Daily Digest - September 10: Could a Left-Wing Tea Party Unite Progressives?

Sep 10, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Why We Need a Left Wing Tea Party (The Daily Beast)

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Why We Need a Left Wing Tea Party (The Daily Beast)

Sally Kohn calls on progressive factions to follow the Tea Party's lead and throw all their weight behind uncompromising candidates who are strong on every progressive issue.

Labor Market Unchanged According to July Job Openings Data (EPI)

Comparing job openings data to unemployment, Elise Gould points out that over half of the unemployed were not going to find work in July no matter what they did, because the jobs don't exist.

Government Debt Isn't the Problem—Private Debt Is (The Atlantic)

Richard Vague writes that financial crises can be tied to too-high and rapidly growing private debt, which means policy solutions need to focus on debt relief for low- and middle-income people.

Were Fast-Food Workers Paid to Strike and Protest? (The Guardian)

The answer is no, writes Jana Kasperkevic. That rumor is a corruption of the union strike fund, a pool set aside to help pay for striking workers' arrest fines and lost wages.

Warren Faults Banking Regulators for Lack of Criminal Prosecutions (WSJ)

While Senator Warren focused on the Federal Reserve, Senator Shelby blamed the DoJ for seeking fines instead of jail time for banking executives, report Ryan Tracy and Victoria McGrane.

Want to Fix the Jobs Crisis? Build a Federally Funded Worker Education Infrastructure (TAP)

Good job training programs – the kind that see both students and employers as clients – can be highly successful, writes Paul Osterman, but they're small and difficult to scale up.

The OECD’s Latest Report is Burdened by Economic Myths (AJAM)

Philip Pilkington says that until economic policymakers stop assuming that economies rebalance themselves and that high government debt is the real problem, good policy change is unlikely.

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Daily Digest - September 9: Block Grants Won't Solve Poverty -- They'll Make It Worse

Sep 9, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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The Republican Playbook for Cutting Anti-Poverty Programs (The Nation)

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The Republican Playbook for Cutting Anti-Poverty Programs (The Nation)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal and Bryce Covert write that block grants, like those that make up Paul Ryan's anti-poverty proposal, effectively freeze funding for their programs.

Can Republicans Be Convinced to Help Improve the Affordable Care Act? (TAP)

Looking at Mike Konczal's suggestion for improving the Affordable Care Act, Paul Waldman says that more specific proposals will force Republicans to act.

Democrats Have a Depth Problem. It’s Largely Their Own Fault. (WaPo)

Aaron Blake blames Democrats for not investing in developing young leaders, as the Republicans have done for 25 years, and credits groups like the Campus Network for starting to build that pipeline.

Ferguson Sets Broad Change for City Courts (NYT)

Frances Robles reports on the changes announced at Ferguson's first city council meeting since Mike Brown's death, including a cap on how much of the city's budget can come from court fines.

Dignity (New Yorker)

William Finnegan profiles one McDonalds employee on her work and her labor activism as she struggles to support her kids on $8.35 an hour, her wage after eight years on the job.

This Is What It's Like To Sit Through An Anti-Union Meeting At Work (HuffPo)

Dave Jamieson reports on recordings published by the Teamsters in which employers claim over and over that unions just want employees' money, not to improve the workplace.

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Daily Digest - September 8: What Ever Happened to the Public Option?

Sep 8, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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To Improve ‘Obamacare,’ Reconsider the Original House Bill (AJAM)

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To Improve ‘Obamacare,’ Reconsider the Original House Bill (AJAM)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that the House's public option for health care reform, which was missing from the Senate bill that became law, would greatly strengthen the Affordable Care Act.

SEC Faces Renewed Pressure to Consider a Corporate Disclosure Rule (The Nation)

One million comments submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission have called for requiring companies to disclose political donations to shareholders, writes Zoë Carpenter.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Holmberg finds that corporate political spending disclosure has substantial benefits.

Why the Worst Governments in America Are Local Governments (NY Mag)

Jonathan Chait looks at the problem of "Big Small Government," meaning local governments that act as oppressive forces. He says neither Democrats nor Republicans offer useful solutions.

Paid Sick Leave is Healthy for Business (SFGate)

Carl Guardino, a Silicon Valley CEO, explains the business advantages of instituting paid sick leave in California. He focuses on improvements to health, safety, and economic security.

Some Retail Workers Find Better Deals With Unions (NYT)

The retail union in New York City has secured protections for its members that other retail workers are fighting for, like plenty of advance notice on schedules, says Rachel Swarns.

