property-based economy. In the clip below, Susan explains that "the expensive, loony unreality" of many tech companies is that "all they're doing is inventing patents, not patenting inventions. It seems backwards, and it's actually frustrating for the inventors involved and for everybody."

On the growth of so-called "patent troll" litigation, Susan notes that there are two major problems: "One is that you could box out your competition with the threat of this lawsuit, but also you're making it very difficult for anybody else to invent something new... everybody's afraid, and that's no good for innovation." So what's the answer? Susan suggests that it's time to get really creative and "start over," eliminating software patents entirely. 

Captive Audience, Susan's new book on the telecom industry and its growing monopoly power, hits shelves January 8.

Share This

Pages