Tim Price

Deputy Editor

Recent Posts by Tim Price

  • Daily Digest - March 28: The Economy Rots from the Head Down

    Mar 28, 2013Tim Price

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    The Consequences of a Leaderless Economy (Yahoo! Finance)

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    The Consequences of a Leaderless Economy (Yahoo! Finance)

    Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Rob Johnson argues that America's failure to lead and China and Germany's resistance to change has left the global economy with a void at the top, though many in the financial sector consider themselves god-emperor.

    Dissolving the Digital Divide (Impatient Optimists)

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford writes that we need regulation and competition in the telecom industry to close the gap between Americans with fast and affordable Internet access and those stuck squinting at a download bar that will never fill up.

    'Trickle-down consumption': How rising inequality can leave everyone worse off (WaPo)

    Brad Plumer highlights a new paper from researchers at the University of Chicago that shows growing wealth at the top is driving everyone else deeper into debt in an attempt to keep up. Even jogging in place is tough when the treadmill keeps getting faster.

    Wealthy Say Higher Taxes Haven't Hurt Spending, Investing (CNBC)

    Many conservatives predicted the skies would tear open and rain cleansing fire on us all if taxes were raised for anyone making over $250K, but most top earners are reacting to higher rates with a shrug. And the Republican Party was never heard from again.

    Is tax reform the new "repeal and replace"? (WaPo)

    Jonathan Bernstein suspects that like the Republican alternative to health care reform that somehow failed to materialize despite 30-odd attempts to repeal the existing law, the GOP's promised version of comprehensive tax reform will turn out to be vaporware.

    What Is the Fiscal Impact of Gay Marriage? (Bloomberg)

    Josh Barro notes that research has shown legalizing same-sex marriage is likely to have a small but positive fiscal impact as spouses support each other financially, making it perhaps the one cost-cutting measure Republicans don't want to impose on the poor.

    JPMorgan Chase Faces Full-Court Press of Federal Investigations (NYT)

    Jessica Silver-Greenberg and Ben Protess report that regulators are devoting a lot of attention to JPMorgan, and in the wake of the London Whale, foreclosure fraud, and Bernie Madoff, those slots on their calendars aren't just being held for cocktails anymore.

    It's dumb not to fill your company's board with women (Quartz)

    Ritchie King notes that only one out of ten corporate board members are women, but their presence correlates with higher share prices, stronger returns, and less risk of bankruptcy. Maybe decision making is easier when you're not pretending it's 1950.

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  • Daily Digest - March 27: The Predator State Becomes the Prey

    Mar 27, 2013Tim Price

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    The corporate 'predator state' (WaPo)

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    The corporate 'predator state' (WaPo)

    Katrina vanden Heuvel argues that bipartisan agreement in Washington often means corporate interests have successfully bought off lawmakers on both sides, but there's a real left-right alliance to be forged between workers and small business owners.

    For 'Faster Growth,' Soak the Poor? (Bloomberg)

    Josh Barro writes that conservative economists are once again trotting out the argument that we need to cut government spending on poor people in order to fix the economy, which makes sense if you ignore everything about the economy and the poor.

    Why the federal budget can't be managed like a household budget (Guardian)

    Helaine Olen takes on the notion that governments and families must both maintain a balanced budget at all times, a dead horse that has been thoroughly beaten, dismembered, and restored by the finest taxidermists so the beatings may continue.

    More Proof That America Doesn't Have a Spending Problem (Think Progress)

    Travis Waldron notes that a new CBO report shows that government spending under Comrade Obama is so hopelessly out of control that discretionary spending now makes up a smaller share of the economy than it did in 2007, before the recession.

    Declining Wealth Brings a Rising Retirement Risk (NYT)

    Bruce Bartlett writes that as workers are shifted out of defined-benefit pension plans and into defined-contribution plans, it's become clear they're not as good at generating a return as corporate money managers. Now let's try it with their fall-back plans!

    How the Maker of TurboTax Fought Free, Simple Tax Filing (ProPublica)

    As April 15 approaches, Liz Day notes that tax filing could be less ulcer-producing if the IRS prepared the returns. But that doesn't appeal to the tax prep software industry or conservatives who want the government to keep its hands off our payments to it.

