Mike Konczal

Roosevelt Institute Fellow

Recent Posts by Mike Konczal

  • Live at Boston Review with a Forum on Debt Relief

    Nov 13, 2012Mike Konczal

    I'm live with a forum on debt relief at Boston Review. Here's my lead essay, along with responses from Jacob S. Hacker and Nathaniel Loewentheil, Dean Baker, Tamara Draut, Robert Hockett, Barbara Fried, Mark Calabria and more. My piece summarizes much of the work done at this blog over the past several years, especially focused on balance-sheet recessions, bankruptcy, implications of "you didn't build that," and the battle between debtors and creditors. The respones afterwards were very informative. (Plus, Fried is the author of one of my favorite books, so I was really psyched to see her participate.) I hope you check it out!

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    I'm live with a forum on debt relief at Boston Review. Here's my lead essay, along with responses from Jacob S. Hacker and Nathaniel Loewentheil, Dean Baker, Tamara Draut, Robert Hockett, Barbara Fried, Mark Calabria and more. My piece summarizes much of the work done at this blog over the past several years, especially focused on balance-sheet recessions, bankruptcy, implications of "you didn't build that," and the battle between debtors and creditors. The respones afterwards were very informative. (Plus, Fried is the author of one of my favorite books, so I was really psyched to see her participate.) I hope you check it out!

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  • Three Election Thoughts: The Failed All-In Repeal Strategy, Warren, and Three-Strikes

    Nov 7, 2012Mike Konczal

    The Consequences of the Conservative All-In Repeal Strategy: The attacks on Nate Silver have been fun to watch, but David Frum took the most heat for calling how this would all play out back in 2010. I really hope his Waterloo post, which made the case, will be on the radar of academics studying this era decades from now. Frum:

    The Consequences of the Conservative All-In Repeal Strategy: The attacks on Nate Silver have been fun to watch, but David Frum took the most heat for calling how this would all play out back in 2010. I really hope his Waterloo post, which made the case, will be on the radar of academics studying this era decades from now. Frum:

    Conservatives and Republicans today suffered their most crushing legislative defeat since the 1960s. It’s hard to exaggerate the magnitude of the disaster...Legislative majorities come and go. This healthcare bill is forever. A win in November is very poor compensation for this debacle now...No illusions please: This bill will not be repealed. Even if Republicans scored a 1994 style landslide in November, how many votes could we muster to re-open the “doughnut hole” and charge seniors more for prescription drugs? How many votes to re-allow insurers to rescind policies when they discover a pre-existing condition? How many votes to banish 25 year olds from their parents’ insurance coverage? And even if the votes were there – would President Obama sign such a repeal?

    What's interesting to me is how the conservative movement followed an "all-in repeal" strategy since summer 2010. The think tanks didn't prioritize the parts of Obamacare and Dodd-Frank that they wanted to see removed and replaced with something else, and political agents didn't try to force changes in exchange for concessions on other priorities.

    It was almost as if they didn't accept that the laws were the actual laws of the land. The major conservative think tanks all focused on either the unconstitutionality of the bills, hoping the Supreme Court would save them (this goes for Dodd-Frank as well), or wrote only in terms of repeal. During the primaries, every Republican presidential candidate promised to repeal Dodd-Frank and repeal Obamacare, and almost nobody said anything about what would go in their places. Romney famously was vague about how he'd replace Dodd-Frank and Obamacare. As such, there's been no signaling or mobilization on priorities for how conservatives should try to change these laws.

    Part of this is a function of how the movement has been mobilizing itself. If Obamacare is an Ayn Rand horror story of socialists nationalizing the health-care industry, well, 10 percent less socialist horror is still a nightmare. If Eric Cantor went and, say, offered Obama a debt ceiling raise or a second stimulus in exchange for putting the CFPB's budget under Congress's control or pulling back parts of Obamacare, he'd likely have his head ripped off by the base. This also might be because the conservative movement is out of ideas, something that has become painfully obvious in its responses to the Great Recession.

