Daily Digest - September 2: The U.S. Economy Needs Immigrant Workers to Thrive

Sep 2, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Just Who Did Build America? (Melissa Harris-Perry)

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Just Who Did Build America? (Melissa Harris-Perry)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren says that if the Republican Party is to survive, it needs to accept that immigrants continue to be key players in U.S. economic success.

Want Better, Smaller Government? Hire Another Million Federal Bureaucrats. (WaPo)

John J. Dilulio Jr. writes that the "Leviathan by proxy," the immense bureaucracies administered by state government, contractors, and nonprofits, just can't work as effectively as more federal hires.

What Happens When Health Plans Compete (NYT)

A new study shows that premiums drop when competition increases on the health insurance exchanges, writes Austin Frakt. He says the challenge is luring in those competitors.

What Would a Real ‘Right to Work’ Look Like? (Notes on a Theory)

David Kaib suggests two options for truly worker-friendly policies that could be attached to the name "right to work" instead of the anti-union free rider laws currently referred to as such.

Happy Labor Day. Are Unions Dead? (TNR)

Jonathan Cohn speaks to labor strategist and researcher Rich Yeselson about today's challenges for organized labor. Yeselson points out that union contracts don't stifle innovation; some companies just aren't innovating.

At Market Basket, the Benevolent Boss Is Back. Should We Cheer? (In These Times)

Julia Wong questions the labor-focused narrative of the recent Market Basket strikes. A manager-led strike doesn't guarantee that average workers will maintain their good wages and benefits.

Columbia University E-mail Reveals Disdain for Anti-Rape Campus Movement (The Nation)

George Joseph shares an email from the Columbia University Title IX compliance officer which demonstrates just how difficult it is for campus activists to be seen as equal partners.

  • Roosevelt Take: Campus Network members Hannah Zhang and Hayley Brundige have both called for student involvement in setting rape prevention policies on campus.

Fast Food Workers Plan Biggest U.S. Strike to Date Over Minimum Wage (The Guardian)

Thursday's strike will be the largest yet. Dominic Rushe ties the strike to lawsuits defining McDonalds as a joint employer with its franchisees, which would make unionizing easier.

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Daily Digest - August 29: A Rising Minimum Wage Lifts All Boats

Aug 29, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

There will not be a new Daily Digest on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day. The Daily Digest will return on Tuesday, September 2.

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Who Stands to Benefit from San Diego’s Minimum Wage Hike (Voice of San Diego)

There will not be a new Daily Digest on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day. The Daily Digest will return on Tuesday, September 2.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

Who Stands to Benefit from San Diego’s Minimum Wage Hike (Voice of San Diego)

Lisa Halverstadt speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt about her research team's estimate that 172,000 workers could get a raise from San Diego's minimum wage hike.

The Biggest Tax Scam Ever (Rolling Stone)

Tim Dickinson looks at the range of multinational tax avoidance strategies in use today, from inversions to offshoring. It's all legal, he says, but the law itself is broken.

De Blasio Zeroes in on Expanding Living Wage (Capital New York)

New York City's mayor looks to require more businesses, including retail tenants of subsidized developments, to pay a living wage, report Dana Rubinstein and Sally Goldenberg.

Market Basket's Popular CEO Arthur T Goes Rogue and Wins – Now What? (The Guardian)

After months of employee protests on his behalf, Market Basket's former CEO has bought out his cousins to regain control. Jana Kasperkevic says he'll face new challenges from shareholders.

AFL-CIO’s Trumka: Democrats Need New Economic Team in 2016 (WSJ)

The labor union president wants 2016 candidates to avoid economics advisors who have participated in the revolving door of government and Wall Street, reports Eric Morath.

Americans Foresee Unending Economic Doom (Vox)

Danielle Kurtzleben looks at a new study from Rutgers which shows that a growing number of Americans believe the last recession permanently scarred the economy and that government can't help.

Pregnant Women Just Earned More Workplace Rights in Illinois (The Nation)

The new law establishes civil rights protections for pregnant workers, which will help them to stay in the workplace if they want to, writes Michelle Chen.

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Daily Digest - August 28: Read This Before Your Internet Goes Out

Aug 28, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Time Warner Cable Internet Outage Affects Millions (Vanity Fair)

Kia Makarechi speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford, who says that lack of competition and oversight leads to problems like yesterday's Internet outage on the East Coast.

