Tim Price

Deputy Editor

Recent Posts by Tim Price

  • Daily Digest - December 12: What Progressives Lost in the Cromnibus Showdown

    Dec 12, 2014Tim Price

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    Why D.C. Is Up in Arms About Derivatives... Again (Marketplace)

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    Why D.C. Is Up in Arms About Derivatives... Again (Marketplace)

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal tells Stan Alcorn that the financial regulation repealed in the budget deal had already been scaled back to include only the riskiest types of derivatives trading.

    What's Next for the Minimum Wage Movement? (MSNBC)

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren moderates a discussion about the grassroots political power that's pushing the minimum wage fight forward despite gridlock at the federal level.

    Why Elizabeth Warren Is Going to War With Obama Over Antonio Weiss (Vox)

    Senator Warren sees the President's pick for Undersecretary of Treasury for Domestic Finance as more evidence that the administration is too friendly to Wall Street, writes Matt Yglesias.

    Misreading the Lessons From Financial Crises (NYT)

    Alan Greenspan's response to the 1987 stock market crash trained both regulators and investors to expect the Fed to prop up markets instead of addressing the underlying problems, writes Floyd Norris.

    Banking Lobbyists Block Transparency Bill, Advocates Say (IBT)

    A bill to reform the Freedom of Information Act is stalled in the House, reports Matthew Cunningham-Cook, as Wall Street seeks to maintain a veil of secrecy about its deals with public agencies.

    New on Next New Deal

    The Budget Fight Was the First Skirmish in the War for the Soul of the Democratic Party

    Democrats had the leverage to block a deal that opens the door to more Wall Street bailouts, writes Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch, but instead they gave in to Republican blackmail.

    The Bipartisan Policy Center Gets It Wrong: The Lincoln Amendment Is Critical to Financial Reform

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal joins with The Other 98's Alexis Goldstein and Better Markets' Caitlin Kline to debunk the claim that the regulation repealed by the budget deal is redundant.

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  • Daily Digest - October 27: Wall Street Should Worry About Crossing the American Public

    Oct 27, 2014Tim Price

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    Pensions and Private Equity (NYT)

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    Pensions and Private Equity (NYT)

    In a letter to the editor, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Saqib Bhatti says public pension funds should use the leverage provided by their huge pools of capital to demand transparency from Wall Street firms.

    City Pays High Price for Interest Rate 'Deals' (Chicago Reporter)

    Experts like Saqib Bhatti and Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Brad Miller say banks misrepresented the risks of Chicago's interest rate swaps, and they've cost the city hundreds of millions, writes Curtis Black.

    Comcast: Broadband Battleground (FT)

    The merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable would create a monopoly on high-speed Internet comparable to 19th century railroad barons, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford tells Matthew Garrahan.

    25 European Banks Fail Stress Test (Reuters)

    A group of Europe's biggest banks had a collective capital shortfall of 25 billion euros in 2013, Laura Noonan and Eva Taylor report, which would put them at risk in the event of another economic shock.

    5 Ways America Is Failing Millennials -- And What to Do About It (Vox)

    Millennials face a unique set of public policy challenges, writes Reid Cramer, from their inability to find long-term employment and benefits to their distaste for hyper-partisan politics.

    Coalition of Immokalee Workers' Fair Food Label Makes National Debut (AP)

    The CIW, which received the Roosevelt Institute's Freedom from Want Medal in 2013, says the new label will identify tomatoes picked by workers who are paid a premium and afforded basic rights.

    Commission Greenlights Grocery Deliveries by Struggling Postal Service (WaPo)

    In a two-year trial for a potential nationwide program, the USPS will raise revenue by delivering groceries in San Francisco, despite concerns from private grocery-delivery services, writes Josh Hicks.

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  • Daily Digest - October 17: The False Prophets of the Invisible Hand

    Oct 17, 2014Tim Price

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    What Markets Will (NYT)

    Many economic analysts talk about the market as a kind of divine force, writes Paul Krugman, but they're only using it as an excuse to justify their own desire for more human sacrifice.

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    What Markets Will (NYT)

    Many economic analysts talk about the market as a kind of divine force, writes Paul Krugman, but they're only using it as an excuse to justify their own desire for more human sacrifice.

    AbbVie Board Ditches Planned $55 Billion Shire Acquisition (Reuters)

    The pharmaceutical company has abandoned plans to shift its tax base to the U.K., reports Ben Hirschler, because new rules make it harder to dodge U.S. taxes through such inversion schemes.

    How the Fed Is Trying to Fill in the Gaps of Monetary Policy (WaPo)

    Janet Yellen met with nonprofits and community developers in Chelsea, MA yesterday to discuss how Federal Reserve policy can better support working-class cities, reports Ylan Q. Mui.

