Daily Digest - November 13: Senator Warren Would've Voted For Dodd-Frank, And Then Some

Nov 13, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Elizabeth Warren vs. the Democratic Elites (All In With Chris Hayes)

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Elizabeth Warren vs. the Democratic Elites (All In With Chris Hayes)

Chris Hayes discusses Senator Warren's keynote at a Roosevelt Institute and Americans for Financial Reform conference on financial reform yesterday. He argues that she needs to convince the rest of the Democrats to adopt her views of the banking industry.

  • Roosevelt Take: Senator Warren's speech aired live on C-SPAN 2, and you can watch the archived video here.

Elizabeth Warren’s Populist Insurgency Enters Next Phase (Salon)

David Dayen looks at the new report on financial reform from the Roosevelt Institute and Americans for Financial Reform. He says the proposals aren't just about regulations, but about what economy we want for our citizens.

  • Roosevelt Take: You can read the report, "An Unfinished Mission: Making Wall Street Work For Us," here.

Gary Gensler's Successor Has His Work Cut Out for Him (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Matthew Philips thinks that Timothy Massad, who has been nominated to be the next chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, is well equipped to take on the difficult challenge of enforcing the regulations Gary Gensler pushed through.

Yellen’s Challenge at the Fed: Speaking Persuasively to Investors (NYT)

Binyamin Appelbaum suggests that Janet Yellen's work begins this week with her confirmation hearings. As someone who has pushed the Fed to more clearly articulate its plans, she'll need to start doing just that in front of the Senate Banking Committee.

Two Fed Officials Say Aggressive Policy Action Still Needed (Reuters)

Jonathan Spicer and David Bailey report on statements by the Presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks of Atlanta and Minneapolis which emphasize the need for full employment. Both think that the Fed needs to retain accommodative policies for now.

Occupy Wall Street Activists Buy $15m of Americans' Personal Debt (The Guardian)

Adam Gabbatt explains how the Rolling Jubilee managed to eliminate so much medical debt so quickly. The secondary debt market sells debts for much less than the amount owed, which meant the program was able to have a much larger impact than planned.

The Government’s Human Price Scanners (WaPo)

Emily Wax-Thibodeaux reports on the work of "economic assistants" at the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, who travel the country to record the prices of goods. By recording every detail, like differences in vet fees at night, these relatively unknown workers help to create the Consumer Price Index.

New on Next New Deal

What Do the Millennials Want From the Affordable Care Act?

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Senior Fellow for Health Care Anisha Hedge says that Millennials aren't interested in the ultra-partisan arguments for or against the ACA. They're more interested in how the law works, and how they can get health insurance.

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Daily Digest - November 12: Populism On The Rise

Nov 12, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Hillary's Nightmare? A Democratic Party That Realizes Its Soul Lies With Elizabeth Warren (TNR)

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Hillary's Nightmare? A Democratic Party That Realizes Its Soul Lies With Elizabeth Warren (TNR)

Noam Scheiber explains why Senator Warren is at the heart of the debate about the Democrats' identity. The argument between populists and Wall Street allies could be the central question in the Democratic primaries for 2016.

  • Roosevelt Take: Senator Warren will give the keynote address at "An Unfinished Mission: Making Wall Street Work For Us," where the Roosevelt Institute and Americans for Financial Reform will launch a new report on the policy questions that remain within and beyond Dodd-Frank.

House Dems Can Block GOP Food Stamp Cuts—By Killing the Farm Bill (MoJo)

Erika Eichelberger suggests that the best way for Democrats to stop cuts to food stamps would be to vote with the far right. If the farm bill fails, funding should continue at the same level, which makes voting with those who want even more cuts the way to go.

Could There be a Bipartisan Truce on Infrastructure? (MSNBC)

Suzy Khimm suggests that infrastructure could be one of the only issues in the budget negotiations that already has bipartisan support. The president's $50 billion infrastructure plan seems unlikely, but smaller projects have already passed even as the GOP yells about spending.

How Badly Has the U.S. Economy Been Damaged? (The New Yorker)

John Cassidy looks at a research paper by three economists at the Federal Reserve, which suggests that the recession has harmed the economy's capacity for growth. High unemployment and reduced capital investment may have cost up to seven percent of GDP.

