Daily Digest - October 24: Campaign Finance Meets PRISM

Oct 24, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Who Buys the Spies? The Hidden Corporate Cash Behind America’s Out-of-Control National Surveillance State (Next New Deal)

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Who Buys the Spies? The Hidden Corporate Cash Behind America’s Out-of-Control National Surveillance State (Next New Deal)

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Tom Ferguson, Paul Jorgensen, and Jie Chen write about the connection between the surveillance state and campaign finance that they found in their recent study of campaign contributions in 2012.

  • Roosevelt Take: Read the working paper from their study, "Party Competition and Industrial Structure in the 2012 Elections," here.

Low-Wage Workers are Fighting for More Than Just Money (AJAM)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that wage theft, scheduling, and a lack of time and resources to challenge mistreatment are just as important as money to low-wage workers who are organizing. Those things all add up to serious limits on economic mobility.

Defying Koch Cash and D.C. Gridlock, Airport Town Will Vote on a $15 Minimum Wage (Salon)

Josh Eidelson reports that in SeaTac, Washington, residents will soon vote on whether or not to raise their minimum wage far above any other in the country. He thinks that they've got a pretty good shot at success.

One-Third of Americans See a Lifetime of Work (MSNBC)

Emma Margolin reports on a study conducted by Wells Fargo, which found that 37 percent of Americans anticipate working until they physically cannot. When the bills are too high to save for retirement too, working until death seems like the only option.

The Millennials' Failure to Launch: Searching the Jobs Report for Answers (The Guardian)

Jana Kasperkevic uses the September jobs report to figure out why Millennials are falling so far behind in this economy. The unstable economy is putting young people behind schedule, and it could effect the stability of their careers far down the road.

The Biggest Economy Killer: Our Government (NYT)

Steven Rattner argues that the continuing dysfunction in Washington is causing the most harm to our economy. The shutdown only lasted sixteen days, but seemingly permanent gridlock is something else entirely.

New on Next New Deal

Larry Klein's Lesson for the Single-Minded Economists Who Rejected Keynes

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Jeff Madrick considers the work of the late Nobel laureate Larry Klein, and echoes his frustration with government policy that ignores fiscal stimulus.

What Kind of Problem is the ACA Rollout for Liberalism?

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that Healthcare.gov's problems are based in neoliberal ideas, heavily focused on private provisioning and means testing. These are pretty conservative ideas, and these difficulties could make New Deal-style liberalism more appealing.

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Daily Digest - October 23: Jobs Report Wasn't Worth the Wait

Oct 23, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Weak Job Gains May Cause Delay in Action by Fed (NYT)

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Weak Job Gains May Cause Delay in Action by Fed (NYT)

Catherine Rampell reports on the September jobs report, released more then two weeks behind schedule thanks to the shutdown. The September numbers are weak, and the rest of the year's jobs reports will be impacted by the whiplash of shutdown.

The Jobs Report was Totally Blech. And it May Get Worse. (WaPo)

Neil Irwin considers what conclusions should be drawn from the September jobs report. His top two are that the Fed's decision to maintain quantitative easing looks better and better, and that sequestration is probably to blame for weak growth.

Wall Street’s Government Disconnect (The Daily Beast)

Daniel Gross asks why Wall Street reacts so frantically to every suggestion of federal or state government default, when such a thing has never happened. Only municipalities have defaulted, so why did so many companies shed bonds that were due in October?

Don’t Blame Health Law for High Part-Time Employment (WSJ)

Ben Casselman says that for all that anti-Obamacare politicians try to connect the law to rises in part-time employment, the data just isn't there. Over the past year, when the employer mandate was still expected for 2014, part-time work has stayed flat.

There Is No Evidence That Obamacare Will Make Poor Americans Less Likely to Work (The Atlantic)

Matthew O'Brien argues that Oregon's 2008 Medicaid expansion, which offered slots in the program by lottery, offers proof that obtaining health insurance won't cause people to stop working. That isn't surprising: healthcare doesn't buy groceries.

Sara Ziff’s Underage-Model Bill Gets Signed Into Law (NY Mag)

Charlotte Cowles celebrates the new law that gives underage models the protections that other child performers in New York have had for years, like education requirements. The law will be in effect before the next New York Fashion Week.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren wrote about Sarah Ziff and the Model Alliance when they first began their labor organizing efforts.

