Tim Price

Deputy Editor

Recent Posts by Tim Price

  • Daily Digest - May 2: What Piketty Tells Us About the Power of Big Thinkers

    May 2, 2014Tim Price

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    We Read Seven Thomas Piketty Think-Pieces For You (The Brian Lehrer Show)

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    We Read Seven Thomas Piketty Think-Pieces For You (The Brian Lehrer Show)

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal joins Brian Lehrer to explore some notable responses to Capital in the 21st Century, from the Financial Times to Esquire to Mike's own piece in the Boston Review.

    Poll: Americans feel system is 'stacked against' them (Now with Alex Wagner)

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren talks to Alex Wagner and Heather McGhee about the fight for a living wage, and notes that progressives are succeeding at the local level even when the federal government is unresponsive.

    The Tech Deficit & Living in Afghanistan (The Weekly Wonk Podcast)

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford, Fuzz Hogan, and Dan Tangherlini discuss the lack of tech expertise in the public sector and how to build a culture that makes government work more appealing. The segment begins at 12:24.

    Seattle Mayor Says He Struck a Deal for a $15 Minimum Wage (WaPo)

    The deal requires large businesses in the city to raise the minimum wage in three years, reports Niraj Chokshi, but allows small businesses seven years to comply. The City Council will take up the bill next week.

    • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute President and CEO Felicia Wong delivered the closing remarks at the mayor's recent symposium, where she said calls for a higher minimum wage were calls for democracy.

    Why Economics Failed (NYT)

    During the Great Recession and its aftermath, writes Paul Krugman, leaders ignored the textbook macroeconomics that could have restored full employment and prevented so much suffering.

    Can We Have More Jobs and Less Work? (In These Times)

    Jessica Stites speaks to progressive thinkers who call for seemingly opposite approaches to making life better for waged workers in today's economy: full employment, and less work with a universal basic income.

    Why Poverty Is Still Miserable, Even if Everybody Can Own an Awesome Television (Slate)

    Consumer goods like TVs and cell phones are cheaper than ever, writes Jordan Weissmann, but for low-income families, essentials like health care and education are getting further and further out of reach.

    New on Next New Deal

    Good News for Progressive Economics: Big Thinkers Like Piketty Are Back in Vogue

    Roosevelt Institute President and CEO Felicia Wong writes that Thomas Piketty's success is no fluke. He and other progressive thinkers have redefined the debate around inequality with the power of their ideas.

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  • Daily Digest - April 16: The Ideas Generation

    Apr 16, 2014Tim Price

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    That '70s Show, Starring Ted Cruz (New Republic)

    Despite conservatives' tendency to compare Barack Obama to Jimmy Carter, today's economic challenges are the opposite of those the U.S. faced in the 1970s, writes Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal.

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    That '70s Show, Starring Ted Cruz (New Republic)

    Despite conservatives' tendency to compare Barack Obama to Jimmy Carter, today's economic challenges are the opposite of those the U.S. faced in the 1970s, writes Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal.

    When Tax Refunds Aren't Just a Bonus, But a Lifeline (ThinkProgress)

    Twenty-eight million low-income families depend on the Earned Income Tax Credit to make ends meet, writes Bryce Covert, but not all poor parents qualify for it, and tax preparers' fees can hurt those who do.

    In Many Cities, Rent Is Rising Out of Reach of Middle Class (NYT)

    A new analysis finds 90 U.S. cities where the median rent excluding utilities is more than 30 percent of the median gross income, writes Shaila Dewan, and it's putting the squeeze on renters and the recovery.

    The Sad, Slow Death of America's Retail Workforce (The Atlantic)

    The retail sector's sales and jobs numbers are up, writes Derek Thompson, but as business becomes more efficient and moves online, the workforce is increasingly concentrated in low-paying superstore jobs.

    3 big things to look for in Yellen's first monetary policy speech (WaPo)

    Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen is likely to discuss labor market strength, inflation expectations, and the need for financial regulation in today's address to the Economic Club of New York, reports Ylan Q. Mui.

