Tim Price

Deputy Editor

Recent Posts by Tim Price

  • Daily Digest - October 17: The False Prophets of the Invisible Hand

    Oct 17, 2014Tim Price

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    What Markets Will (NYT)

    Many economic analysts talk about the market as a kind of divine force, writes Paul Krugman, but they're only using it as an excuse to justify their own desire for more human sacrifice.

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    What Markets Will (NYT)

    Many economic analysts talk about the market as a kind of divine force, writes Paul Krugman, but they're only using it as an excuse to justify their own desire for more human sacrifice.

    AbbVie Board Ditches Planned $55 Billion Shire Acquisition (Reuters)

    The pharmaceutical company has abandoned plans to shift its tax base to the U.K., reports Ben Hirschler, because new rules make it harder to dodge U.S. taxes through such inversion schemes.

    How the Fed Is Trying to Fill in the Gaps of Monetary Policy (WaPo)

    Janet Yellen met with nonprofits and community developers in Chelsea, MA yesterday to discuss how Federal Reserve policy can better support working-class cities, reports Ylan Q. Mui.

    Even Red-State Voters Want to Raise the Minimum Wage (The Nation)

    Minimum wage increases will be on the ballot this fall in some states that lean heavily Republican, writes John Nichols, despite opposition from the top leadership of the party.

    $10.10 Minimum Wage Would Save The U.S. Government $7.6 Billion A Year (HuffPost)

    A new study from the Economic Policy Institute shows that a higher minimum wage would allow 1.7 million workers to stop relying on public assistance programs, reports Kevin Short.

    Companies Warn That Income Inequality Is Hurting Their Business (ThinkProgress)

    An analysis of corporate filings finds that many of the largest U.S. retail companies are concerned that their customers are not earning enough money to support sales, writes Alan Pyke.

    The Volcker Rule: How a Simple Idea to Rein In Banks Got Supersized (Bloomberg View)

    A straightforward proposal to ban proprietary trading has ballooned to hundreds of pages, leading some to call for the return of Glass-Steagall as an alternative, writes Yalman Onaran.

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  • Daily Digest - September 26: How to Fail at Prosecuting Banks Without Really Trying

    Sep 26, 2014Tim Price

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    The Blotch on Eric Holder's Record: Wall Street Accountability (The Nation)

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    The Blotch on Eric Holder's Record: Wall Street Accountability (The Nation)

    While the departing Attorney General would prefer to focus on his civil rights legacy, George Zornick notes how little Holder's Justice Department has done to punish the architects of the financial crisis.

    For Oil and Gas Companies, Rigging Seems to Involve Wages, Too (ProPublica)

    The Labor Department has identified hundreds of cases of oil and gas workers being cheated out of their earnings, writes Naveena Sadasivam, who also cites Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt.

    Coming Out at Work (Slate)

    Radical salary transparency promotes trust and cohesion in the workplace and makes it easier for employees to tell whether or not they're being treated fairly, writes Jordan Weissmann.

    How the 0.00003 Percent Lives (NY Mag)

    Annie Lowrey looks at a new study that reveals the typical billionaire to be an aging Wall Street banker and Ivy League patron who's planning to pass down his wealth to his children and grandchildren.

    The Show-Off Society (NYT)

    It's no use scolding the super-rich for flaunting what they have, writes Paul Krugman. Reducing inequality and bringing the privileged back down to earth is a policy choice we have to make.

    Quantifying Americans' Distrust of Corporations (The Atlantic)

    Surveys show that only 36 percent of Americans view corporations as a source of hope, whereas 84 percent of the Chinese public views them positively, reports Bourree Lam.

    New on Next New Deal

    What Ken Burns's Documentary About the Roosevelts Can Teach Us About Our Past and Ourselves

    Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow David Woolner, who was a historical adviser for The Roosevelts: An Intimate History, says the film shows how Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt saved free enterprise in the U.S.

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  • Daily Digest - September 25: Economic Progress Starts With Corporate Reform

    Sep 25, 2014Tim Price

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    America's Dark Economic Secret: How a Giant Gimmick Has Wages and Jobs Hanging by a Thread (Salon)

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    America's Dark Economic Secret: How a Giant Gimmick Has Wages and Jobs Hanging by a Thread (Salon)

    Tax-dodging techniques like inversions have turned all corporations into financial firms focused on moving their money around so that the government can't get to it, writes David Dayen.

    Germany's Major Export: Economic Optimism (WaPo)

    Corporate structures that balance the interests of shareholders and workers may explain why Germans feel better about their economy than other westerners, writes Harold Meyerson.

    • Roosevelt Take: Fellow Susan Holmberg and Mark Schmitt write about why we need to rethink the nature of corporations in Democracy Journal.

    The Rich Are Getting Richer, Part the Millionth (MoJo)

    The numbers don't lie, writes Kevin Drum: the rich have been soaking up a larger and larger share of economic expansions since the 1950s, including 95 percent of income growth since 2009.

    Yes, Tipping Sucks. But You Still Have to Do It. (The Nation)

    Pushing companies like Marriott to raise wages is a worthy cause, writes Bryce Covert, but refusing to tip will only hurt low-income workers, many of whom already live in poverty.

    17 Numbers That Will Make You Realize Just How Pathetic the Federal Minimum Wage Is (HuffPost)

    Claims that raising the minimum wage would destroy the economy sound even more dubious when considering how low it is and how many workers depend on it, notes Nick Wing.

    Miss a Payment? Good Luck Moving That Car (NYT)

    Michael Corkery and Jessica Silver-Greenberg report on the latest innovation in terrorizing debtors: devices that allow subprime auto lenders to track and remotely disable cars.

    New on Next New Deal

    Georgia Political Candidates: Where Are Carbon Emissions In Your Election Platform?

