Daily Digest - April 1: When the Rents Come Due

Apr 1, 2013Tim Price

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How an anti-rentier agenda might bring liberals, conservatives together (WaPo)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal writes that left and right could find common ground in their efforts to stop the rich from extracting unearned income from land, copyrights, and other resources. Or they could just have a big fight about taxes, as per usual.

Lessons From a Comeback (NYT)

Paul Krugman notes that as California has drifted left over the years, Republicans have consistently predicted it would crumble under the strain of liberalism and sink into the Pacific. Now it looks like GOP obsolescence may be the key to a brighter future.

What if Sherrod Brown, Battler Against 'Too-Big-to-Fail' Banks, Gets Banking Committee Chair? (The Nation)

John Nichols writes that with current chair Tim Johnson set to retire in 2014, Democrats' internal politics could allow the populist Brown to take the reins. From there it's a slippery slope to effective regulation and decades of financial sector stability. Be afraid.

Why there won't be any big new bank laws in the US, in three quotes (Quartz)

Taking the under on bets that ending "too big to fail" is a foregone conclusion, Tim Fernholz argues that the White House has its hands full with Dodd-Frank and that House Republicans will likely continue to behave like a bunch of House Republicans.

Everyone's a Queen (TNR)

Timothy Noah notes that Republicans are victims of their own success with welfare reform, which forced them to expand the scope of what they want to cut. There must be swarthy moochers hiding somewhere, and the GOP won't rest until it finds them.

Social Security, Present and Future (NYT)

The New York Times editorial board argues that cuts to already meager benefits are the wrong way to reform Social Security and shouldn't be bolted to the side of an unrelated deficit debate. Who let in all the Unserious People? Jeeves, show them out.

What New York's (Partial) Victory on Paid Sick Days Means (Prospect)

Amy Traub writes that New York City is finally getting guaranteed paid sick days, and all it took was overwhelming public support, five long years of advocacy work, and compromises that exclude thousands in order to get the proposal brought to a vote.

284,000 College Graduates Had Minimum-Wage Jobs Last Year (HuffPo)

Student debt is soaring, the number of college grads stuck in minimum wage jobs has increased 70 percent over the last decade, and 38 percent of the class of 2010 hold jobs that don't even require a high school diploma. Future status: not won.

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