    But either way, Obamacare and Dodd-Frank will be here for a generation now.

    More Reasons to Celebrate Elizabeth Warren: Besides all the other reasons to be happy about Elizabeth Warren winning her Senate seat, there are two additional policy reasons to consider. Conservatives and lobbyists are focused on removing the CFPB's funding, single directorship, and sole focus on consumer financial protection. Republicans have explicitly stated that they'll block any director until these changes are made. Warren, who came up with the idea for the agency and fought for its creation, will understand how important the mission and the legal structure for how the agency is funded and organized are, and fight for that as well.

    Another important financial reform issue is that people are still nervous about how resolution authority, or the FDIC forcing a major financial firm to fail, will work in practice. Warren is one of the major experts on bankruptcy law -- she's the third most cited scholar on bankruptcy law in the country -- and also would like to see Too Big To Fail ended, so I believe she can work productively with FDIC to implement a resolution regime best capable of handling the problem.

    California Overwhlemingly Votes to Ease Three-Strikes Law, Other States Legalize Marijuana18 years after it was first passed, California looks to ease its three-strike law by a 20-point margin. When people study how the United States differs from the rest of the world in terms of incarceration policy and how we manage to have a significantly higher prison population than other countries, mandatory penalties for those who have a prior (recidivists) is a major driver.

    As the University of San Francisco School of Law’s Center for Law and Global Justice wrote in their report, “Cruel and Unusual: U.S. Sentencing Practices in a Global Context,” all of the major policy differences between the United States and other countries -- "life without the possibility of parole, 'three strikes' laws, consecutive sentences, mandatory minimums, juvenile justice laws, dual sovereignty, and non-retroactive application of ameliorative law" -- are all anti-rehabilitation policies.

    Let's go to the section of that report on three-strikes laws:

    The most infamous example of a stringent habitual offender law is California’s three strikes law, which provides a sentence of 25 years to life for anyone convicted of a felony who has committed two prior serious or violent offenses. While the public pushes for “the worst of the worst” to be taken off the streets, the reality is that most third strike convictions are for non-violent felonies: fifty-four percent of third strike commitments under California’s three strikes law were for drug, property, and other non-violent crimes...

    Virtually all of the countries surveyed for this report provided some type of increased penalty for recidivists. What distinguishes the United States from the rest of the world, however, is the lack of judicial discretion in sentencing schemes aimed at recidivists and the length of sentences that result...This leaves only 21% of countries, including the United States, that require a mandatory increased punishment for an offender with prior convictions.

    For fun, what are those other countries that also have three-strike like laws?

    Not the best company. Remember, these laws were designed to limit the power of judges and increase the power of prosecutors, a core part of the conservative assault on liberalism in the space of incarceration policy. This is a major change, likely to impact many other states for the better.

    Meanwhile, Colorado and Washington voted to legalized and regulate marijuana use. As of right now, Attorney General Eric Holder has not publicly stated if the Feds will try to interfere with these new laws, like they threatened to do to California's proposal (which failed to pass). President Obama and Holder have a real opportunity to let states experiment with ending the failed War on Drugs as we know it, or an opportunity to keep a moral crime going indefinitely by federal preemption. Nicole Flatow has an excellent overview of the legal issues at Think Progress.

     

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  • Election Day Non-Election Links

    Nov 6, 2012Mike Konczal

    Today is election day. Here's what I wrote about the stakes for Dodd-Frank and the election earlier this year at the Washington Monthly, with a quick update here.

    Here are some non-election links for you to check out in between obsessively refreshing all your favorite election sites:

    Today is election day. Here's what I wrote about the stakes for Dodd-Frank and the election earlier this year at the Washington Monthly, with a quick update here.

    Here are some non-election links for you to check out in between obsessively refreshing all your favorite election sites:

    Molly Knefel on contrasting her experiences teaching young black children under intense police scrunity with her brother, John, being arrested at an Occupy event.