Unemployment Rate Continues To Be Elevated Across the Board (Working Economics)

The combination of declining real wages and elevated unemployment rates for college graduates indicates the impossibility of a skills mismatch in today's labor market, writes Elise Gould.

Nearly a Quarter of Fortune 500 Companies Still Offer Pensions to New Hires (WaPo)

Since companies are scaling back the generosity of these pensions through hybrid plans that cost workers more, Jonnelle Marte says that number sounds deceptively good.

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New Piece on Where the ACA Should Go Next

Sep 5, 2014Mike Konczal

In light of the increasingly good news about the launch of the Affordable Care Act, I wanted to write about what experts think should be next on the health care front. Particularly with the implosion of the right-wing argument that there would be something like a death spiral, I wanted to flesh out what the left's critique would be at this point. Several people pointed me in the direction of the original bill that passed the House, the one that was abandoned after Scott Brown's upset victory in early 2010 in favor of passing the Senate bill, as a way forward.

Here's the piece. Hope you check it out.

Follow or contact the Rortybomb blog:
 
  

 

In light of the increasingly good news about the launch of the Affordable Care Act, I wanted to write about what experts think should be next on the health care front. Particularly with the implosion of the right-wing argument that there would be something like a death spiral, I wanted to flesh out what the left's critique would be at this point. Several people pointed me in the direction of the original bill that passed the House, the one that was abandoned after Scott Brown's upset victory in early 2010 in favor of passing the Senate bill, as a way forward.

Here's the piece. Hope you check it out.

Follow or contact the Rortybomb blog:
 
  

 

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Daily Digest - September 5: What Can Obama Learn from the Roosevelts?

Sep 5, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Roosevelts to the Rescue (NYT)

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Roosevelts to the Rescue (NYT)

In light of Ken Burns' upcoming documentary The Roosevelts: An Intimate History, Timothy Egan considers what President Obama could learn from the Roosevelts' lives and political challenges.

Cities Will Lead the Nation’s Technological Advances (FedScoop)

John Breeden II speaks with Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford about her new book, The Responsive City, co-authored with Stephen Goldsmith.

Fast Food Strikes Hit 150 US Cities (MSNBC)

The strikes expanded to include acts of civil disobedience, such as sit-ins outside restaurants, that led to arrests in five cities across the country, report Ned Resnikoff and Michele Richinick.

Economic Inequality Continued To Rise In The U.S. After The Great Recession (FiveThirtyEight)

Ben Casselman and Andrew Flowers present their initial takeaways from the Federal Reserve's triennial Survey of Consumer Finances, which confirms that the recovery was only for the wealthy.

Do Fast-Food Strikes Actually Work? (The Guardian)

Heidi Moore says that the labor movement is seeing greater support as fast food strikes grow and incorporate other low-wage workers seeking a living wage and a union.

What to Watch on Jobs Day: It’s No Longer a Jobless Recovery but It’s Undoubtedly a Wage-Growth-Less Recovery (Working Economics)

Josh Bivens and Elise Gould explain why wage growth has been so very slow in the recovery, and how lack of wage growth impacts other aspects of economic growth.

New on Next New Deal

Taxes Are Never Just a Class Issue

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Director Joelle Gamble argues that tax reform isn't the end-all solution to economic inequality, because it can't fix racial inequality.

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Taxes Are Never Just a Class Issue

Sep 4, 2014Joelle Gamble

Tax reforms can't solve all economic inequality, because they won't change the reality of race in the U.S. economy.

Tax reforms can't solve all economic inequality, because they won't change the reality of race in the U.S. economy.

The threat of corporate inversions to the American tax base sprung an interesting political dialogue around tax reform in the United States. We’ve seen debates on how to stop the spread of inversions and arguments that they aren’t a problem at all. Some call for the abolition of the corporate tax rate as a whole and others completely reject such suggestions. I find these discussions of tax reform and its effects on the economy informative yet simultaneously slightly disappointing.

What bothers me about how tax reform debates shake out is how absent they can become of socio-political realities, particularly the reality of race.

One line of progressive argumentation follows simply: If everyone pays their fair share of taxes, we can support public spending and job growth, and we’ll all do better. The argument firmly stands, but there is an important caveat.

It’s easy to harken back to the 1950s when tax rates were high, social services were relatively steady and economic security stretched across economic strata. But who was really secure then? Even the high points of job security for the American economy still left African Americans (and other racially marginalized groups) behind. This a structural phenomenon, instituted by socially racist institutions and a deep history of systemically harming the Black community.