    The GOP Needs a New Product, Not a New Brand (HBR)

    Justin Fox writes that while the GOP's current focus is on finding a spokesman who seems less old, white, and curmudgeonly, the key to success is creating and selling a product customers actually want, not just finding new ways to trick them into buying it.

    Texas wants its gold back! Wait, what? (WaPo)

    Channeling his inner leprechaun, Rick Perry is demanding the return of $1 billion worth of his state's gold from the New York Federal Reserve. Neil Irwin explains why that could be a hedge against Texas seceding from the Union -- Perry's other favorite idea.

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  • Daily Digest - March 26: How Millennials Make It Work

    Mar 26, 2013Tim Price

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    How to Create a Workplace That Fits Millennial America (Chief Learning Officer)

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    How to Create a Workplace That Fits Millennial America (Chief Learning Officer)

    Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Director Taylor Jo Isenberg explains why Millennials work best in settings that emphasize individual participation and agency and reward loyalty rather than treating them like the office's latest coffee delivery system.

    Do Millennials Stand a Chance in the Real World? (NYT)

    Annie Lowrey notes that while the Millennial generation seems to have developed a fixation on money, that's because coming of age during a major economic downturn and suffering its consequences has made them acutely aware of how hard it is to make any.

    Unlock Phones So People Can Use Public Airwaves (Bloomberg)

    Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford argues that we shouldn't let telecom giants like Verizon and AT&T make products that lock consumers into their own network when the public is providing both the spectrum and the policy knives used to carve it up.

    Controversy Over Contraception Misses the Economic Point (Forbes)

    NND Editor Bryce Covert writes that the most controversial part of Obamacare requires insurers to cover contraception without a co-pay, but critics may not appreciate the economic benefits of ensuring women can be in the labor force instead of just being in labor.

    The London Whale and the Real Link Between the US economy and Cyprus (Guardian)

    Dean Baker argues that for all the dire warnings we've heard about how government deficits will doom us all, Cyprus shows that the far bigger danger is in allowing banks to run amok until they make a mess and need to bring the public in as their clean-up crew.

    As Obama signs sequestration cuts, his economic goals are at risk (WaPo)

    Zachary Goldfarb writes that President Obama will sign a short-term resolution that keeps the admittedly "dumb" sequester in place, while his own priorities, like funding early education, are mere stretch goals compared to keeping things from getting any dumber.

    Battle of the Budgets (Prospect)

    Jamelle Bouie notes that Senate Democrats have passed a budget for the first time in years, and it's more mainstream and less ambitious than the GOP's ideological salvo or House progressives' alternative. In other news, none of these will become the actual budget.

    Austerity's Cruelest Cut: Democracy Denied in Detroit (The Nation)

    John Nichols writes that the 5 percent of the vote Detroit cast for Rick Snyder in the 2010 gubernatorial race and the 82 percent of the vote it cast against his emergency manager law last year have been thrown out in favor of the only vote that counts: Rick Snyder's.

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  • Daily Digest - March 22: Wall Street Strikes Back

    Mar 22, 2013Tim Price

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    Financial Reform Is Being Dismantled. Why Doesn't President Obama Seem to Care? (TNR)

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    Financial Reform Is Being Dismantled. Why Doesn't President Obama Seem to Care? (TNR)

    Jeff Connaughton writes that while President Obama may want to put Dodd-Frank behind him and move on to other business, Dodd-Frank's opponents would also very much like to put it behind them, preferably inside the shallow grave they're busy digging for it.

    Sneaky House Bill Would Gut Financial Reform (MoJo)

    Case in point: Erika Eichelberger notes that the Swap Jurisdiction Certainty Act would let banks move their risky activities over to foreign subsidiaries to dodge U.S. regulations. Calling it the Wherever You Can Get Away With It Act was deemed too on-the-nose.

    Millennial generation must play active role on HHS federal advisory committees (The Hill)

    Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Senior Fellow Rahul Rekhi makes the case for youth representation on the panels that will oversee implementation of Obamacare, especially since they may be nearing late middle age by the time it's all fully in place.

