Tim Price

Deputy Editor

Recent Posts by Tim Price

  • Daily Digest - July 3: America's Workforce is Still Segregated After All These Years

    Jul 3, 2014Tim Price

    Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

    On the Civil Rights Act's 50th, Workplaces Remain Segregated (Colorlines)

    Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

    On the Civil Rights Act's 50th, Workplaces Remain Segregated (Colorlines)

    Though the Civil Rights Act brought legal segregation to an end decades ago, people of color are still being pushed into lower-paying occupations, writes Rinku Sen.

    • Roosevelt Take: A new infographic from the Roosevelt Institute's Future of Work initiative outlines five policy proposals that would promote an inclusive workforce.

    Domestic Care for Family Members Isn't Valued If Its Givers Are Exploited (Truthout)

    In a book excerpt, Sheila Bapat cites research from Roosevelt Fellow Annette Bernhardt and others to show how domestic workers are shut out from standard labor protections.

    We Know We Work Too Much. Now How Do We Stop It? (New Republic)

    Bryce Covert looks at paid leave and vacation laws, health care reform, work-sharing programs, and other potential statutory solutions to America's oversized workweek.

    Porsches, Potholes and Patriots (NYT)

    The Fourth of July should prompt a celebration of America's great public investments -- and an acknowledgment that they depended on taxes, writes Nicholas Kristof.

    Census: One-Quarter of Americans Now Live in "Poverty Areas" (Slate)

    Data from 2010 shows that a growing number of Americans live in areas where more than 20 percent of the population is below the poverty line, notes Jordan Weissmann.

    Yellen Drives Wedge Between Monetary Policy, Financial Bubbles (Reuters)

    Fed chair Janet Yellen says monetary policy is the wrong tool to curb financial risk, report Michael Flaherty and Howard Schneider. She sees no need to raise rates at present. 

    New on Next New Deal

    Graduated and Living With Your Parents? You May Be Luckier Than You Think.

    Millennials forced to move home may have their economic futures determined by where they were born, writes Roosevelt Campus Network Operations Director Lydia Bowers.

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  • Daily Digest - July 2: Public Unions Meet the Conservative Guillotine

    Jul 2, 2014Tim Price

    Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

    The Wage War for Public Workers' Unions (MSNBC)

    Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

    The Wage War for Public Workers' Unions (MSNBC)

    Harris v. Quinn shows Supreme Court conservatives want to "weaponize the First Amendment" against public unions, says Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren.

    The Supreme Court Doesn't Care for Caregiving Workers (HuffPost)

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt writes that the Harris decision is just the latest example of how our public policy treats caregiving as second-class work.

    Are the Authoritarians Winning? (NYRB)

    Authoritarianism is gaining traction as democracies falter, writes Michael Ignatieff, but Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz's new white paper offers a comprehensive solution to the liberal state's fiscal crisis. (Note: This article is behind a paywall.)

    How Bad Policy is Making the Great Recession's Damage Permanent (WaPo)

    Austerity and low inflation are holding back productive capacity, writes Matt O'Brien, and unless they're willing to take more risks, some countries may never fully recover.

    5 Ways Wall Street Continues to Sandbag the Economy, and How to Fix It (Prospect)

    To set the economy back on track, Democrats must stop propping up the financial sector and undertake a massive public investment program, argues Robert Kuttner.

    Low-Wage Workers' Newest Ally Is a Washington Bureaucrat (The Nation)

    Zoe Carpenter talks to David Weil, the new director of the Labor Department's Wage and Hour division, about his plans to enforce and improve standards in the workplace.

    New on Next New Deal

    The Supreme Court's One-Two Punch Against Women's Health: McCullen and Hobby Lobby

    Rulings against the contraceptive mandate and buffer zone laws will create more barriers between women and basic health services, argues Roosevelt Fellow Andrea Flynn.

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  • Daily Digest - July 1: SCOTUS Rulings Increase Burden on Women and Workers

    Jul 1, 2014Tim Price

    Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

    Supreme Court Delivers a Win for Hobby Lobby and a Loss for US Women (The Hill)

    Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

    Supreme Court Delivers a Win for Hobby Lobby and a Loss for US Women (The Hill)

    The majority ruled that the contraceptive mandate was a burden on religious employers, but ignored the burden of women's health costs, writes Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn.

    The Best Way to Fix the Employer Mandate (The Hill)

    An additional payroll tax on employers who don't provide health coverage would help low-wage workers and raise revenue, argues Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch.

    Why is Washington Still Protecting the Secret Political Power of Corporations? (Guardian)

    The Securities and Exchange Commission could require corporations to disclose more of their political contributions, writes Alexis Goldstein, but it has proved reluctant to act.

    The $236,500 Hole in the American Dream (New Republic)

    The wealth gap between white and black Americans is growing, writes Dean Starkman, and closing it will take a major overhaul of housing policy and other asset-building strategies.

