Daily Digest - September 18: The Hashtag of Democracy

Sep 18, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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From #Ferguson to #OfficerFriendly (Bloomberg View)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford explains what the New York Police Department will need to do in order to make its new social media initiatives successful.

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From #Ferguson to #OfficerFriendly (Bloomberg View)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford explains what the New York Police Department will need to do in order to make its new social media initiatives successful.

Census Report Shows Rise in Full-Time Work, Undercutting Claims by Health Reform Opponents (Off the Charts)

Paul N. Van de Water says the Census Bureau report proves that the Affordable Care Act isn't leading to a large increase in part-time work. In fact, part-time work has decreased.

Fed Signals No Hurry to Raise Interest Rates (NYT)

Binyamin Appelbaum reports on the Federal Reserve's latest policy statement, which affirms the necessity of continued stimulus in the form of near-zero short-term interest rates.

What Cutting Jobless Benefits Wrought (U.S. News & World Report)

Pat Garofalo points to the cutting of federal extended unemployment benefits as one of the sources of our continually too-high poverty rate.

The Occupy Movement Takes on Student Debt (New Yorker)

Rolling Jubilee, which buys up debt and cancels it, may be among the Occupy movement's biggest successes, writes Vauhini Vara, but its real hope is for debtors to organize.

Meet the Domestic Worker Organizer Who Won the 'Genius' Grant (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Josh Eidelson profiles Ai-jen Poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, who plans to use her MacArthur "Genius Grant" to endow an organizing fellowship for domestic workers.

Want to Live in a State with No Income Tax? Make Sure You're Super Rich First (The Guardian)

Siri Srinivas looks at a new report on state-level taxes, which shows that most Americans think fair taxes should be progressive by nature, emphasizing income and property taxes over sales tax.

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Daily Digest - September 10: Could a Left-Wing Tea Party Unite Progressives?

Sep 10, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Why We Need a Left Wing Tea Party (The Daily Beast)

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Why We Need a Left Wing Tea Party (The Daily Beast)

Sally Kohn calls on progressive factions to follow the Tea Party's lead and throw all their weight behind uncompromising candidates who are strong on every progressive issue.

Labor Market Unchanged According to July Job Openings Data (EPI)

Comparing job openings data to unemployment, Elise Gould points out that over half of the unemployed were not going to find work in July no matter what they did, because the jobs don't exist.

Government Debt Isn't the Problem—Private Debt Is (The Atlantic)

Richard Vague writes that financial crises can be tied to too-high and rapidly growing private debt, which means policy solutions need to focus on debt relief for low- and middle-income people.

Were Fast-Food Workers Paid to Strike and Protest? (The Guardian)

The answer is no, writes Jana Kasperkevic. That rumor is a corruption of the union strike fund, a pool set aside to help pay for striking workers' arrest fines and lost wages.

Warren Faults Banking Regulators for Lack of Criminal Prosecutions (WSJ)

While Senator Warren focused on the Federal Reserve, Senator Shelby blamed the DoJ for seeking fines instead of jail time for banking executives, report Ryan Tracy and Victoria McGrane.

Want to Fix the Jobs Crisis? Build a Federally Funded Worker Education Infrastructure (TAP)

Good job training programs – the kind that see both students and employers as clients – can be highly successful, writes Paul Osterman, but they're small and difficult to scale up.

The OECD’s Latest Report is Burdened by Economic Myths (AJAM)

Philip Pilkington says that until economic policymakers stop assuming that economies rebalance themselves and that high government debt is the real problem, good policy change is unlikely.

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Daily Digest - August 27: The Known Unknowns of Unemployment

Aug 27, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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A New Reason to Question the Official Unemployment Rate (NYT)

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A New Reason to Question the Official Unemployment Rate (NYT)

A new report says that unemployment data has become less accurate over the past 20 years, in part because of declining survey response rates, writes David Leonhardt.

Objecting to Austerity, French Style (New Yorker)

John Cassidy looks at the implosion of the French government this week, as three ministers, including the economy minister, have been pushed out for their objection to austerity policies.

