Daily Digest - March 17: The Pacific Standard for Bad Deals

Mar 17, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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On the Wrong Side of Globalization (NYT)

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On the Wrong Side of Globalization (NYT)

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz argues that trade deals like the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership create a race to the bottom for regulations, and exacerbate inequality.

The Great Corporate Cash-Hoarding Crisis (AJAM)

David Cay Johnston says that multinationals keeping their cash abroad instead of investing in their businesses or paying income taxes on it is what is keeping the U.S. from a real economic recovery.

10 Things Elizabeth Warren's Consumer Protection Agency Has Done for You (MoJo)

Erika Eichelberger lists the changes the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has already pushed through since its creation in 2011, which affect homeowners, student loan holders, and anyone with a credit card.

Capping Public Service Loan Forgiveness at $57.5K Defeats Its Purpose (HuffPo)

People who use the PSLF program are trying to do good for the country, and according to Tim Lowden, this proposed cap would create a disincentive to entering these absolutely vital careers.

Income Gap, Meet the Longevity Gap (NYT)

Two U.S. counties, separated by only 350 miles, have life expectancies that differ as much as Sweden and Iraq. Annie Lowrey reports on how inequality is affecting the length of people's lives.

Paul Ryan’s Worst Nightmare: Here’s the Real Way to Cut Poverty in America (Salon)

Michael Lind thinks planning to avert future poverty is great, but we could reduce poverty today with a simple solution: increased government spending in the form of generous welfare and social insurance programs.

The Cost of Kale: How Foodie Trends Can Hurt Low-Income Families (Bitch Magazine)

Flat wages and rising food costs are only exasperated by food gentrification and trends, says Soleil Ho. From 2007 to 2012, wages remained stagnant, while the cost of feeding a family increased 18 percent.

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Daily Digest - March 10: Main Street Pays Rent to Wall Street

Mar 10, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Could a Wall Street Firm be Your Landlord? (Melissa Harris-Perry)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren points out the possibility that new rental-backed securities from Wall Street could pose a civil rights problem if they capitalize on communities of color.

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Could a Wall Street Firm be Your Landlord? (Melissa Harris-Perry)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren points out the possibility that new rental-backed securities from Wall Street could pose a civil rights problem if they capitalize on communities of color.

US Postal Service Inspector General Proposes Launching Low-Fee Public Bank (Real News Network)

Postal banking would aim to help low-income Americans who are currently unbanked, says Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal, without the predatory fees they would face at traditional banks.

The Real Story Behind the Detroit Pension Fight and What it Means to America's Future (Alternet)

Lynn Stuart Parramore speaks to Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Rob Johnson about the so-called pensions crisis. The key takeaway: cutting pensions is a choice, one that will cause harm for generations.

More on CBO and the Limits of Economic Analysis (On The Economy)

Jared Bernstein responds to a critique from Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick, arguing that what needs to change isn't the Congressional Budget Office's analyses, but our lack of skepticism.

Unemployment in February Remains Elevated Across the Board (Working Economics)

Heidi Shierholz compares February's jobs report to pre-recession numbers, and argues that the sustained high unemployment across the board is proof that the jobs crisis comes from a lack of demand.

Why Americans Should Take August Off (The Nation)

Vacationing isn't a sign of laziness, writes Bryce Covert; it boosts spending and productivity, both of which would be great for the U.S. economy.

New on Next New Deal

What Les Misérables Can Teach Us About Paul Ryan's Poverty Plan

"Honest work, just reward" is a central conceit in GOP anti-poverty plans, but Nell Abernathy, Program Manager for the Roosevelt Institute's Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative, says this ignores the realities of low-income work.

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Daily Digest - March 7: Holding Banks to a Higher Standard

Mar 7, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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What's the Deal: How to Make the Financial System Safer for Everyone with Mike Konczal (YouTube)

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What's the Deal: How to Make the Financial System Safer for Everyone with Mike Konczal (YouTube)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal explains why banks need higher capital standards to prevent another collapse and discusses the economic reform issues that the Roosevelt Institute will be working on throughout 2014.

Obama's Budget and the Politics of Poverty (To The Point)

Mike Konczal speaks with Warren Olney about how the parties aim to split the budget for anti-poverty programs. The GOP would increase funding for some programs, but at the cost of others.

Paul Ryan Accidentally Makes the Case Against Means-Testing (MSNBC)

When Paul Ryan brings up a child who feels unloved because he gets free lunch instead of a brown-bag lunch, Ned Resnikoff sees an opening for giving all students free lunch.