CHART: Welfare Reform Is Leaving More In Deep Poverty (MoJo)

Stephanie Mencimer looks at a Center on Budget and Policy Priorities report on TANF, which finds that monthly cash benefits have steadily lost value since 1996's welfare reform. That's happened alongside an 130% increase in families with children living in extreme poverty.

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The Digital Divide is Holding Young New Yorkers Back

Sep 18, 2013Nell Abernathy

New York City public school students in lower-income neighborhoods suffer from very slow Internet speeds. Our next mayor can help.

It's clear that the Internet is a vitally important resource for education, innovation, and opportunity. And we know that 21st century kids need it to write papers, apply to colleges, and find jobs (not just to watch videos of kittens playing with string).

New York City public school students in lower-income neighborhoods suffer from very slow Internet speeds. Our next mayor can help.

It's clear that the Internet is a vitally important resource for education, innovation, and opportunity. And we know that 21st century kids need it to write papers, apply to colleges, and find jobs (not just to watch videos of kittens playing with string).

Sadly, young New Yorkers have unequal access to the Internet. 75 percent of the city's public schools have Internet speeds of 10 Mbps or slower. When shared with a large number of users, these speeds preclude heavy research downloads, e-reader usage, and educational video-streaming resources. They are also 100 times slower than the target President Obama set for 2020 in the National Broadband Plan.

The red dots in the following graph show that about 18 percent of New York City public schools have networks even slower than 10 Mbps (218 with Internet speeds of 1.5 Mbps or less, and three with 5 Mbps speed). The graph is courtesy of an August report commissioned by Manhattan Bourough President and Comptroller Candidate Scott Stringer.

Unsurprisingly, the public schools with the slowest Internet speeds tend to be in the lowest-income neighborhoods, like the South Bronx and Northeastern Brooklyn, and those with faster speeds tend to be in median- and high-income neighborhoods in Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island.

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford was quoted in the Stringer report, reminding us that "[t]ruly high speed wired Internet access is as basic to innovation, economic growth, social communication, and the country’s competitiveness as electricity was a century ago.”

For a city at the center of our country's innovation, economic growth, and social communication, inferior Internet speeds at New York's low-income public schools are a clear example of the inequality problem. Luckily, we have clear models for solving this particular public policy challenge. D.C., for example, has invested in delivering an affordable broadband network to 250 public institutions, like libraries, schools, and community centers. Kansas City, in partnership with Google, is offering every household access to 1 GB (1,000 Mbps) fiber networks at subsized rates. What will our next mayor do?

Nell Abernathy is the Program Manager for the Roosevelt Institute's Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative.

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Why Workers Would Do Better with Janet Yellen as Fed Chair

Sep 17, 2013Jeff Madrick

Wall Street has responded well to Summers's withdrawal, but Main Street would also be better off without an inflation hawk leading the Federal Reserve.

Wall Street has responded well to Summers's withdrawal, but Main Street would also be better off without an inflation hawk leading the Federal Reserve.

The stock and bond markets should not be the only ones rejoicing at Larry Summers’s withdrawal from consideration to run the Federal Reserve. The nation’s workers should, too. Janet Yellen, the remaining frontrunner for the position, is no wimp on inflation. But she is the kind of economist America badly needs, one who cares about wages and employment at least as much as about appeasing bond traders. She also doesn’t think higher wages or a bit higher inflation will undo America. She is old enough to remember a pre-Clinton and pre-Reagan world. 

Right now, that means she would leave monetary policy loose far longer than Summers would have. The job market is much too weak; many people are unemployed or have left the work force, and wages are not growing. Without fiscal help from Congress, the Fed is the only protector of growth and employment around.

The Clinton boom covered up Summers’s true conservative ideological bent. He’s a tough inflation fighter underneath it all. The main policy objective of the Clinton Treasury was to focus on the budget deficit. They successfully got a tax increase passed, for which they deserve kudos. But then they restrained social spending. They did at least expand the Earned Income Tax Credit, but they neglected public investment badly, and the flaws of welfare reform are now showing. They assiduously paid down debt instead of investing, even as tax revenues poured in.