Money for Nothing: Mincome Experiment Could Pay Dividends 40 Years On (AJAM)

Recently analyzed data from a 1970s Canadian experiment in guaranteed basic income shows far-reaching benefits in health and education, writes Benjamin Shingler.

Companies Say ‘No Way’ to ‘Say on Pay’ (WSJ)

Emily Chasan examines the companies that have repeatedly failed Say-on-Pay shareholder votes on their executives' pay packages, and what they have in common.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Holmberg looks at how Say-on-Pay can curb sky-high executive compensation.

SEIU Wins Election To Represent Minnesota Home Care Workers (HuffPo)

Dave Jamieson says that yesterday's vote, which created Minnesota's largest public-sector bargaining unit in history, shows that unions are not letting Harris v. Quinn slow organizing.

Burger King’s Supremely American Habit (MSNBC)

Timothy Noah points out that Burger King, which might be planning an inversion to avoid U.S. corporate income taxes, already pushes as many costs as possible off its parent company.

Mayor Garcetti Pitching New Minimum Wage Plan to Business Groups (LA Times)

Catherine Saillant reports on business opposition to the Los Angeles mayor's plan, which would raise the city's minimum wage to $13.50 over three years and then tie it to local inflation.

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Daily Digest - August 26: Corporations Shouldn't Get a Free Pass on Tax-Dodging

Aug 26, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Cutting the Corporate Tax Would Make Other Problems Grow (NYT)

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Cutting the Corporate Tax Would Make Other Problems Grow (NYT)

Jared Bernstein counters recent suggestions for eliminating the U.S. corporate income tax by pointing out the extreme difficulty of capturing that revenue through personal income taxes.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz proposes more viable reforms to the corporate income tax.

Stigmatizing Poor Kids in Our Public Schools (PolicyShop)

Matt Bruenig suggests that free lunch at school is the target of so much ire because it's seen as a "poor people thing," even though public schools are themselves a welfare program.

When Workplace Training Programs Actually Hinder Workers (The Nation)

The low-structure, free-choice-based model of the Workforce Investment Act limits its effectiveness, writes Michelle Chen, since it doesn't allow for prioritizing funding for the best training programs.

Another GOP State May Be Signing up for Medicaid, and the Reason is Obvious (LA Times)

Michael Hiltzik says the money being left on the table is finally proving enough to get Republican governors like Wyoming's to push for Medicaid expansion even though it's part of Obamacare.

Back to School, and to Widening Inequality (Robert Reich)

Kids who live in poor neighborhoods are at a disadvantage when it comes to school funding, writes Robert Reich, so economic inequality hobbles these students from an early age.

Central Banks to Lawmakers: You Try Growing the Economy (WaPo)

Ylan Q. Mui reports that the general attitude coming out of the annual Jackson Hole gathering was that monetary policy can only do so much, and legislatures need to step it up.

Cities Can Ease Homelessness With Storage Units (City Lab)

Kriston Capps looks at an innovative program in San Diego that creates stability by providing homeless people with transitional storage where they can safely leave their belongings each day.

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Daily Digest - August 25: The Mortgage Crisis, Act 2

Aug 25, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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You Thought the Mortgage Crisis Was Over? It's About to Flare Up Again (TNR)

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You Thought the Mortgage Crisis Was Over? It's About to Flare Up Again (TNR)

With a large number of mortgage relief measures scheduled to end in the coming year, David Dayen says that many foreclosures will seem as though they were only deferred from 2008.

Why the Robots Might Not Take Our Jobs After All: They Lack Common Sense (NYT)

Neil Irwin reports on MIT labor scholar David Autor's new paper, which argues that robots can't handle common-sense decision making, so they'll only be able to replace certain kinds of jobs.

  • Roosevelt Take: Autor presented a version of this scenario in his video speculation for the Next American Economy project.

Middle Class is Excluded from America's Economic 'Recovery' (The Guardian)

Heidi Moore points out that the recovery isn't much of one for most Americans, and the economists who gathered in Jackson Hole this weekend can't do much to fix that.