Together, New Haven Activists and Leaders Strike Back Against Wage Theft (In These Times)

For the first time, local police brought larceny charges against an employer who shortchanged his workers. Melinda Tuhus says these steps will help to protect low-wage workers, including undocumented workers.

Unions and Job Security (PolicyShop)

Matt Bruenig counters a recent argument that unions can't provide real job security anymore. He says the point isn't absolute job security anyway, but safety from firing without cause.

The Foreclosure Nightmare Isn’t Over Yet (MSNBC)

Suzy Khimm reports on one family's five-year fight against foreclosure in Maryland. Policies requiring mediation have kept them in limbo, as have the mortgage servicer's repeated runarounds.

Democrat Says CFTC's Low Budget 'Sucks' (The Hill)

Rep. Sam Farr (D-CA) says that the Commodity Futures Trading Commission's lack of sufficient funding could be very dangerous if it handicaps enforcement, reports Tim Devaney.

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Daily Digest - February 4: A Vision for the Opportunity Community

Feb 4, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Students Rethink How to Build Community (The Nation)

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Students Rethink How to Build Community (The Nation)

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Senior Fellow for Equal Justice Erik Lampmann explains how the Campus Network's new Rethinking Communities initiative, which is evaluating institutions like universities on their local impact, could build a more equitable economy for the future.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Associate Director of Networked Initiatives Alan Smith writes about the theory behind Rethinking Communities' focus on local economies.

Would the U.S. Postal Service Make a Better Banker for the Poor? (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Joshua Brustein takes up the question of postal banking as a method for the unbanked poor to avoid exploitative payday lenders and their ilk. He sees a future in which banks become worse at retail banking, which makes postal banking a solid possible alternative.

Banks Don’t Do Much Banking Anymore—and That’s a Serious Problem (Pacific Standard)

David Dayen writes about how "shadow banks," which include hedge funds, private equity firms, and the like, have taken a primary role in the lending industry as banks do less and less traditional banking. That's a big concern, because shadow banks are far less regulated and expand risk in the entire financial system.

State Could Be First In The Nation To Make Sure Workers Can Take A Vacation (ThinkProgress)

Bryce Covert reports that Washington lawmakers have proposed a bill that would mandate paid vacation for workers who put in at least 20 hours a week at employers with 25 or more employees. There's nothing like this anywhere else in the U.S.

Placed on Unpaid Leave, a Pregnant Employee Finds Hope in a New Law (NYT)

Rachel L. Swarns reports on one of the first cases invoking New York City's new Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. The law is meant to protect workers like Floralba Fernandez Espinal, who was placed on unpaid leave from her retail job when she brought a note from her obstetrician requesting accommodations.

New on Next New Deal

Obama and the GOP Present Two Very Different Paths to Opportunity for All

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch contrasts the messages presented by the president in the State of the Union with Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers’s official GOP response. Both focus on opportunity, but only one emphasizes the need for collective action.

Internet for the Public Interest Needs Protection

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network member Areeba Kamal calls on the Federal Communications Commission to redefine Internet Service Providers as common carriers in the wake of a court decision that struck down net neutrality regulations.

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Daily Digest - December 11: Bipartisan Budgets Mean Everyone's A Little Unhappy

Dec 11, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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There Are Six Big Arguments Against the Volcker Rule. Here’s Why They’re Wrong. (WaPo)

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There Are Six Big Arguments Against the Volcker Rule. Here’s Why They’re Wrong. (WaPo)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal takes on some of the most common arguments against the Volcker Rule, which claim that the rule is either unnecessary or even counterproductive. In the process, he makes his own case for why the rule is in fact needed.

The Most Important Economic Stories of 2013—in 41 Graphs (The Atlantic)

Matthew O'Brien kicks off the end-of-year round-ups with a list of graphs and charts. Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal's contribution shows the year's growth estimates from the Federal Reserve - evidence, Mike says, of a wasted year for returning to full employment.

U.S. Budget Agreement Eases Spending Cuts Over Two Years (Bloomberg)

Heidi Przybyla and Derek Wallbank explain the first bipartisan budget deal since 1986. The deal doesn't extend unemployment benefits and it saves money by increasing federal employees' pension contributions, but it's a deal, and it's likely to prevent another government shutdown.

Boeing Looks Around, and a State Worries (NYT)

Kirk Johnson looks at Boeing's options after the machinist union's rejection of a new contract that would have frozen pensions and harmed future union members. State after state is courting Boeing with special deals, even though it means passing up tax revenue from a massive airplane factory.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch explains that the Machinists Local 751 rejected Boeing's proposed contract to take a stand for what middle class jobs should look like today and into the future.