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Time Warner Cable Internet Outage Affects Millions (Vanity Fair)

Kia Makarechi speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford, who says that lack of competition and oversight leads to problems like yesterday's Internet outage on the East Coast.

How Obamacare Can End Bloated CEO Pay (Fortune)

A little-known provision in the Affordable Care Act closes the executive performance pay loophole, but just for insurance companies, writes Sarah Anderson.

The Sorry State of Bank Apologies (ProPublica)

Non-specific corporate apologies are becoming de rigueur in settlements with banks, but Jesse Eisinger says these apologies aren't enough to resolve the banks' bad behavior.

The Expanding World of Poverty Capitalism (NYT)

Thomas Edsall defines poverty capitalism as the shifting of the costs of essential government onto the poor, as in offender-funded law enforcement systems in places like Ferguson, MO.

Court Finds FedEx Drivers are Employees, not Independent Contractors (Sacramento Business Journal)

A federal appeals court's ruling on this class-action suit may require FedEx to pay 2,300 drivers millions of dollars in back pay, uniform and truck costs, and more, writes Kathy Robertson.

40 Percent of Restaurant Workers Live in Near-Poverty (MoJo)

Tom Philpott looks at a new report from the Economic Policy Institute on poverty in the restaurant industry, which shows stagnant wages, few benefits, and limited opportunities for advancement.

Caught on Tape: What Mitch McConnell Complained About to a Roomful of Billionaires (The Nation)

In this exclusive, Lauren Windsor reports on a speech Senator McConnell made at a Koch brothers gathering, in which he stated his intent to defund, among other things, Dodd-Frank financial reform.

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Daily Digest - August 27: The Known Unknowns of Unemployment

Aug 27, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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A New Reason to Question the Official Unemployment Rate (NYT)

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A New Reason to Question the Official Unemployment Rate (NYT)

A new report says that unemployment data has become less accurate over the past 20 years, in part because of declining survey response rates, writes David Leonhardt.

Objecting to Austerity, French Style (New Yorker)

John Cassidy looks at the implosion of the French government this week, as three ministers, including the economy minister, have been pushed out for their objection to austerity policies.

Money for Nothing: Mincome Experiment Could Pay Dividends 40 Years On (AJAM)

Recently analyzed data from a 1970s Canadian experiment in guaranteed basic income shows far-reaching benefits in health and education, writes Benjamin Shingler.

Companies Say ‘No Way’ to ‘Say on Pay’ (WSJ)

Emily Chasan examines the companies that have repeatedly failed Say-on-Pay shareholder votes on their executives' pay packages, and what they have in common.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Holmberg looks at how Say-on-Pay can curb sky-high executive compensation.

SEIU Wins Election To Represent Minnesota Home Care Workers (HuffPo)

Dave Jamieson says that yesterday's vote, which created Minnesota's largest public-sector bargaining unit in history, shows that unions are not letting Harris v. Quinn slow organizing.

Burger King’s Supremely American Habit (MSNBC)

Timothy Noah points out that Burger King, which might be planning an inversion to avoid U.S. corporate income taxes, already pushes as many costs as possible off its parent company.

Mayor Garcetti Pitching New Minimum Wage Plan to Business Groups (LA Times)

Catherine Saillant reports on business opposition to the Los Angeles mayor's plan, which would raise the city's minimum wage to $13.50 over three years and then tie it to local inflation.

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Daily Digest - August 26: Corporations Shouldn't Get a Free Pass on Tax-Dodging

Aug 26, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Cutting the Corporate Tax Would Make Other Problems Grow (NYT)

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Cutting the Corporate Tax Would Make Other Problems Grow (NYT)

Jared Bernstein counters recent suggestions for eliminating the U.S. corporate income tax by pointing out the extreme difficulty of capturing that revenue through personal income taxes.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz proposes more viable reforms to the corporate income tax.

Stigmatizing Poor Kids in Our Public Schools (PolicyShop)

Matt Bruenig suggests that free lunch at school is the target of so much ire because it's seen as a "poor people thing," even though public schools are themselves a welfare program.

When Workplace Training Programs Actually Hinder Workers (The Nation)

The low-structure, free-choice-based model of the Workforce Investment Act limits its effectiveness, writes Michelle Chen, since it doesn't allow for prioritizing funding for the best training programs.

Another GOP State May Be Signing up for Medicaid, and the Reason is Obvious (LA Times)

Michael Hiltzik says the money being left on the table is finally proving enough to get Republican governors like Wyoming's to push for Medicaid expansion even though it's part of Obamacare.