    New on Next New Deal

    Millennials Are Shifting the Public Debate with the Power of Their Ideas

    Taylor Jo Isenberg, the Roosevelt Institute's Vice President of Networks, introduces the Campus Network's 2014 10 Ideas journals, collecting top student policy proposals on economic development, health care, education, equal justice, energy and the environment, and defense and diplomacy.

    The Pay's the Thing: How America's CEOs Are Getting Rich Off Taxpayers

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow and Director of Research Susan Holmberg explains why we must close the CEO performance pay tax loophole in order to curb the rise of income inequality in the U.S.

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  • Daily Digest - April 15: What Makes Taxes Worth It?

    Apr 15, 2014Tim Price

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    Read My Lips: More New Taxes! (New Republic)

    Tax Day would be a time for celebration if there were a clearer connection between paying taxes and receiving the many valuable public services and benefits they fund, writes Jonathan Cohn.

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    Read My Lips: More New Taxes! (New Republic)

    Tax Day would be a time for celebration if there were a clearer connection between paying taxes and receiving the many valuable public services and benefits they fund, writes Jonathan Cohn.

    TurboTax Maker Linked to 'Grassroots' Campaign Against Free, Simple Tax Filing (ProPublica)

    Giving taxpayers the option to use pre-filled tax returns could save them money and time, but tax software developer Intuit is lobbying hard against the proposal, reports Liz Day. 

    Chances of Getting Audited by IRS Lowest in Years (AP)

    Deep budget cuts have put such a strain on IRS resources that the agency audited only 1 percent of individual returns last year, writes Stephen Ohlemacher, and that number will drop in 2014. 

    C.E.O. Pay Goes Up, Up and Away! (NYT)

    Despite efforts to restrain the growth of executive pay through increased transparency and regulation, median CEO compensation grew 9 percent in 2013, hitting $13.9 million, writes Joe Nocera.

    The Single Mother, Child Poverty Myth (Demos)

    Family composition in the U.S. is not much different from that of Northern Europe, writes Matt Bruenig, but the European countries have much more generous welfare systems to keep children out of poverty.

    What the French E-mail Meme Reveals About America's Runaway Culture of Work (The Nation)

    French workers are often mocked because they continue to fight for work-life balance, writes Michelle Chen, but American work culture's disregard for those boundaries is the real historical outlier.

    How 250 UPS Workers Fired for a Wildcat Strike Won Back Their Jobs (In These Times)

    An outcry from union members, activists, elected officials, and customers forced UPS to reverse its decision to fire hundreds of drivers at a Queens facility for protesting a co-worker's dismissal, reports Sarah Jaffe.

    New on Next New Deal

    What is Economic Growth Without Shared Prosperity? 

    Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Field Strategist Joelle Gamble argues that economic policy should focus on improving life for all Americans, not just those at the very top.

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  • Daily Digest - September 27: Haunted by the Ryan Budget

    Sep 27, 2013Tim Price

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    House GOP Debt-Ceiling Plan: Paul Ryan's Losing Ideas from 2012 (The Nation)

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    House GOP Debt-Ceiling Plan: Paul Ryan's Losing Ideas from 2012 (The Nation)

    John Nichols notes that the laundry list of demands that Republican leaders put forth for raising the debt ceiling looks suspiciously like the Romney/Ryan economic agenda that voters soundly rejected just last year, though even that might not be enough to placate the more radical members of their party.

    Poverty, Mobility, and Policy (On the Economy)

    Jared Bernstein points out that while Scandinavian countries do enjoy lower child poverty and more economic mobility than the U.S., it's not because the invisible hand of the market has a softer touch there. It's because those countries have decided to care about poverty and act to address it.

    Chart: 4 Reasons Why the White House's Domestic Worker Protections Matter (Mother Jones)

    Nina Liss-Schultz writes that the Obama administration's decision to extend federal labor protections to direct-care workers starting in 2015 will have a big impact on a fast-growing but poorly regulated industry full of jobs that have imposed a heavy financial burden on its largely female workforce.