Is Service Work Today Worse Than Being a Household Servant? (AJAM)

David Cay Johnston poses this fascinating question along with a comparison of compensation for household cooks in the 1910s and modern fast-food cooks. Few would want to return to the Gilded Age, but many service-sector jobs had more security and stability then.

How The Residents Of SeaTac’s Lives Will Change With A $15 Minimum Wage (ThinkProgress)

Bryce Covert speaks to workers at the airport in SeaTac, Washington who will be getting a raise on January 1 thanks to the town's new minimum wage increase. Even as they plan how they will use the money, they are just as excited for the provision of the new law guaranteeing paid sick leave.

Why Every City Needs Its Own Minimum Wage (The Atlantic Cities)

Richard Florida explains an interesting model for calculating local minimum wages based on a region's median wage. He argues that a minimum wage between 50 and 60 percent of the regional median wage would be a better reflection of local cost of living.

New on Next New Deal

Conservatives and Progressives Agree: Congress Should Not Cut Unemployment Benefits

Nell Abernathy, Program Manager for the Roosevelt Institute's Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative, lays out the economic argument for maintaining unemployment insurance almost entirely in quotes from conservatives, demonstrating that this isn't only a progressive cause.

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Daily Digest - December 9: Stepping Up When Congress Won't Raise the Wage

Dec 9, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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The Fight for Fair Wages (All In With Chris Hayes)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren discusses the possibility of a minimum wage increase, and whether Congress will do anything about it. Even if Congress won't act, he's excited by the cities and states that are pushing ahead of higher wages already.

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The Fight for Fair Wages (All In With Chris Hayes)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren discusses the possibility of a minimum wage increase, and whether Congress will do anything about it. Even if Congress won't act, he's excited by the cities and states that are pushing ahead of higher wages already.

The Volcker Rule is Nearly Finished. Here’s How We’ll Know if it’s Any Good. (WaPo)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal looks at key areas that will indicate whether the Volcker Rule is strong enough to regulate banks as intended. He emphasizes enforcement, since this rule aims to cause dramatic cultural and institutional change on Wall Street.

What is Deficit Mania Doing on the News Pages? (MoJo)

Kevin Drum points out that when reporters take for granted that Congress should prioritize deficit reduction above all else, they aren't doing their job. There's another side to this story, which considers the unprecedented nature of deficit cuts in a recession.

Wanted: More Unemployment (NYT)

Binyamin Appelbaum says that this month's job report isn't anything to be happy about. Since labor force participation has stayed basically stagnant while the unemployment rate drops, we're actually seeing people drop out of the labor force entirely.

Yes, McDonald's Can Do Better (TAP)

Catherine Ruetschlin writes about a new report she wrote with Amy Traub, published by Demos, which shows the math for how Wal-Mart and other low-wage employers could raise wages without passing on costs to consumers.

‘From Bean to Cup,’ Starbucks Labor Action Heats Up (In These Times)

Michelle Chen reports on supply chain-wide labor activism at Starbucks, where baristas are joining in solidarity with factory workers who produce their cups. The factory is pushing to allow temp workers at the factory, which would cut union negotiating power.

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Daily Digest - November 13: Senator Warren Would've Voted For Dodd-Frank, And Then Some

Nov 13, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Elizabeth Warren vs. the Democratic Elites (All In With Chris Hayes)

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Elizabeth Warren vs. the Democratic Elites (All In With Chris Hayes)

Chris Hayes discusses Senator Warren's keynote at a Roosevelt Institute and Americans for Financial Reform conference on financial reform yesterday. He argues that she needs to convince the rest of the Democrats to adopt her views of the banking industry.

  • Roosevelt Take: Senator Warren's speech aired live on C-SPAN 2, and you can watch the archived video here.

Elizabeth Warren’s Populist Insurgency Enters Next Phase (Salon)

David Dayen looks at the new report on financial reform from the Roosevelt Institute and Americans for Financial Reform. He says the proposals aren't just about regulations, but about what economy we want for our citizens.

  • Roosevelt Take: You can read the report, "An Unfinished Mission: Making Wall Street Work For Us," here.

Gary Gensler's Successor Has His Work Cut Out for Him (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Matthew Philips thinks that Timothy Massad, who has been nominated to be the next chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, is well equipped to take on the difficult challenge of enforcing the regulations Gary Gensler pushed through.

Yellen’s Challenge at the Fed: Speaking Persuasively to Investors (NYT)

Binyamin Appelbaum suggests that Janet Yellen's work begins this week with her confirmation hearings. As someone who has pushed the Fed to more clearly articulate its plans, she'll need to start doing just that in front of the Senate Banking Committee.