    A new EPA rule requires Georgia to reduce carbon emissions by 44 percent by 2040, writes Campus Network Senior Fellow Torre LaVelle, but the state's would-be leaders are ignoring the issue.

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  • In Defense of Public Service: Roosevelt Honors Commitment to Common Good

    Jul 14, 2014Tim Price

    Honorees at the 2014 FDR Distinguished Public Service Awards felt vindicated -- but why does public service need vindicating?

    Honorees at the 2014 FDR Distinguished Public Service Awards felt vindicated -- but why does public service need vindicating?

    Outside of election night victory speeches, it’s rare to see America’s elected officials express much happiness in public. In a political culture dominated by partisan rancor, personal attacks, and donor-friendly positioning, governing seems a joyless affair. Nor are the American people pleased with their leaders’ performance; polls reflect widespread dissatisfaction with all levels of government. So it was inspiring, refreshing, and a little surprising to see the sense of pride and achievement on display last Thursday evening in Washington as the Roosevelt Institute honored Vice President Joe Biden, Congressman George Miller, Senator Tom Harkin, and Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro at the 2014 FDR Distinguished Public Service Awards.

    Presented annually, the Distinguished Public Service Awards recognize and celebrate individuals who carry forward the spirit of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt by devoting their lives to the public good. During this year’s ceremony, the audience heard from the four honorees as well as presenters including Dr. Jill Biden, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, Senator Al Franken, and former Senator Christopher Dodd. The speakers reflected on the honorees’ long list of policy achievements, from fighting for higher wages and paid family leave to passing the Americans with Disabilities Act. There was a smattering of amusing anecdotes (Senator Harkin’s ’70s-era polyester suits were evidently considered both an electoral liability and a fire hazard). And everyone who stood at the podium found a way to talk about their distinct but deeply felt personal connections to the Roosevelt legacy. Above all, they seemed genuinely moved to be celebrated rather than insulted for their work.

    The most striking speech of the night was delivered by Vice President Biden. He received the Roosevelt Institute’s highest honor, the Freedom Medal, for promoting the vision of worldwide democracy and human rights that FDR famously expressed in his 1941 Four Freedoms Address. The Vice President spoke of his award as a “vindication” of a career spent in public service; and about his long-held belief that, setting aside their individual political views and policy preferences, all elected leaders got to be where they are because their constituents “saw something good in them,” and because they in turn wanted to do some good for their constituents.

    It’s a nice thought. In practice, there is plenty of cause for cynicism, especially in light of the flawed or absent policy response to the Great Recession and the ongoing crisis of inequality in the U.S. And when politicians do fail to uphold the public good, they should be held accountable. But there is also no doubt that a great deal of America’s anti-government culture, and of the political dysfunction that keeps government from working effectively, has been created and nurtured by right-wing ideologues who view government as a problem in and of itself. If public servants as a category are in need of vindication, it is largely because of this conservative effort to denigrate the very idea of working through government to achieve common goals.

    Thursday’s awards were a welcome reminder that not everyone has given in to this cynicism – that the term “career politician” can be an affirmation and not just an epithet. It was obvious from listening to these men and women speak that they have felt a powerful call to serve, and have made a leap of faith that progress is possible through long years of hard work and dedication. That was what Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt believed as well, and they proved it with bold and ambitious New Deal programs that built the American middle class from the ground up, reshaping the U.S. forever. By honoring those who continue their work today, maybe we can encourage all Americans to make that leap once again.

    Tim Price is the Communications Manager for the Roosevelt Institute.

    Photos: (Top) Congressman Miller, Congresswoman DeLauro, and Senator Harkin with Roosevelt Institute Board Chair Anna E. Roosevelt. (Bottom) Vice President Biden accepting his award accompanied by wife Jill. Credit: Crystal Vander Weit.

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  • Daily Digest - July 3: America's Workforce is Still Segregated After All These Years

    Jul 3, 2014Tim Price

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    On the Civil Rights Act's 50th, Workplaces Remain Segregated (Colorlines)

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    On the Civil Rights Act's 50th, Workplaces Remain Segregated (Colorlines)

    Though the Civil Rights Act brought legal segregation to an end decades ago, people of color are still being pushed into lower-paying occupations, writes Rinku Sen.

    • Roosevelt Take: A new infographic from the Roosevelt Institute's Future of Work initiative outlines five policy proposals that would promote an inclusive workforce.

    Domestic Care for Family Members Isn't Valued If Its Givers Are Exploited (Truthout)

    In a book excerpt, Sheila Bapat cites research from Roosevelt Fellow Annette Bernhardt and others to show how domestic workers are shut out from standard labor protections.

    We Know We Work Too Much. Now How Do We Stop It? (New Republic)

    Bryce Covert looks at paid leave and vacation laws, health care reform, work-sharing programs, and other potential statutory solutions to America's oversized workweek.

    Porsches, Potholes and Patriots (NYT)

    The Fourth of July should prompt a celebration of America's great public investments -- and an acknowledgment that they depended on taxes, writes Nicholas Kristof.

    Census: One-Quarter of Americans Now Live in "Poverty Areas" (Slate)

    Data from 2010 shows that a growing number of Americans live in areas where more than 20 percent of the population is below the poverty line, notes Jordan Weissmann.

    Yellen Drives Wedge Between Monetary Policy, Financial Bubbles (Reuters)

    Fed chair Janet Yellen says monetary policy is the wrong tool to curb financial risk, report Michael Flaherty and Howard Schneider. She sees no need to raise rates at present. 

    New on Next New Deal

    Graduated and Living With Your Parents? You May Be Luckier Than You Think.

    Millennials forced to move home may have their economic futures determined by where they were born, writes Roosevelt Campus Network Operations Director Lydia Bowers.

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