    Selling the Store: Why Democrats Shouldn't Put Social Security and Medicare on the Table (Robert Reich)

    Reich argues that if Democrats offer up the nation's most popular programs as a ritual sacrifice to the spirit of compromise, they'll be betraying one of the few things Americans still count on to make them more than just "Republicans, but apologetic about it."

    Treasure Island Trauma (NYT)

    Paul Krugman writes that what's unfolding in Cyprus is what happens when a tax shelter turns out to not be built up to code. But in order to avoid scaring off foreign money launderers, officials instead tried to punish domestic investors who fell for the ruse.

    Is sequestration here to stay? (WaPo)

    Suzy Khimm notes that the Continuing Resolution that passed both houses of Congress this week leaves the sequestration cuts in place, but it shifts funding around to make them less of a blow to the economy and more of a chloroform-soaked rag to its face.

    Sequester threatens pile up of discrimination cases (MSNBC)

    Ned Resnikoff writes that one consequence of sequestration is that labor regulators like the NLRB and the EEOC may have to furlough employees, adding to a backlog of cases. Still preferable to conservatives' desire to have them never show up for work again.

    Report: Contraception is good for the economy, everything else (Salon)

    Katie McDonough highlights a report that shows access to contraception helps women plan out their lives and careers better, since most people don't have a long enough lunch break to go bring a new life into the world and then pop back to the office.

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  • Daily Digest - March 21: The Farmer's Almanac of Financial Regulation

    Mar 21, 2013Tim Price

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    Day of Greed (Harper's)

    Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick responds to critics who think it's an exaggeration for him to call the current era the Age of Greed by presenting a devastating collection of evidence: the morning business headlines from the Wall Street Journal.

    Click here to receive the Daily Digest via e-mail.

    Day of Greed (Harper's)

    Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick responds to critics who think it's an exaggeration for him to call the current era the Age of Greed by presenting a devastating collection of evidence: the morning business headlines from the Wall Street Journal.

    Is JPMorgan a farmer? (Salon)

    David Dayen explains how Wall Street wound up routing all its shadiest bits of business through the House Agriculture Committee, which most people probably wouldn't expect to have the power to gut Dodd-Frank's derivatives regulations. (Spoiler: It just did.)

    A Tale of Two Economies (Colorlines)

    Imara Jones writes that if you're not at the top of the economic ladder, above the altitude of little problems like wage stagnation, racial discrimination, or the complete breakdown of our governing institutions, recent news doesn't offer much cause for celebration.

    What the looming debt ceiling fight (yes, another one) tells us (WaPo)

    Jamelle Bouie notes that with the deadline for raising the debt limit approaching, House Republicans want entitlement cuts in exchange for their cooperation. They'll also want a helicopter fueled up and ready to go once the hostages are released unharmed.

    Austerity for Everyone, Prosperity for None (U.S. News)

    Pat Garofalo writes that George Osborne, Paul Ryan's counterpart in the U.K.'s Tory government, has presented another austerity budget to help put the "blight" back in Old Blighty. Plan B is to ask if they can maybe do the Olympics there again next year.

    Women in Healthcare Suffer Abuse Inside and Outside the Home (The Nation)

    NND Editor Bryce Covert writes that while women are dominating the growing domestic work and health care industries, workers in those fields also tend to suffer high rates of physical and emotional abuse and injury. Who nurses the nurses back to health?

    Why the Trader Joe's Model Benefits Workers -- And the Bottom-Line (National Journal)

    Sophie Quinton writes that low-cost retailers like Trader Joe's and Costco have found that paying their workers well results in increased profits, since customers have a better shopping experience when store employees aren't stone-faced and grunting.

    Witness the GOP's Vanishing SKILLS Act (In These Times)

    Mike Elk reports that Eric Cantor's grand plan to redefine the GOP as the party of jobs with his "Make Life Work" agenda got off to a great start as a bill to mush all federal jobs training programs into an undifferentiated lump barely cleared the House.

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