Two Fed Officials Say Aggressive Policy Action Still Needed (Reuters)

Jonathan Spicer and David Bailey report on statements by the Presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks of Atlanta and Minneapolis which emphasize the need for full employment. Both think that the Fed needs to retain accommodative policies for now.

Occupy Wall Street Activists Buy $15m of Americans' Personal Debt (The Guardian)

Adam Gabbatt explains how the Rolling Jubilee managed to eliminate so much medical debt so quickly. The secondary debt market sells debts for much less than the amount owed, which meant the program was able to have a much larger impact than planned.

The Government’s Human Price Scanners (WaPo)

Emily Wax-Thibodeaux reports on the work of "economic assistants" at the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, who travel the country to record the prices of goods. By recording every detail, like differences in vet fees at night, these relatively unknown workers help to create the Consumer Price Index.

New on Next New Deal

What Do the Millennials Want From the Affordable Care Act?

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Senior Fellow for Health Care Anisha Hedge says that Millennials aren't interested in the ultra-partisan arguments for or against the ACA. They're more interested in how the law works, and how they can get health insurance.

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Daily Digest - November 1: Going Further Than Dodd-Frank

Nov 1, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Four Intriguing Ideas for How to Fix the Banks (Bloomberg Businessweek)

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Four Intriguing Ideas for How to Fix the Banks (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Peter Coy speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal about the upcoming report from the Roosevelt Institute and Americans for Financial Reform, "An Unfinished Mission: Making Wall Street Work for Us." He previews four of the papers from the report, including Mike's.

  • Roosevelt Institute Event: This report with be presented at a conference in Washington, DC on November 12, featuring a keynote from Senator Elizabeth Warren. For more information, click here.

Southwest Takes the Legal Battlefront on Abortion (Women's eNews)

Reshmi Kaur Oberoi looks at the current fights over abortion access in the southwestern United States. She references Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn's recent white paper on Title X in discussing access to reproductive care for Hispanic women in Texas.

  • Roosevelt Take: Andrea's white paper, "The Title X Factor: Why the Health of America's Women Depends on More Funding for Family Planning," argues that increasing funding for Title X will strengthen the Affordable Care Act, especially in the earlier phases of implementation.

How States Taken Over by the GOP in 2010 Have Been Quietly Screwing Over the American Worker (The Nation)

Zoë Carpenter looks at an Economic Policy Institute report on state-level attacks on labor. This coordinated campaign of cookie-cutter style legislation is hurting workers of all sorts - unionized and nonunionized, public and private.

Newt’s Revenge: Child Labor Makes a Comeback (Salon)

Josh Eidelson points out that the attack on labor has included rollbacks of child labor laws in four states. The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), which coordinates much of this legislation, apparently thinks attacking adult workers' rights isn't enough.

A War on the Poor (NYT)

Paul Krugman asks why the Republican party has shifted so far away from supporting programs that help the needy. He blames a combination of market ideology, an awareness of the changing racial dynamics of this country, and libertarian fantasy.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Jeff Madrick appeared on Countdown with Keith Olbermann to discuss this topic back in 2011.

War Brews on Spending Cuts (MSNBC)

Suzy Khimm reports on the coalition working to protect "non-defense" discretionary spending. The budget negotiations are primarily over this category of spending, which includes everything from mental health care to Census data collection to Head Start.

New on Next New Deal

Show Your Invisible Hand: Why the SEC Should Make Corporations Disclose Political Contributions

Roosevelt Institute Director of Research Susan Holmberg argues that requiring corporations to disclose their political contributions is good for investors and for the companies, which risk executives using political contributions for their own good.

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Daily Digest - October 31: Low Taxes Carry Heavy Burdens

Oct 31, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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The Great American Ripoff: The High Cost of Low Taxes (Bill Moyers)

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The Great American Ripoff: The High Cost of Low Taxes (Bill Moyers)

Joshua Holland argues that low taxes in the United States translate to hugely disproportionate out-of-pocket costs for things that would be covered by the social safety net in other countries. That also means there's nothing to catch people in crisis.

End Corporate Welfare for McDonald's. Better Yet, Raise the Minimum Wage (The Guardian)

Sadhbh Walshe looks at the latest story about McDonald's workers seeking public assistance, which revolves around a phone call to its McResource line. She argues that if McDonald's needs to refer their workers to Medicaid and SNAP, they should be paying better wages.