Fed Chair Cautious on Timing of Rate Rises, Questions Health of Job Market (AJAM)

Janet Yellen's first speech at the Jackson Hole conference defended her approach, arguing that caution is still needed because the long-term effects of the recession aren't yet clear.

Could America Accept Another FDR? (WaPo)

Fred Hiatt wonders whether modern political discourse and journalism would permit another person like Franklin D. Roosevelt, with his illness and complicated family, to make it to the White House.

Middle Class Households' Wealth Fell 35 Percent from 2005 to 2011 (Vox)

Danielle Kurtzleben reports on new data from the Census Bureau, which shows a dramatic change in U.S. households' net worth, particularly for the bottom three quintiles.

New on Next New Deal

The Ferguson Challenge to the Libertarians

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal says the profit-motivated criminal justice system in Ferguson, heavy on court fees and fines, looks a lot like the libertarian ideal of privatization – and it isn't working.

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Daily Digest - August 13: Working Without a Net in the Gig Economy

Aug 13, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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America's Social Safety Net is Failing Workers in the 'Gig Economy' (The Week)

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America's Social Safety Net is Failing Workers in the 'Gig Economy' (The Week)

Particularly in today's economy of short-term gigs, contract work, and other forms of precarious employment, Sarah Jaffe says the current system of unemployment benefits isn't cutting it.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Operations Director Lydia Bowers looks at some of the other labor protections missing in the gig economy.

By Any Measure, The Job Market Is Getting Better (FiveThirtyEight)

No matter how he counts the unemployed, Ben Casselman finds the same pattern: the ratio of job-seekers to available jobs has dropped significantly, almost to pre-recession levels.

Graphic: Unpaid Interns Have Few Legal Rights (Bloomberg Businessweek)

In this flowchart, Josh Eidelson lays out the scant legal protections afforded interns throughout the country, with details about relevant court cases and state-by-state variations.

Yellen Resolved to Avoid Raising Rates Too Soon, Fearing Downturn (Reuters)

Howard Schneider and Jonathan Spicer report that Federal Reserve insiders say Janet Yellen is showing extreme caution on raising interest rates, because inflation is easier to fight than recessions.

Another Argument Against the Medicaid Expansion Just Got Weaker (WaPo)

Jason Millman looks at the history of Medicaid funding, and finds that states don't really have to worry about the federal government backing out of its share of expansion funding.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn ties refusal to expand Medicaid to the U.S.'s high and increasing maternal mortality rate.

The Jobs Added In Today’s Economy Pay A Quarter Less Than The Ones We Lost In The Recession (ThinkProgress)

Bryce Covert looks at a new report from the U.S. Council of Mayors, which shows that the jobs added since the recession pay less largely due to the sectors in which jobs were lost and regained.

Labor and Small Businesses Team up on California Franchising Law (MSNBC)

The proposed law would make it harder to terminate franchise agreements. Ned Resnikoff says labor groups hope franchisees will treat workers better with less franchisor influence and interference.

New on Next New Deal

The Inconvenient Truth About Ineqality

In his video speculation for the Next American Economy project, Lenny Mendonca says a "vested set of interests" will keep the issues raised in Piketty's Capital out of real policy debates.

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Daily Digest - August 12: What Happens When the Workers Become the Owners?

Aug 12, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Is Worker Ownership a Way Forward for Market Basket? (Truthout)

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Is Worker Ownership a Way Forward for Market Basket? (Truthout)

Gar Alperovitz says the current protests at Market Basket are a sign of the desire for community and worker-friendly businesses, which he suggests are easier to achieve with employee ownership.

Surprise! North Carolina Cuts to Jobless Benefits Did Not Help Workers (TAP)

Valerie Wilson lays out the data, which shows that cutting the duration and amount of unemployment benefits did not magically improve the job market in North Carolina.

New York Prosecutors Charge Payday Lenders With Usury (NYT)

State prosecutors charged a group of lenders incorporated across the country with shared (and obscured) ownership of charging illegal interest rates to New Yorkers, reports Jessica Silver-Greenberg.