    Sarah Jaffe on Occupy's afterlife in building community power in places devastated by Hurricane Sandy.

    Ben Adler on a 2010 MoMA exhibit on combating rising sea levels, revisiting what was discussed after having gone through Sandy. Also Matt Yglesias on using the Dutch as an example to save New York from future floodings.

    N+1 Election Preview. Ok, one election link. N+1 has a crew of fantastic writers, and it is great to get the take of intelligent people who don't cover/write about this stuff for a living.

    Jeremy Kessler on Justice Kennedy and civil liberties versus libertarianism. I'm going to do more with this shortly, but I really like the way he poses the problem of how do civil libertarians deal with the issue of public power. I (and many others) were caught off guard by the ACLU, etc. endorsed of Citizens United; Kesller approaches this issue through the Kennedy dissent on Obamacare.

    I covered the new unemployment numbers at The American Prospect last week.

    I went out looking for economics based arguments for anti-gouging laws. Three I found: Cheap Talk's Jeffrey C. Ely argues here that efficiency can be outweighed by excessive producer surplus, Andrew Bossie uses an island model here, and Jason Thomas here on tumblr makes additional points.

    I started a tumblr, and may keep it going. (I enjoyed having tumblr search my gmail for friends with tumblrs and seeing how many people started one about 18 months ago, posted 3 things, and then forgot about it.) Feel free to "ask me anything," especially if you need an election break, and I'll be happy to respond on the tumblr.

    Oh and one last time, the Herman Cain ad where his chief of staff, Mark Block, talks about the campaign and then has a smoke (and ends with Cain's smile). The Tea Party anthem, I Am America, gets stuck in my head immediately.

    See you on the other side....

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  • Mitt Romney, Reactionary Keynesian

    Nov 6, 2012Mike Konczal

    I meant to develop this into a larger work on the Right and economic stimulus but it never happened, and with the election today favoring President Obama, it is likely I won't get a chance. So here's part of it for the blog.

    I meant to develop this into a larger work on the Right and economic stimulus but it never happened, and with the election today favoring President Obama, it is likely I won't get a chance. So here's part of it for the blog.

    In December 2008 Mitt Romney wrote "A Republican Stimulus Plan" at the National Review, announcing "this is surely the time for economic stimulus." What should be in a Republican stimulus plan? First up, tax cuts. Tax cuts for capital income and corporations, and tax cuts overalls. But tax cuts aren't sufficient to the task, and some sort of direct spending will be required. However, since most infrastructure takes too long to get off the ground, "[s]pending to refurbish and modernize our military equipment is urgently needed, and it has a more immediate impact on the economy."

    In 2008 Mitt Romney wanted to stimulate the economy with tax cuts and military spending. It's worth noting that two of the central planks in Mitt Romney's currently underdeveloped economic policy are a series of tax cuts and a dramatic $2 trillion dollar increase in military spending. But don't call it stimulus! Mitt's National Defense Plan wants to "modernize and replace the aging inventories of the Air Force, Army, and Marines," as in the stimulus plan, but this is now to address "Obama's failure" in foreign policy.

    Mitt Romney's tax plan is meant to offset tax cuts by cutting tax expenditures. But the tax plan currently looks like an unassembled game of Mousetrap where you know several of the pieces are missing. It could work, but it isn't clear how it would. But even if Mitt Romney did offset his tax cuts by cutting expenditures, those expenditure cuts would likely be put into place over a period of years, years where the deficit would balloon further. (The Ryan Plan also balloons the deficit in the short term dramatically.) This would still work as stimulus.

    So Keynesianism through tax cuts and the military. The military stuff really does add to what John Kenneth Galbraith referred to as "a new and reactionary form of Keynesianism with which to contend" where "Tax reduction would then become a substitute for increased outlays on urgent social needs." Or as Michael Harrington wrote, in a 1966 Encounter article titled "Reactionary Keynesianism," "in the United States it is quite possible to envisage a conservative Keynesian policy which substitutes tax cuts for social investments, increases the maldistribution of income (the rich and the corporations gain more from tax cuts than the workers and the poor) and maintains a prosperity as that term would be defined by business."