Another Temporary Funding Bill? (MSNBC)

Jane C. Timm reports that a grand bargain is pretty much out of the question, and at least one Senator thinks that a continuing resolution through the end of the fiscal year is likely. That would bring us to a month before the 2014 elections, which would be rough timing for a budget fight.

C.F.T.C. Approves Tighter Commodity Trading Rules (NYT)

Alexandra Stevenson reports on new rules from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, designed to protect client money from brokerage firms going bust. After a 2011 case that left customers $1.6 billion short, the need for these rules is pretty clear.

Paypal to Government: Be More Like Us (WaPo)

Lydia DePillis examines a report from Paypal that suggests how government should handle the mobile payment industry. The company calls on regulators to throw out their old methodology, which she thinks is hugely unlikely.

The New Futurism (The New Yorker)

James Surowiecki looks at human-capital contracts, which allow people to raise funds for businesses or education in exchange for a percentage of future earnings over a number of years. The principle is similar to income-based repayment on student loans.

New on Next New Deal

Maine's Lobster Industry is Dying, But Government Can Help Save It

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network student John Tranfaglia calls for government intervention in Maine's lobster industry. Instead of criticizing the Canadian government for subsidizing lobster processing, Governor LePage should figure out ways to attract lobster processors to Maine.

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Failing Low-Income Students: How Targeted College Information Could Improve Enrollment

Aug 27, 2013Asha M. Fereydouni

A focus on student loan rates isn't enough to help low-income students. The government needs to improve how it helps these students get enrolled in the first place.

A focus on student loan rates isn't enough to help low-income students. The government needs to improve how it helps these students get enrolled in the first place.

President Obama recently signed a bipartisan bill that ties student loan interest rates to the financial markets, which allows this year’s undergraduates to borrow at 3.9 percent interest -- nearly half of what they would have paid if Congress had failed to act. As a recent college graduate, I, like many of my peers, was very excited to learn of this decision. However, while the federal government has done great work to help those students who are already enrolled in college, it is effectively failing those students who come from families at or below the poverty line.

A recent Brookings Institute and Princeton University study notes that the federal government is spending around $1 billion per year on programs to help low-income students. Despite this funding, the four major college prep programs, Upward Bound, Upward Bound Math-Science, Student Support Services, and Talent Search (known collectively as TRIO), have had “no major effects on college enrollment or completion.” The study shows that students from low-income backgrounds who earn college degrees are 80 percent less likely to be poor. Unfortunately, Brookings and Princeton report that only 34 percent of low-income students actually enroll in college. Of that 34 percent, only 11 percent graduate.

The federal government is spending $1 billion with little or no return, policymakers are focused on other issues, and hardworking low-income students are paying the price. The government needs to refocus its efforts and provide targeted information to low-income students.

The closest thing to such a resource has been developed and marketed by the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau (CFPB). The CFPB created an 11-part online roadmap called the "Financial Aid Comparison Shopper" to help students navigate the college application process.

This tool, while it has some virtues, still effectively fails low-income college students. The first stages of the CFPB tool, “apply for college” and “research schools,” which would be most relevant to low-income applicants unsure about their college prospects and financial options, merely link to a page hosted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).

The NCES page (which looks like it was made in the early 2000s) asks visitors to type in the name of a school, or search by state, zip code, level of award, or institution type. The burden is on the student to search for the right kinds of schools in the right states. There is little guidance as to what kind of school will be the best fit for a given student. By linking to an old-fashioned page with untargeted information, the CFPB is not providing real guidance to low-income applicants. The impacts of this are severe.

Caroline Hoxby, an economics professor at Stanford University, studied 40,000 low-income students and found that simply providing students with an informational tool-kit with targeted information about various colleges and their respective costs made students 53 percent more likely to apply to a peer institution (an institution where the low-income students were just as qualified as their high-income counterparts), 78 percent more likely to be admitted, and 50 percent more likely to enroll.

If the CFPB seeks to remedy the low rates of low-income students attending college, the site needs to be re-worked. It needs to ask students to input specific details about their academic and financial backgrounds and then present a list of potential schools based on those facts.

But the burden is not just on the CFPB. This failure to reach low-income students is a much larger problem that can be seen within all of the federal government’s billion dollar efforts to help potential college students. The untargeted resources transcend every single federal effort.  

While the reduction of student loan rates is a major bipartisan achievement with real-world implications, there is still much to be done to increase enrollment and graduation rates among low-income students. The CFPB needs to update its tool, the Department of Education needs to revamp its efforts, and we must not forget those low-income students who have the grades and the drive, but just need a little more guidance in the college search process.

Asha M. Fereydouni is an alumnus of the University of California, Davis and the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network, and is currently a graduate student at Oxford. 

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