Give the President (and Yourself) a Break (U.S. News & World Report)

Instead of griping about the President's vacation, lawmakers should work to ensure that all Americans get paid vacation time and are able to use it, writes Pat Garofalo.

Unions Team Up With Fast-Food Owners (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Patrick Clark looks at the uneasy alliance between fast food franchisees and labor unions as they push for fairer franchising laws in California, which unions hope would translate into better working conditions.

It Matters How Rich the Rich Are (Policy Shop)

Matt Bruenig says that we must know how rich the rich are in order to fight poverty, since the distribution of wealth creates poverty. He also asks how we would know if policy is working without that data.

How Student Debt Crushes Your Chances of Buying a Home (WaPo)

Dina ElBoghdady looks at a new study that lays out the complex ways student debt interacts with homeownership, including a close look at total amount of debt and size of payments.

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Sarah Burd-Sharps: Without Public Investment, the U.S. Will Fall Into Chaos

Aug 8, 2014

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Measure of America's Sarah Burd-Sharps looks at the sweeping consequences of the government's failure to invest in the future.

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Measure of America's Sarah Burd-Sharps looks at the sweeping consequences of the government's failure to invest in the future.

Sarah Burd-Sharps, Co-Director of Measure of America, speculates on the consequences of declining public investment in infrastructure, regulation, education, and more. With government abdicating its basic responsibilities, the U.S. will face increasing chaos -- collapsing bridges, food contamination outbreaks, falling elevators, and unemployed teenagers. Burd-Sharps imagines a moderate political wing moved to act by the rising economic costs of under-investment.

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Dane Stangler: Changing Demographics and Funding Strategies Will Expand Entrepreneurship

Aug 6, 2014

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Dane Stangler of the Kauffman Foundation predicts that the entrepreneur class will become more diverse as a younger population makes use of new funding platforms.

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Dane Stangler of the Kauffman Foundation predicts that the entrepreneur class will become more diverse as a younger population makes use of new funding platforms.

By 2040, demographic trends will drive a flourishing of new kinds of entrepreneurial activities, speculated Dane Stangler, Vice President of Research and Policy at the Kauffman Foundation. We will see a bulge in the 20-40 age demographic -- the key entrepreneurial age. But most importantly, new platforms -- like crowd-funding and re-localized production -- will allow for the diversification of entrepreneurship. For the first time, this will allow Americans from a wide range of backgrounds to build new businesses.  

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Daily Digest - August 4: The Underappreciated Success of Financial Reform

Aug 4, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Obama’s Other Success (NYT)

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Obama’s Other Success (NYT)

Dodd-Frank financial reform is proving more successful than expected, writes Paul Krugman. He cites Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal in debunking the claim that the law created permanent bailouts.

The NFL Cheerleaders Should Be Your Fair-Pay Heroes (TNR)

Bryce Covert looks at what's needed to achieve wage growth in today's economy. She talks to Mike Konczal, who suggests that the Fed could help everyone's wages if it focused on unemployment.

Economy Adds 209,000 Jobs in July; Unemployment Rate Edges Up to 6.2 Percent (WaPo)

Ylan Q. Mui breaks down Friday's jobs report, which was generally positive but showed that underemployment (part-timers who want more hours) and long-term unemployment haven't budged.

Relying on Online Listings, Young Americans Struggle to Find Jobs (The Guardian)

Today's system of online job applications isn't making the search any easier, writes Jana Kasperkevic, as job-seekers find that their applications seem to disappear into black holes.

Work and Worth (Robert Reich)

Robert Reich emphasizes the difference between pay and value to society, given that kindergarten teachers and social workers make far less than hedge fund managers.

New on Next New Deal

The Worker-Owned Small Business Revolution

In his video speculation for the Next American Economy project, Gar Alperovitz predicts that as MBAs realize that worker-owned companies achieve higher productivity, the model will grow.

Thinking About the Women in Think Tanks

Bringing more women into the upper echelons of policy work will require engaging younger women in this work, writes Roosevelt Institute Summer Academy Fellow Hannah Zhang.

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