Back to School, and to Widening Inequality (Robert Reich)

Kids who live in poor neighborhoods are at a disadvantage when it comes to school funding, writes Robert Reich, so economic inequality hobbles these students from an early age.

Central Banks to Lawmakers: You Try Growing the Economy (WaPo)

Ylan Q. Mui reports that the general attitude coming out of the annual Jackson Hole gathering was that monetary policy can only do so much, and legislatures need to step it up.

Cities Can Ease Homelessness With Storage Units (City Lab)

Kriston Capps looks at an innovative program in San Diego that creates stability by providing homeless people with transitional storage where they can safely leave their belongings each day.

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Daily Digest - August 25: The Mortgage Crisis, Act 2

Aug 25, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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You Thought the Mortgage Crisis Was Over? It's About to Flare Up Again (TNR)

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You Thought the Mortgage Crisis Was Over? It's About to Flare Up Again (TNR)

With a large number of mortgage relief measures scheduled to end in the coming year, David Dayen says that many foreclosures will seem as though they were only deferred from 2008.

Why the Robots Might Not Take Our Jobs After All: They Lack Common Sense (NYT)

Neil Irwin reports on MIT labor scholar David Autor's new paper, which argues that robots can't handle common-sense decision making, so they'll only be able to replace certain kinds of jobs.

  • Roosevelt Take: Autor presented a version of this scenario in his video speculation for the Next American Economy project.

Middle Class is Excluded from America's Economic 'Recovery' (The Guardian)

Heidi Moore points out that the recovery isn't much of one for most Americans, and the economists who gathered in Jackson Hole this weekend can't do much to fix that.

Fed Chair Cautious on Timing of Rate Rises, Questions Health of Job Market (AJAM)

Janet Yellen's first speech at the Jackson Hole conference defended her approach, arguing that caution is still needed because the long-term effects of the recession aren't yet clear.

Could America Accept Another FDR? (WaPo)

Fred Hiatt wonders whether modern political discourse and journalism would permit another person like Franklin D. Roosevelt, with his illness and complicated family, to make it to the White House.

Middle Class Households' Wealth Fell 35 Percent from 2005 to 2011 (Vox)

Danielle Kurtzleben reports on new data from the Census Bureau, which shows a dramatic change in U.S. households' net worth, particularly for the bottom three quintiles.

New on Next New Deal

The Ferguson Challenge to the Libertarians

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal says the profit-motivated criminal justice system in Ferguson, heavy on court fees and fines, looks a lot like the libertarian ideal of privatization – and it isn't working.

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Daily Digest - August 22: Sunshine the Cure for Tax Avoidance?

Aug 22, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Shareholders, Public Deserve Tax Transparency (WaPo)

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Shareholders, Public Deserve Tax Transparency (WaPo)

Catherine Rampell argues that requiring publicly traded companies to make their tax returns public would cause companies, over time, to invest fewer resources in tax avoidance.

Homeowner Help Remains Elusive in $16.5bn Bank of America Fine (The Guardian)

David Dayen says homeowners shouldn't count on relief from bank settlements: banks will choose to "pay" as much of the penalty as permitted without helping homeowners.

Injustice in Ferguson, Long Before Michael Brown (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Peter Coy looks at how the frequently racist origins of the St. Louis area's municipal fragmentation created the inequalities that people in Ferguson are protesting today.

How a Part-Time Pay Penalty Hits Working Mothers (NYT)

Claire Cain Miller looks at a new analysis from Harvard economist Claudia Goldin, which shows that across the board, working fewer hours leads to a lower wage in the same job.

Obama Alums Accused of Selling Out (MSNBC)

Many Democrats are particularly concerned by influential Obama campaign staff working in roles that are not supportive of unions, writes Alex Seitz-Ward.

Low-Paid Jobs Now Pay Even Worse Than Before The Recovery Began (ThinkProgress)

Bryce Covert writes that the worst of the declining wages lie in particular sectors like food service, home and care workers, and retail, which employ many low-wage workers.

New on Next New Deal

Campus Network Looks Ahead for Policy Engagement

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Director Joelle Gamble considers the Network's nine years of successes, and lays out some of the goals for the year ahead.

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Daily Digest - August 21: Time to Consider the Mortgage Deduction?