We can’t take race out of conversations around economic inequality. The reality of race is that even fixes to the broader federal revenue landscape don’t always address the structural barriers of racism. A rising tide can’t lift all boats, if some boats are bolted to the seafloor.

Black unemployment consistently exceeds that of whites, both post-Recession and since such data has been available. Gaps between white unemployment and black unemployment shrank in 2009. This was not due to falling black unemployment but instead due to skyrocketing white unemployment.

This racial gap in economic success extends beyond the employment rate. In fact, it is deeply entrenched in the way wealth is distributed in the U.S. The gap between median Black wealth and median white wealth stands at about $236,000 dollars. Flagrant discrimination, in part, contributes to this gap. But it is perpetuated by generations of asset accumulation policies that are targeted at those who already own assets.

Corporate tax reform alone isn’t sufficient to fix the effects of decades of second-class status conferred on African Americans. The government does not just need sufficient funding to create equality within the economy. Distribution of these dollars is equally important. It needs to reflect the nuances of structural inequalities built into multiple aspects of our tax code.

Take federal housing spending policies as a prime example. Ending ineffective tax incentives, such as the mortgage interest reduction, can start to tilt the scales toward those who are not already wealthy. Seventy-seven percent of the benefits of the mortgage interest reduction accrued to homeowners with gross incomes of above $100,000. We need to rethink housing subsidies so that the benefits of federal programs do not heavily favor those who already own homes.

We need corporate tax reform to ensure that all participants in our economy are paying their fair share. But we also need a federal benefits structure that ensures that the concept of a "fair share" considers our history of discrimination when determining which Americans need those benefits most.

Joelle Gamble is the National Director of the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network.

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Daily Digest - September 4: On Corporate Boards, Local Stakeholders Protect Local Interests

Sep 4, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Fighting Corporate Inversion at the City Level (Next City)

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Fighting Corporate Inversion at the City Level (Next City)

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Director Joelle Gamble argues for linking tax exemptions to local stakeholder governance on corporate boards to increase corporations' ties to their communities.

Guards Need Job Security of Their Own, Say Apple Store Protesters (In These Times)

Julia Carrie Wong reports on a union protest last week that aimed to garner public attention around Apple's use of subcontracted security guards who receive low wages and few, if any, benefits.

The Education Department’s Problematic Billion-Dollar Partnership With Debt Collection Agencies (Buzzfeed)

The structure of the Education Department's contracts with debt collectors encourages abuse by paying less for services like income-based repayment plans, writes Molly Hensley-Clancy.

The Huge, Regressive Tax Break Right Under Your Roof (TNR)

Danny Vinik looks at a new study on the costs of homeowner tax deductions, which he says subsidize bigger houses and more debt instead of encouraging lower- and middle-income home ownership.

Three Ways That Politicians are Storing Up Disaster for Pensioners (AJAM)

David Cay Johnston explains smoothing, spiking, and starving, three strategies that ensure pensions will be underfunded and create disaster for retirees and taxpayers alike.

The Class War in American Politics is Over. The Rich Won. (Vox)

Nick Carnes, using examples from his book White Collar Government, explains how the wealthiest Americans' control of the political system impacts policy outcomes.

Unemployment Trickles Down to Poorer Workers, Study Finds (WSJ)

When higher-skilled workers take low-skill jobs, the trickle-down effects exasperate inequality, reports Pedro da Costa, according to new research from economists in Barcelona.

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Daily Digest - September 3: Soaring Inequality Isn't Inherent to the System

Sep 3, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Democracy in the Twenty-First Century (Project Syndicate)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Democracy in the Twenty-First Century (Project Syndicate)

Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz says that wealth inequality, thrown into the spotlight by Thomas Piketty, is the result of government-supported distortion of the market.

A Competition to Make the City More Resilient (Tech President)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford explains how the RISE:NYC contest was structured to ensure that it sparked sustainable and innovative ideas to protect the city from future storms.

How Amazon Plans to Storm Cable's Castle (Bloomberg View)

Susan Crawford suggests that Amazon's purchase of Twitch, a live-streaming video game platform, aims to increase its negotiating power with Internet service providers.

America’s Growing Food Inequality Problem (WaPo)

Researchers have found a growing dietary quality gap that parallels income inequality, says Roberto A. Ferdman. The study says the gap is partially cost-driven, since healthy food is pricier.

New Voter Guide Follows the Money (NYT)

Derek Willis looks at Crowdpac, a site that is creating a voter guide based on campaign finance data. Crowdpac argues that the source of campaign dollars says the most about a candidate.

