A Platform to Build a New Deal for the 21st Century

Apr 13, 2012Felicia Wong

We're excited to announce the relaunch of our blog and continue the conversation about how to create a better society.

We at the Roosevelt Institute believe in a simple notion: ideas have power. Ideas shape almost every aspect of our daily lives: the work we do, the neighborhoods we live in, how we treat others and engage as citizens. I’ve experienced the ways Americans’ ideas inform how we organize our economy and our society firsthand. My Cantonese immigrant family was able to join the middle class in the U.S. thanks to American ideas about integrating many different kinds of people into one diverse community. It was also made possible because my parents attended the world-class public university system in California: my mother became a teacher and my father earned a PhD and went on to become an engineer. I also attended public schools funded by taxpayer dollars. All of our educations were made possible because of America’s ideas about how to afford basic opportunities to its citizens. Over my career, I’ve found job opportunities in both the public and private sectors because this country believes that both should thrive side by side. These are uniquely American experiences, shaped by our collective values and decisions.

But to make change and have an impact, ideas must take root.  They must get up and out.  This is especially true for the kinds of ideas that Roosevelt specializes in – ideas about the best ways to encourage growth and distribution by balancing a market economy with strong government – which can be specialized and detailed.  But academics and thinkers with new ideas about how our economy can work for everyone, how to create a more fair and just tax system, and how to discuss and promote a healthy vision for government in the 21st century must be able to reach wide audiences. Ideas have to resonate with elected officials who are responsible for crafting and writing laws, activists and advocates who knock on doors and distribute petitions for change, and families at their dinner tables or friends playing cards on a Friday evening.

Americans know that something is wrong, and they also know that it will take new ideas to improve their lives in these challenging times. The Great Recession has cost millions their jobs and livelihoods, and the recovery has felt so slow and painful for many, especially the worst off among us, that more children are living in poverty now than at any time since 1962. The middle class is being decimated by off-the-charts income inequality – we are now all the 99%. Yet our political system seems incapable of addressing the root causes of these crises, as it is so broken and co-opted that few Americans trust it to look out for them.

But this isn’t the first time the country has lived through these kinds of challenges. Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt faced down an economic catastrophe, a financial system run amok, a social safety net that barely existed, and increasing threats to democracy. They didn’t shrink from the challenge, and neither do we. What these times require are ideas and solutions that can make a difference. As FDR himself put it, we need “bold, persistent experimentation” to not just recover from the recent financial crisis, but to create policies that ensure a prosperous future that is shared by all. In short, we need a New Deal for the 21st century.

To get there, we need to change the civic conversation. That’s why we’re excited to re-launch our blog, Next New Deal, formerly New Deal 2.0. Over the past three years, our blog has featured unique insight and sharp analysis aimed at reanimating progressive thought. It has been a platform for the people, work, and ideas of the Roosevelt Institute and a way to share all that we do with a broad online audience. We have started conversations around questions such as how to combat poverty in an age of austerity and how to restore belief in the value of government. We’ve given progressive students and young professionals a platform to share their innovative ideas for tackling today’s greatest challenges. And we’ve brought Rooseveltian solutions to those challenges into the mainstream dialogue.

The improved reader experience on the redesigned blog will make these ideas more accessible and available than ever. We will continue exploring in depth solutions to our most intractable problems. Both established experts and emerging leaders will have dedicated spaces to share their ideas. Above all, we hope to use this blog as a laboratory of ideas, applying the work we do at the Roosevelt Institute to the most pressing problems of the day and pushing ourselves to develop and communicate bold, effective policy responses.

The years ahead will be challenging, and issues will likely arise that we can’t even anticipate. But using the blog as a launching point, the work of the Roosevelt Institute, and the discussion we cultivate in the broader progressive movement, can help us guide drive new ideas up and out – so that we can craft the next New Deal.

Felicia Wong is President and CEO of the Roosevelt Institute.

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