    A Grieving Father Pulls a Thread That Unravels Illegal Bank Deals (NYT)

    Jessica Silver-Greenberg and Ben Protess retrace the investigation that led to BNP being caught funneling money for Iran and Sudan and ultimately paying a record $8.9 billion penalty.

    New on Next New Deal

    SCOTUS Ruling Doesn't Gut Unions, But Creates New Challenges for Care Workers

    The Supreme Court's decision in Harris v. Quinn will make it harder for home care workers to organize for better pay and jobs, writes Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch.

    Money in Politics is a Local Problem, Too

    Rethinking Communities Brain Trust member Eugenia Kim writes that large donors have come to dominate even local politics, but communities have the power to resist them.

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  • Daily Digest - June 30: Inequality is a Choice We Can Stop Making

    Jun 30, 2014Tim Price

    Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

    Inequality Is Not Inevitable (NYT)

    Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that policies and politics have created America's economic divide, and only engaged citizens can fix it.

    Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

    Inequality Is Not Inevitable (NYT)

    Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that policies and politics have created America's economic divide, and only engaged citizens can fix it.

    • Roosevelt Take: For more on Stiglitz's plan to address inequality, read his Roosevelt Institute white paper on tax reform.

    How Cities Can Take on Big Cable (Bloomberg View)

    The Federal Communications Commission should preempt state laws that ban cities from building competitive fiber networks, writes Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford.

    Public Sector Unions Could Radically Change This Week (WaPo)

    Today's Supreme Court decision on Harris v. Quinn could seriously weaken public employee unions if their compulsory dues are ruled unconstitutional, notes Lydia DePillis.

    Will the Government Finally Regulate the Most Predatory Industry in America? (The Nation)

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is considering new rules to protect the 12 million Americans a year who rely on high-interest payday lenders, reports Zoe Carpenter.

    Why This Company Decided to Make Its Salaries Public to All Employees (Think Progress)

    The CEO of data analytics company SumAll tells Bryce Covert that increased pay transparency has led to greater productivity and trust and less stress over compensation.

    What Americans Think of the Poor (Prospect)

    A new Pew poll shows that even many conservatives who agree that "poor people have it easy" also believe the economic system is unfair, writes Paul Waldman.

    New on Next New Deal

    Summer Vacation is Feeding the Achievement Gap

    Students from low-income families face substantial setbacks without access to summer learning programs, write Roosevelt Institute Director of Operations Sarah Pfeifer Vandekerckhove and policy intern Candace Richardson.

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  • Daily Digest - May 2: What Piketty Tells Us About the Power of Big Thinkers

    May 2, 2014Tim Price

    Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

    We Read Seven Thomas Piketty Think-Pieces For You (The Brian Lehrer Show)

    Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

    We Read Seven Thomas Piketty Think-Pieces For You (The Brian Lehrer Show)

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal joins Brian Lehrer to explore some notable responses to Capital in the 21st Century, from the Financial Times to Esquire to Mike's own piece in the Boston Review.

    Poll: Americans feel system is 'stacked against' them (Now with Alex Wagner)

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren talks to Alex Wagner and Heather McGhee about the fight for a living wage, and notes that progressives are succeeding at the local level even when the federal government is unresponsive.

    The Tech Deficit & Living in Afghanistan (The Weekly Wonk Podcast)

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford, Fuzz Hogan, and Dan Tangherlini discuss the lack of tech expertise in the public sector and how to build a culture that makes government work more appealing. The segment begins at 12:24.

    Seattle Mayor Says He Struck a Deal for a $15 Minimum Wage (WaPo)

    The deal requires large businesses in the city to raise the minimum wage in three years, reports Niraj Chokshi, but allows small businesses seven years to comply. The City Council will take up the bill next week.

    • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute President and CEO Felicia Wong delivered the closing remarks at the mayor's recent symposium, where she said calls for a higher minimum wage were calls for democracy.

    Why Economics Failed (NYT)

    During the Great Recession and its aftermath, writes Paul Krugman, leaders ignored the textbook macroeconomics that could have restored full employment and prevented so much suffering.

    Can We Have More Jobs and Less Work? (In These Times)

    Jessica Stites speaks to progressive thinkers who call for seemingly opposite approaches to making life better for waged workers in today's economy: full employment, and less work with a universal basic income.

    Why Poverty Is Still Miserable, Even if Everybody Can Own an Awesome Television (Slate)

    Consumer goods like TVs and cell phones are cheaper than ever, writes Jordan Weissmann, but for low-income families, essentials like health care and education are getting further and further out of reach.

    New on Next New Deal

    Good News for Progressive Economics: Big Thinkers Like Piketty Are Back in Vogue

    Roosevelt Institute President and CEO Felicia Wong writes that Thomas Piketty's success is no fluke. He and other progressive thinkers have redefined the debate around inequality with the power of their ideas.

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