It seemed to work. Inequality stabilized, wages rose, GDP soared. But a lot of the boom depended on the high-tech stock bubble—the famed wealth effect, inducing consumers to buy because they thought they were wealthy. The increase in tax revenues was temporarily stoked by capital gains taxes on stocks. Stocks were stoked by malfeasance amid deceptive sales practices.

Would wages have continued to rise rapidly under Clintonomics? Not likely. The stock market collapse, let’s remember, occurred under Clinton. The recession George W. Bush had to cope with in his first term was a Clinton recession.

At bottom, Summers is basically an inflation targeter, converted by the double-digit inflation and higher federal deficits of the 1970s like so many of his Democratic colleagues. This defined Clintonomics. He’d rather have more unemployment than a little more inflation, which of course could spook the markets.

And frankly, Obama is a Clintonite on the deficit and inflation as well. More than anything else, this is why he wanted Summers. He wanted a Clintonite to run the Fed and sit astride inflation. With Summers by his side, he announced he would form a budget balancing commission even before he took office in 2009. His stimulus worked to stanch the Great Recession, but he hardly ever boasted about it and never came back to Congress for another one. He turned his attention to deficit fighting.

Here is a key paragraph from a Yellen speech earlier this year. It sets her apart from Summers, I think.

I believe the policy steps we have taken recently are in accord with this balanced approach. With employment so far from its maximum level and with inflation currently running, and expected to continue to run, at or below the Committee's 2 percent longer-term objective, it is entirely appropriate for progress in attaining maximum employment to take center stage in determining the Committee's policy stance.

Yellen predates Clintonomics. She can remember a time when you could get rapid wage growth, modest inflation, and a well-regulated financial sector at the same time. Summers got on famously with Greenspan. Yellen had her disagreements.

My guess is she’d tighten policy before many progressives think she should anyway, including this writer. She will worry about new speculative bubbles, which Summers and Greenspan did not. She is a mainstream economist, but a thoughtful and compassionate one.

Yellen would also reject the argument that unemployment is basically structural. Some say we have lots of jobs that American’s don’t have the skills for. She had it researched and found, as did others, that there were no increases in demand for workers or resulting increases in wages in the sectors of the economy where workers were supposed to be scarce. So unemployment is cyclical, not structural. We don’t know what Summers believes about structural unemployment, but he almost surely believes the rate cannot fall as far as Yellen thinks. 

Yellen is not part of the old boy network, so Obama may still not appoint her. She is not a backslapper. She’s likely to be more impressed by economists who do very good scholarship than by hedge fund managers.

She is quiet woman. She is personally low-key, which disguises firm, well-developed opinions. But she’s battled before at the Fed, so she’s not afraid of a fight.

Workers should rejoice. Wages may go up handsomely again under her reign. The unemployment rate could fall below 6 percent, where it belongs. That is, if Obama has the stuff to give a pre-Clintonite who seems to dislike Washington networking the job. 

It would be a return to an older Democratic tradition and be damned good for America.

Jeff Madrick is a Senior Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative.

 

Federal Reserve image via Shutterstock.com

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Why New York is Home to So Many of the Working Poor, in Graphs

Sep 16, 2013Nell Abernathy

The Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative is trying to understand how New York got so unequal. And we're looking for solutions.

The Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative is trying to understand how New York got so unequal. And we're looking for solutions.

So what is behind this big shift toward income inequality in New York? Income trends in the city represent an amplified version of our national problems: low-wage jobs without benefits are replacing middle-wage jobs that could support families. Nationwide, middle-wage jobs constituted 60 percent of the jobs lost during the Great Recession and only 22 percent of those regained during recovery, according to analysis from Roosevelt Institute’s Annette Bernhardt at NELP. Meanwhile, low-wage jobs made up only 21 percent of recession job losses and 58 percent of jobs gained since.

The national trend started well before the Great Recession.

And in New York, it’s been the same, but worse. A 2012 report from the Federal Reserve found that middle-income jobs comprised 67 percent of employment in downstate New York in the 1980s, but by 2010, that number fell to 55.8 percent.

Top that off with the fact that for the last decade, wages have risen for the top 5 percent and stagnated or fallen for middle- and low-income workers, and you begin to see the currents driving our inequality crisis.