It's Time to Raise the Minimum Wage. If Congress Would Rather Suck Up to the Koch Brothers, We'll Raise It Anyway (The Guardian)

Sarah Jaffe says that as long as politicians see wealthy donors instead of workers as their base, organizers must continue to take the wage issue out of legislators' hands.

Fast-Food-Worker Civil Disobedience? (Philadelphia Daily News)

Will Bunch reports on the planned acts of civil disobedience, including sit-ins and marches, that will represent a major escalation of the fast-food strikes tomorrow.

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Daily Digest - September 2: The U.S. Economy Needs Immigrant Workers to Thrive

Sep 2, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Just Who Did Build America? (Melissa Harris-Perry)

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Just Who Did Build America? (Melissa Harris-Perry)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren says that if the Republican Party is to survive, it needs to accept that immigrants continue to be key players in U.S. economic success.

Want Better, Smaller Government? Hire Another Million Federal Bureaucrats. (WaPo)

John J. Dilulio Jr. writes that the "Leviathan by proxy," the immense bureaucracies administered by state government, contractors, and nonprofits, just can't work as effectively as more federal hires.

What Happens When Health Plans Compete (NYT)

A new study shows that premiums drop when competition increases on the health insurance exchanges, writes Austin Frakt. He says the challenge is luring in those competitors.

What Would a Real ‘Right to Work’ Look Like? (Notes on a Theory)

David Kaib suggests two options for truly worker-friendly policies that could be attached to the name "right to work" instead of the anti-union free rider laws currently referred to as such.

Happy Labor Day. Are Unions Dead? (TNR)

Jonathan Cohn speaks to labor strategist and researcher Rich Yeselson about today's challenges for organized labor. Yeselson points out that union contracts don't stifle innovation; some companies just aren't innovating.

At Market Basket, the Benevolent Boss Is Back. Should We Cheer? (In These Times)

Julia Wong questions the labor-focused narrative of the recent Market Basket strikes. A manager-led strike doesn't guarantee that average workers will maintain their good wages and benefits.

Columbia University E-mail Reveals Disdain for Anti-Rape Campus Movement (The Nation)

George Joseph shares an email from the Columbia University Title IX compliance officer which demonstrates just how difficult it is for campus activists to be seen as equal partners.

  • Roosevelt Take: Campus Network members Hannah Zhang and Hayley Brundige have both called for student involvement in setting rape prevention policies on campus.

Fast Food Workers Plan Biggest U.S. Strike to Date Over Minimum Wage (The Guardian)

Thursday's strike will be the largest yet. Dominic Rushe ties the strike to lawsuits defining McDonalds as a joint employer with its franchisees, which would make unionizing easier.

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Daily Digest - August 29: A Rising Minimum Wage Lifts All Boats

Aug 29, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

There will not be a new Daily Digest on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day. The Daily Digest will return on Tuesday, September 2.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

Who Stands to Benefit from San Diego’s Minimum Wage Hike (Voice of San Diego)

There will not be a new Daily Digest on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day. The Daily Digest will return on Tuesday, September 2.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

Who Stands to Benefit from San Diego’s Minimum Wage Hike (Voice of San Diego)

Lisa Halverstadt speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt about her research team's estimate that 172,000 workers could get a raise from San Diego's minimum wage hike.

The Biggest Tax Scam Ever (Rolling Stone)

Tim Dickinson looks at the range of multinational tax avoidance strategies in use today, from inversions to offshoring. It's all legal, he says, but the law itself is broken.

De Blasio Zeroes in on Expanding Living Wage (Capital New York)

New York City's mayor looks to require more businesses, including retail tenants of subsidized developments, to pay a living wage, report Dana Rubinstein and Sally Goldenberg.

Market Basket's Popular CEO Arthur T Goes Rogue and Wins – Now What? (The Guardian)

After months of employee protests on his behalf, Market Basket's former CEO has bought out his cousins to regain control. Jana Kasperkevic says he'll face new challenges from shareholders.

AFL-CIO’s Trumka: Democrats Need New Economic Team in 2016 (WSJ)

The labor union president wants 2016 candidates to avoid economics advisors who have participated in the revolving door of government and Wall Street, reports Eric Morath.

Americans Foresee Unending Economic Doom (Vox)

Danielle Kurtzleben looks at a new study from Rutgers which shows that a growing number of Americans believe the last recession permanently scarred the economy and that government can't help.

Pregnant Women Just Earned More Workplace Rights in Illinois (The Nation)

The new law establishes civil rights protections for pregnant workers, which will help them to stay in the workplace if they want to, writes Michelle Chen.

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