    Even Red-State Voters Want to Raise the Minimum Wage (The Nation)

    Minimum wage increases will be on the ballot this fall in some states that lean heavily Republican, writes John Nichols, despite opposition from the top leadership of the party.

    $10.10 Minimum Wage Would Save The U.S. Government $7.6 Billion A Year (HuffPost)

    A new study from the Economic Policy Institute shows that a higher minimum wage would allow 1.7 million workers to stop relying on public assistance programs, reports Kevin Short.

    Companies Warn That Income Inequality Is Hurting Their Business (ThinkProgress)

    An analysis of corporate filings finds that many of the largest U.S. retail companies are concerned that their customers are not earning enough money to support sales, writes Alan Pyke.

    The Volcker Rule: How a Simple Idea to Rein In Banks Got Supersized (Bloomberg View)

    A straightforward proposal to ban proprietary trading has ballooned to hundreds of pages, leading some to call for the return of Glass-Steagall as an alternative, writes Yalman Onaran.

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  • Daily Digest - September 26: How to Fail at Prosecuting Banks Without Really Trying

    Sep 26, 2014Tim Price

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    The Blotch on Eric Holder's Record: Wall Street Accountability (The Nation)

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    The Blotch on Eric Holder's Record: Wall Street Accountability (The Nation)

    While the departing Attorney General would prefer to focus on his civil rights legacy, George Zornick notes how little Holder's Justice Department has done to punish the architects of the financial crisis.

    For Oil and Gas Companies, Rigging Seems to Involve Wages, Too (ProPublica)

    The Labor Department has identified hundreds of cases of oil and gas workers being cheated out of their earnings, writes Naveena Sadasivam, who also cites Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt.

    Coming Out at Work (Slate)

    Radical salary transparency promotes trust and cohesion in the workplace and makes it easier for employees to tell whether or not they're being treated fairly, writes Jordan Weissmann.

    How the 0.00003 Percent Lives (NY Mag)

    Annie Lowrey looks at a new study that reveals the typical billionaire to be an aging Wall Street banker and Ivy League patron who's planning to pass down his wealth to his children and grandchildren.

    The Show-Off Society (NYT)

    It's no use scolding the super-rich for flaunting what they have, writes Paul Krugman. Reducing inequality and bringing the privileged back down to earth is a policy choice we have to make.

    Quantifying Americans' Distrust of Corporations (The Atlantic)

    Surveys show that only 36 percent of Americans view corporations as a source of hope, whereas 84 percent of the Chinese public views them positively, reports Bourree Lam.

    New on Next New Deal

    What Ken Burns's Documentary About the Roosevelts Can Teach Us About Our Past and Ourselves

    Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow David Woolner, who was a historical adviser for The Roosevelts: An Intimate History, says the film shows how Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt saved free enterprise in the U.S.

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  • Daily Digest - September 25: Economic Progress Starts With Corporate Reform

    Sep 25, 2014Tim Price

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    America's Dark Economic Secret: How a Giant Gimmick Has Wages and Jobs Hanging by a Thread (Salon)

    Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

    America's Dark Economic Secret: How a Giant Gimmick Has Wages and Jobs Hanging by a Thread (Salon)

    Tax-dodging techniques like inversions have turned all corporations into financial firms focused on moving their money around so that the government can't get to it, writes David Dayen.

    Germany's Major Export: Economic Optimism (WaPo)

    Corporate structures that balance the interests of shareholders and workers may explain why Germans feel better about their economy than other westerners, writes Harold Meyerson.

    • Roosevelt Take: Fellow Susan Holmberg and Mark Schmitt write about why we need to rethink the nature of corporations in Democracy Journal.

    The Rich Are Getting Richer, Part the Millionth (MoJo)

    The numbers don't lie, writes Kevin Drum: the rich have been soaking up a larger and larger share of economic expansions since the 1950s, including 95 percent of income growth since 2009.

    Yes, Tipping Sucks. But You Still Have to Do It. (The Nation)

    Pushing companies like Marriott to raise wages is a worthy cause, writes Bryce Covert, but refusing to tip will only hurt low-income workers, many of whom already live in poverty.

    17 Numbers That Will Make You Realize Just How Pathetic the Federal Minimum Wage Is (HuffPost)

    Claims that raising the minimum wage would destroy the economy sound even more dubious when considering how low it is and how many workers depend on it, notes Nick Wing.

    Miss a Payment? Good Luck Moving That Car (NYT)

    Michael Corkery and Jessica Silver-Greenberg report on the latest innovation in terrorizing debtors: devices that allow subprime auto lenders to track and remotely disable cars.

    New on Next New Deal

    Georgia Political Candidates: Where Are Carbon Emissions In Your Election Platform?

    A new EPA rule requires Georgia to reduce carbon emissions by 44 percent by 2040, writes Campus Network Senior Fellow Torre LaVelle, but the state's would-be leaders are ignoring the issue.

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