Why is this happening? Technology? Wall Street? Policy? Education?

We’ll explore those questions and potential solutions at our upcoming panel, "Inequality in New York: The Next Mayor’s Challenge."

Nell Abernathy is the Program Manager for the Roosevelt Institute's Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative.

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Three Graphs That Show Why Inequality Matters in the New York City Mayoral Race

Sep 11, 2013Nell Abernathy

The New York City primary results show that the issue of rising inequality is striking a chord with voters. Here's why.

The results are in and two (or three) candidates are one step closer to Gracie Mansion. What we know for certain is that along with winning international attention and prime seats at Yankee Stadium, New York’s next mayor will inherit a city that is more unequal in terms of income than any other major city in America.

The increasing polarization of wealth in New York has been a hot topic and served as the campaign centerpiece for one of yesterday’s big winners, Bill de Blasio. We are trying to resist pointing out that experts like our own Jeff Madrick were talking about this problem even before the drum circles of Zuccotti Park, but we’re happy that the city’s Sierra Leone-like inequality is at last making headlines.

Because we know that we can do better, and we hope our next mayor will at least try, the Roosevelt Institute’s Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative is taking a look back at some of the most compelling charts and graphs to surface on the long road to Election Day.

From James Parrott, at the Fiscal Policy Institute, who will be a panelist at our upcoming forum on inequality:

The top 1 percent are capturing a growing portion of the nation’s economy, and nowhere is that trend more pronounced than in New York.

The top 1 percent, in fact, pay less than their fair share of the tax burden:

Meanwhile, the poverty rate in New York City continues to rise: 

We will be back tomorrow with more infographics. To learn more about potential solutions to our growing wealth gap, join us for our panel discussion on Tuesday, September 24:

Inequality in New York: The Next Mayor’s Challenge

September 24, 2013

6:00 p.m. cocktail reception

6:30 – 8:00 p.m. panel discussion

Roosevelt House, Public Policy Institute at Hunter College

49 East 65th Street

New York, NY 10065

Nell Abernathy is the Program Manager for the Roosevelt Institute's Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative.

The New York City primary results show that the issue of rising inequality is striking a chord with voters. Here's why.

The results are in and two (or three) candidates are one step closer to Gracie Mansion. What we know for certain is that along with winning international attention and prime seats at Yankee Stadium, New York’s next mayor will inherit a city that is more unequal in terms of income than any other major city in America.

The increasing polarization of wealth in New York has been a hot topic and served as the campaign centerpiece for one of yesterday’s big winners, Bill de Blasio. We are trying to resist pointing out that experts like our own Jeff Madrick were talking about this problem even before the drum circles of Zuccotti Park, but we’re happy that the city’s Sierra Leone-like inequality is at last making headlines.

Because we know that we can do better, and we hope our next mayor will at least try, the Roosevelt Institute’s Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative is taking a look back at some of the most compelling charts and graphs to surface on the long road to Election Day.

From James Parrott, at the Fiscal Policy Institute, who will be a panelist at our upcoming forum on inequality:

The top 1 percent are capturing a growing portion of the nation’s economy, and nowhere is that trend more pronounced than in New York.

The top 1 percent, in fact, pay less than their fair share of the tax burden:

Meanwhile, the poverty rate in New York City continues to rise: 

We will be back tomorrow with more infographics. To learn more about potential solutions to our growing wealth gap, join us for our panel discussion on Tuesday, September 24:

Inequality in New York: The Next Mayor’s Challenge



September 24, 2013



6:00 p.m. cocktail reception



6:30 – 8:00 p.m. panel discussion



Roosevelt House, Public Policy Institute at Hunter College



49 East 65th Street



New York, NY 10065

Nell Abernathy is the Program Manager for the Roosevelt Institute's Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative.

 

New York City skyline image via Shutterstock.com

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Daily Digest - September 9: Economic Inequality and the Fed Chair

Sep 9, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Why Janet Yellen, Not Larry Summers, Should Lead the Fed (NYT)

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Why Janet Yellen, Not Larry Summers, Should Lead the Fed (NYT)

Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that Summers's role in deregulation in the 1990s led to today's economic issues. He'd much prefer a Fed chair with proven judgement and expertise who didn't help to create the inequality we deal with now.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Jeff Madrick and Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal agree with Stiglitiz's pick for Fed chair.

