Daily Digest - December 23: It's Hard to Trust in Systemic Economic Inequality

Dec 23, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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In No One We Trust (NYT)

Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that the behavior of banks leading up to the financial crisis and rising inequality have eroded Americans' trust in a fair economy. Stiglitz says that trust must be rebuilt through stronger regulations.

It’s Still Too Early for Congress to Stop Worrying About Unemployment (WaPo)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal looks at data that demonstrates that the labor market hasn't fully recovered from the financial crisis. Mike says that policymakers have moved on from unemployment despite the data, but that doesn't mean the crisis is over.

Is the Economy in Good Shape–or Not? (MSNBC)

Timothy Noah considers the theory that long-term news about the economy demonstrates "secular stagnation," which could mean that the recovery won't last or is weaker than expected. GDP growth should reveal whether the slow recovery is a short-term or long-term problem.

Deserving vs. Undeserving Poor — for the Love of God, Here We Go Again (Washington Monthly)

Kathleen Geier looks at recent discussion of poverty by policymakers, journalists, and researchers. She concludes that those who divide the poor into "good" and "bad" groups are ignoring the structural causes of poverty, which can be fought through existing anti-poverty programs.

Wall Street Unlocks Profits From Distress With Rental Revolution (Bloomberg News)

Heather Perlberg and John Gittelsohn report on the new hot market on Wall Street: rental homes, and corresponding securities. These investors' high cash bids beat out individual prospective homeowners, which is a problem when a house is a key way to build family wealth.

Goldman Real-Estate Play Skirts Volcker Ban (WSJ)

Craig Karmin and Justin Baer explain how Goldman Sachs is working around the Volcker rule's prohibition on banks owning more than 3 percent of a private equity portfolio. The rule doesn't apply to real estate, which creates an opening for highly concentrated and potentially risky investments.

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