Aug 21, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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How a Widely Beloved Tax Deduction Really Just Benefits the Well-Off and Exacerbates Inequality (TAP)

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How a Widely Beloved Tax Deduction Really Just Benefits the Well-Off and Exacerbates Inequality (TAP)

The mortgage interest deduction primarily benefits those who make at least $100,000 a year, and dwarfs funding for housing programs for the poor, writes Alex Ulam.

  • Roosevelt Take: In his latest white paper on tax reform, Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz suggests changes to the mortgage interest deduction that would make it more equitable.

What Would Real Economic Justice Look Like in Ferguson? (The Nation)

Michelle Chen reports on organized labor's involvement in Ferguson, MO, where a millennial labor group called Future Fighters is asking protesters want they want their community to look like.

Fed Dissenters Increasingly Vocal About Inflation Fears (NYT)

The newly released minutes from the Federal Reserve's July meeting show that some Fed officials feel the central bank has done all it can to improve the economy, writes Binyamin Appelbaum.

CEOs are Dumb When it Comes to This (MarketWatch)

Simon Constable reports on a new study that shows that stock option compensation isn't really considered in dollars: CEOs tend to get the same number of options regardless of the stock's value.

Why Bank of America Probably Won’t End Up Actually Paying US$17B in Mortgage Securities Settlement (Financial Post)

Consumer relief as negotiated in this settlement and others rarely cost the banks much at all, says Jeff Horwitz. But with few other sources of consumer relief, advocates welcome this one.

The Latest Attack on Labor, From The Group That Brought Us ‘Harris v. Quinn’ (In These Times)

Moshe Marvit explains the National Right to Work Committee's latest tactic, which aims to end exclusive representation in public sector unions and weaken collective bargaining.

New on Next New Deal

Mean and Lean Local Government

In his video speculation for the Next American Economy project, Stefaan Verlhurst, Co-Founder of GovLab, projects how municipal governments might shift tactics to take advantage of broader resources.

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Stefaan Verlhurst: Mean and Lean Local Government

Aug 21, 2014

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Stefaan Verhulst of GovLab speculates on future municipal policy that allows cities to do more with less.

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Stefaan Verhulst of GovLab speculates on future municipal policy that allows cities to do more with less.

Stefaan Verhulst, Co-Founder and Chief Research and Development Officer of GovLab, speculates on future municipal policy that allows cities to do more with less. Combining open-source data with crowd-sourcing networks, city government will be able to connect experts with public problems more efficiently. An enlightened municipal agenda can help battle the recent governance deficit and lack of government trust rising in the US, Stefaan said.

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Daily Digest - August 20: Inequality Among Roots of Ferguson Unrest

Aug 20, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Ferguson's Race Injustices Have Their Roots in Economic Inequality (The Guardian)

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Ferguson's Race Injustices Have Their Roots in Economic Inequality (The Guardian)

Suzanne McGee ties the situation in Ferguson, MO to the severe economic inequality facing the Black community in the U.S., which she says limits Black access to political power as well.

Meet the Ordinary People Who Are Mobilizing Around Monetary Policy (WaPo)

Activist groups concerned with democratizing the discussion of monetary policy are sending low-wage workers to speak a Federal Reserve conference in Wyoming. Ylan Q. Mui reports.

The Tax Dodge That Has Plagued the U.S. for More Than a Decade (The Atlantic)

Joe Pinsker looks at the history of companies looking to reincorporate abroad to dodge U.S. corporate income taxes, and explains how the process has changed (and yet not) in the past decade.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz proposes a full slate of corporate income tax reforms in his latest white paper.

Lagging Demand, Not Unemployability, Is Why Long-term Unemployment Remains So High (EPI)

In a new report, Josh Bivens and Heidi Shierholz argue that long-term unemployment is still a component of cyclical weakness in the economy from the recession, rather than a structural shut-out.

How to Save the Net: Don’t Give In to Big ISPs (Wired)

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings calls on the Federal Communications Commission to expand its focus to regulate the relationships between companies like his and the Internet service providers.

OSHA fines company $1M for violating truckers' hours-of-service rule (The Hill)

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's fine is about protecting workers and the public, reports Tim Devaney. Trucker rest rules are in the limelight after high-profile crashes.

San Diego Defies Mayor, Raises Minimum Wage (CNN Money)

Katie Lobosco reports that the city council overturned the mayor's veto, approving a gradual minimum wage hike that ties the wage to inflation, as well as paid sick leave.

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