Why Keynes Wouldn’t Have Too Rosy a View of our Economic Future (WaPo)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal breaks down Keynesian theory to explain why employment might not bounce back on its own. If that's the case, it would be nice to see policy that actually reflects the need to create jobs.

This Chart Shows The Real Problem With The August Jobs Report (Business Insider)

Josh Barro's big issue? The August jobs report is proof that the economy isn't actually improving as much as it was thought all summer. Job creation is stagnant at about 2 million new jobs per year, and the Fed seems to think that slow and steady is just right.

Did the White House’s Trial Balloon for Larry Summers Just Pop? (Quartz)

Tim Fernholz suggests that without the support of three liberal Democrats on the Senate banking committee, it may not matter if the President wants Summers for Fed chair. The administration would need to attempt the impossible: securing Republican votes.

A.F.L.-C.I.O. Has Plan to Add Millions of Nonunion Members (NYT)

Steven Greenhouse examines the A.F.L.-C.I.O.'s new plan to reinvigorate the labor movement. It's based on a simple question: if 49 percent of employees in a workplace vote for a union, why doesn't the union welcome that 49 percent?

Walmart Workers Plan 'Widespread, Massive Strikes and Protests' for Black Friday 2013 (The Nation)

Josh Eidelson reports on continued momentum in the OUR Walmart strikes as workers begin to think about retail's busiest day. Walmart still claims that none of their employees are actually involved in the strikes: apparently, it's all a union-backed stunt.

A Different Type of Poverty (U.S. News & World Report)

Happy Carlock interviews Sasha Abramsky about his new book, The American Way of Poverty: How the Other Half Still Lives. American poverty is about economic insecurity, and it's made worse, he says, by increasing inequality.

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Daily Digest - September 4: No Jobs, Lots of Problems

Sep 4, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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America’s Jobless Generation (NYRB)

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Jeff Madrick argues that policy, not technology, is keeping unemployment high. He's particularly concerned about the effect of these policies on young people.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

America’s Jobless Generation (NYRB)

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Jeff Madrick argues that policy, not technology, is keeping unemployment high. He's particularly concerned about the effect of these policies on young people.

Why This Particular Recovery Is So Bad at Creating New Jobs (Pacific Standard)

Timothy Noah looks at various reasons that our recovery isn't solving unemployment. He suggests that the economy is following Walmart, which doesn't seem to want to hire anyone in a permanent position these days, preferring "flexible" temporary workers.

401(k)s are Replacing Pensions. That’s Making Inequality Worse. (WaPo)

Lydia DePillis argues that the growth of 401(k)s is going to increase inequality among the elderly. Pensions aren't perfect, but at least they didn't require low-income workers to decide between today's bills and tomorrow's retirement.

Justice Department Tackles Quality Of Defense For The Poor (All Things Considered)

Carrie Johnson reports on a Department of Justice filling in a case on the quality of public defense in two cities in Northern Washington. Overburdened defense attorneys agree that an independent monitor's oversight would help.

In Budget Cuts, Low-Income Students Suffer More Than Wealthy Ones (MSNBC)

Suzy Khimm explains why poorer school districts are being hit harder by sequesteration then wealthier districts that could presumably absorb some cuts. With straight cuts across the board, the more federal funds a district typically needs, the more it loses this year.

What's Killing Poor White Women? (TAP)

Monica Potts examines the decreasing life expectancy of uneducated white women. Weaving facts about the demographic into the story of one such woman's early death, she tells a harrowing tale about how much these factors effect a life.

New on Next New Deal

How Ronald Coase Demolished Current Libertarian Ideas About Property

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that Ronald Coase's work helps to prove that "self-ownership" can't solve all our problems. Property rights overlap, and social arrangements (like government) must prioritize one owner over others.

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Daily Digest - September 3: Labor Takes Center Stage

Sep 3, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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A Dramatic Display of Labor's Power (Melissa Harris-Perry)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren points out the differences in how stakeholders discuss the fast food strikes. The restaurant industry talks about digging into the pockets of small business owners; the workers want a fair share of massive corporate profits.