    Liberals like to point out the contradiction of Republicans attacking economic stimulus while arguing that defense cuts will tank the economy, and they are right to do that. But I'm still having difficulty thinking through where the distributional impact of various ways of managing the economy, the type of society it builds, connects into the political ideology. I imagine we'll have more opportunities to see this in the aftermath of the election.

     

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  • Guest Post: Heather Boushey on Inequality and Growth

    Nov 6, 2012Mike Konczal

    Mike here: Special guest post by Heather Boushey of the Center for American Progress, responding to a recent citation of her work with Adam Hersh on inequality and growth (work we discussed here). The launch of this post was delayed on my end as a result of Sandy-induced work/email chaos.

    Mike here: Special guest post by Heather Boushey of the Center for American Progress, responding to a recent citation of her work with Adam Hersh on inequality and growth (work we discussed here). The launch of this post was delayed on my end as a result of Sandy-induced work/email chaos. Hope you check it out, as well as their excellent report that is discussed within.

    Inequality does appear to affect economic growth

    by Heather Boushey

    It is now a well-known fact that the United States has the highest levels of inequality among developed countries. Increasingly, the economics profession is questioning how this affects our economy, not only in terms of what it means for those at the bottom of the income distribution, but in terms of how high inequality affects economic growth and stability.

    The New York Times recently published a thoughtful piece on the relationship of rising U.S. inequality to long-term economic growth. In the wake of that article, they published a Room for Debate online forum on this topic and Scott Winship, a scholar a the Brooking’s Institution was among those participating. Mr. Winship cites our report on the topic to discuss what he argues is inadequate evidence linking inequality and growth.

    We are grateful that Mr. Winship acknowledges CAP's central role in this debate, but grossly mischaracterizes our conclusions. The quote he pulled from our report gives the false impression that our research supports the conclusionthat inequality is not a problem for economic growth.

    Our argument is that we need to look specifically at the channels through which inequality affects economic growth, specifically in the U.S. context. For example, there is evidence that documents how the rich don’t spend as much of their income as the non-rich. If inequality keeps rising and the rich pull in a larger and larger share of national income, this stunts demand, the lifeblood of the economy.

    Another mechanism is through entrepreneurship, which is often portrayed as the dynamic force in a capitalist economy. Yet, most entrepreneurs come from the middle class. The middle class provides both the economic security and access to education and credit that entrepreneursneed.

    If inequality is due to the top pulling far away from the rest of the economy,which creates a very wealthy elite, this is often associated with a well-known economic phenomenon of “rent-seeking.” The wealthy will tend to use their outsized resources to garner a bigger piece of the pie, rather than on investments that will increase productivity and make the whole pie bigger. And, there is growing evidence that this is exactly what is happening to our economy, threatening long-term growth. For example, economists have been finding that as money has flowed into the financial sector, that industry has increasingly used its resources to promote policies that benefit itself only.

    In opposition to Mr. Winship’s claim, the preponderance of evidence does supports the conclusion that inequality can hamper economic growth. We conducted a thorough review of the literature and in the quote he took, we were highlighting methodological limitations in a specific class of empirical studies. We also pointed out that cross-country panel data studies look at reduced form equations for growth and we argue that we should be thinking instead about a structural model.

    Others have found our report to be data-driven. Jim Tankersley, journalist with the National Journal encouraged his readers to consume the report “in its entirety,” describing is as a “The bulk of Boushey and Hersh's sources aren't partisan in any way - just detailed, data-driven analysis from top economists.” This blog called it “the best up-to-date arguments that progressives discussing inequality should understand inside out.” And in a lengthy discussion on the subject last month by Jared Bernstein, former chief economist to the vice president, our work was used to frame a summary of the latest research on this topic. 

    We are typically pleased to have our research cited in the paper of record, the New York Times. However, it is no fun to have our work grossly misrepresented.

     

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