    Five Reasons Food Stamps Work Just Fine (Prospect)

    Monica Potts makes the case that although SNAP is always at the top of the list when lawmakers look for ways to cut spending, the program is actually helping a lot of people -- especially children -- and boosting the economy without significantly contributing to the deficit or giving rise to any serious fraud.

    Plutocrats Feeling Persecuted (NYT)

    Paul Krugman writes that the last few years have been a great time to be wealthy, just like all the other times. But some seem to expect public adoration to come with all the money, and that has led them to invoke everything from Nazi Germany to the Jim Crow South to express the depths of their martyrdom.

    Looting the Pension Funds (Rolling Stone)

    Matt Taibbi argues that the "public pension crisis" in many states has been trumped up in order to lay the blame for economic and fiscal troubles on teachers, firefighters, and police officers while handing off their money to some of the very same Wall Street firms that are actually responsible for those problems.

    Economic Statecraft, Women and the Fed (NYT)

    Simon Johnson writes that economics and diplomacy have long been linked for the U.S., and the next frontier is to ensure that women around the world have full and equal ability to participate in the economy and be rewarded for their work. As Fed chair, Janet Yellen could serve as a homegrown role model.

    New on Next New Deal

    Inequality Broke the Economy. How Can We Fix It In New York City?

    Earlier this week, the Roosevelt Institute's Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative and Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline convened a panel of experts to discuss how the next mayor of New York City can address rising inequality. Nell Abernathy has the full video and event highlights.

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  • Daily Digest - September 6: Five Years of Fiscal Failure

    Sep 6, 2013Tim Price

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    Years of Tragic Waste (NYT)

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    Years of Tragic Waste (NYT)

    As the anniversary of the Lehman Brothers collapse approaches, Paul Krugman reflects on the federal goverment's abject failure to pump enough money into the economy to create the jobs Americans desperately need, either at the outset of the Great Recession or in the five years since.

    • Roosevelt Take: Check out the video and proceedings from our conference on the jobs emergency, presented by the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative, to see experts discuss how we can turn this policy around.

    Turnover at Federal Reserve adds uncertainty to interest rate and QE3 promises (WaPo)

    Ylan Q. Mui notes that while Ben Bernanke's departure and the search for his successor might be grabbing most of the attention, fully half the members of the Fed's policy committee could leave next year, which raises doubts about how much stock we can put in the agenda they've set.

    Want to Move Kids Out of Poverty? Then Protect the Middle Class (The Atlantic)

    Jordan Weissman looks at a new study that finds American children have a much better chance of being able to escape poverty when there's actually a large and healthy middle class around for them to escape into, though class segregation in major metro areas also plays an important role.

    A Map of Who's Got the Best (and Worst) Internet Connections in America (Gizmodo)

    Reuben Fischer-Baum writes that the data on relative Internet connection speeds show that Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford is right: there is a deep communications inequality in the U.S., and it seems to be driven not just by geography or population density but by income levels.

    24 Walmart Protesters Arrested at Demonstrations in New York and Los Angeles (HuffPo)

    Caroline Fairchild writes that several protesters who tried to deliver their demands for better pay to a Walmart board member were led away in handcuffs, but a company spokesperson insists that the protesters aren't real Walmart employees anyway, except for the ones who are.

    JPMorgan to stop making student loans (Reuters)

    David Henry reports that JPMorgan Chase will no longer be accepting applications to its already-restricted private student loan program as of mid-October, having decided there's no room for growth in the market now that it has to deal with direct federal lending and increased oversight.

    To Dodge Law, High-Cost Lender Offers Cash for Free (ProPublica)

    Paul Kiel notes that short-term, high-cost lenders in Texas are trying to get around new regulations on their shady business practices by offering borrowers zero-interest loans for nothing but the title to their car, and maybe something in the fine print about their firstborn. Don't worry about it.

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