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A Dramatic Display of Labor's Power (Melissa Harris-Perry)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren points out the differences in how stakeholders discuss the fast food strikes. The restaurant industry talks about digging into the pockets of small business owners; the workers want a fair share of massive corporate profits.

Politics, Race, and the Future of the U.S. Labor Movement (Democracy)

Dorian Warren considers the ways that race and region fit into the labor economy of the U.S., where workers of color make lower wages and union power is focused in Democrat-leaning states. The limits of labor's power are more apparent within these boundaries.

'No one should have to work for free': Is This the End of the Unpaid Internship? (NBC News)

Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz suggests that recent lawsuits against employers by unpaid interns could signal the beginning of the end of this practice. As unpaid internships get more media attention, companies are taking notice.

How America's Minimum Wage Really Stacks Up Globally (The Atlantic)

Jordan Weissmann compares various minimum wages using "purchasing power parity," which takes into account differences in local prices. PPP makes the U.S. minimum wage look a little better compared to other wealthy nations, but not great.

Why Isn't Every Monday Like Labor Day? (HuffPo)

Arthur Delaney looks at the historical trend of shortening work days and work weeks, and wonders why that progression has stalled. Shorter work weeks or work sharing could be ways to reduce unemployment, but aren't being seriously considered.

  • Roosevelt Take: Work sharing was one of the ideas discussed at the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative's conference, "A Bold Approach to the Jobs Emergency," back in June. Transcripts and video from all the sessions are now available.

Love for Labor Lost (NYT)

Paul Krugman questions why Republicans cannot bring themselves to acknowledge the worker on Labor Day. As he sees it, they refuse to respect those who work for a living, but aren't wealthy, because without wealth everyone's a "taker."

How the Fed Chair Race Became a Public Circus, and Why it Matters (WaPo)

Neil Irwin says that shifts in political media and White House mismanagement have contributed to the arguments over the next Fed chair. The far more public role of the position in recent years makes this appointment even more politically charged.

This Week in Poverty: John Lewis, Barack Obama and the New March (The Nation)

Greg Kaufmann says that it isn't enough when President Obama talks about wages and working conditions. Executive order could ensure workers under federal contracts get a living wage and extend minimum wage protections to home care workers.

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Daily Digest - August 30: More Labor Organizing for the Holiday

Aug 30, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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A New Dawn for Labor Day (BeyondChron)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt considers the importance and significance of the August 29 fast food strikes. The growth of these strikes and other labor organizing shows a new hunger for worker representation on the job.

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A New Dawn for Labor Day (BeyondChron)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt considers the importance and significance of the August 29 fast food strikes. The growth of these strikes and other labor organizing shows a new hunger for worker representation on the job.

Economic Justice to the Fore (ACSblog)

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Senior Fellow for Equal Justice Erik Lampmann reflects on the March on Washington. He's particularly excited by the energy that youth movements like Dream Defenders and the Black Youth Project bring to the modern fight for civil rights.

National Fast Food Strike Hits Dozens of Cities (MSNBC)

Ned Resnikoff reports on the importance of the fast food strikes' growth into Southern cities. He quotes Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren, who says that the involvement of Southern workers is proof that this movement is truly national now.

Feminism's Sticky Fast-Food Floor (The Daily Beast)

Sally Kohn thinks that as great as it is that some women are breaking through the glass ceiling, feminists can't forget about the women stuck in low-wage jobs. Leaning in against economic inequality helps far more women then leaning in on Wall Street.

Why I'm on Strike Today: I Can't Support Myself on $7.85 at Burger King (The Guardian)

Willietta Dukes writes that in her fifteen years of working in fast food, she's never missed a shift or arrived late, until yesterday's strike. Between low wages, limited hours, and erratic scheduling, she can't pay for basic necessities - like her mortgage.

New on Next New Deal

Why Unions are Essential to Tackling the Technology Challenge to Good Jobs

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch says that technology isn't eliminating more "abstract" intellectual jobs, but it is keeping people in low-wage low-skill work. That makes labor organizing essential to ensure those jobs retain dignity and fair pay.

What Works: Roosevelt Institute Recommendations for Labor Day Weekend

Looking for something to read or watch this Labor Day weekend? The Roosevelt Institute staff and Fellows provide their suggestions for books, films, poems, and more with a compelling take on labor issues. Enjoy the holiday weekend!

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