“If You Like Your Current Health Insurance, You Can Keep It”: DeLong Analytical Failure Weblogging, Chapter CCXI (The Equitablog)

Brad DeLong looks at the reasons that some people are losing their current insurance under the Affordable Care Act. Of his four reasons, three are goals of reform, so it seems strange that those reasons are getting so much negative attention.

New on Next New Deal

Story Wars: Why Personal Stories Are Shaping the Health Care Battleground

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch argues that media bias means only certain (mostly negative) stories about the Affordable Care Act are getting serious attention. Supporters of the law need to ensure that the positive stories get covered, too.

"The Kids Aren't Alright": Millennials Demand Economic Stability for all LBGTQ People, Now

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Senior Fellow for Equal Justice Erik Lampmann says that Millennials can't understand why the GOP opposes the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, but that doesn't mean they have to accept a flawed version of the bill.

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Daily Digest - November 8: Worker Safety in Workers' Hands Isn't Enough

Nov 8, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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It’s Not Safe Out There (In These Times)

Leo Gerard writes about the serious dangers workers faced due to a perpetually understaffed Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The agency is so shorthanded that it frequently relies on workers to report safety violations despite legitimate fears of retaliation.

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It’s Not Safe Out There (In These Times)

Leo Gerard writes about the serious dangers workers faced due to a perpetually understaffed Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The agency is so shorthanded that it frequently relies on workers to report safety violations despite legitimate fears of retaliation.

$10 Minimum Wage Proposal Has Obama’s Backing (NYT)

Catherine Rampell and Steven Greenhouse report on the White House's announcement, which gave the President's support to a bill that would also tie the minimum wage to inflation. The House rejected that bill earlier this year, but apparently it's not over yet.

15 Under-the-Radar Progressive Wins of Election 2013 (Bill Moyers)

Moyers & Company reports on the less publicized victories for progressives this year. Highlights include mayoral races in cities beyond New York and Boston, anti-fracking ordinances in three Colorado cities, and Royal Oak, Michigan's ban on LGBT discrimination.

Blaming Conventions (Washington Monthly)

Ed Kilgore considers whether it really matters if candidates are chosen by primary or convention, since some are blaming the convention selection of Ken Cuccinelli for the GOP's loss in Virginia's gubernatorial race. He says it doesn't make a difference.

New Help for the Poor: Cash Grants, Through a Web Site (The New Yorker)

Sasha Abramsky looks at the website Benevolent, which helps people solicit funds for very specific needs. He contrasts the site's success at fundraising around stories with the often strong political opposition to cash grants.

The More Central Bankers Explain Themselves, the More Confused the Markets Get (Quartz)

Jason Karaian asks why the Federal Reserve hasn't been sticking to its philosophy of "forward guidance," meant to minimize market uncertainty. It seems that analysts are taking central bankers' statements as the word of god, even though nothing is set in stone.

New on Next New Deal

Progressivism in America: Are We Opening a New Chapter in Our Book of Self-Government?

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Hyde Park Resident Historian David Woolner suggests that this week's election results are not just a rejection of the hard right, but a return to one of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's ideas regarding faith in government to reach united purposes.

  • Roosevelt Take: David Woolner is one of many speakers at "Progressivism in America: Past, Present, and Future," a conference cosponsored by the Roosevelt Institute and University College Dublin's Clinton Institute, today and tomorrow. The event is being livestreamed from Dublin.

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Daily Digest - November 7: Remember The Last Time Wall Street Invested in Housing?

Nov 7, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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The Best City for the Next Generation of Artists Just Might Be Jackson (Atlantic Cities)

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The Best City for the Next Generation of Artists Just Might Be Jackson (Atlantic Cities)

Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz continues her series on cities where Millennials can succeed. She reports on the art scene in Jackson, MI, where young creatives are taking advantage of cheap available space to try new projects.

Wall Street Slumlords’ Outrageous New Scheme: How They Could Wreck the Economy Again (Salon)

David Dayen reports on Wall Street's newest housing-based investment vehicle, which are backed by rental payments. Ratings agencies have given these securities triple-A ratings, but mortgage-backed securities had the same rating.

The One Mortgage Fix Washington Isn’t Talking About (ProPublica)

Jesse Eisenger considers the pros and cons of keeping Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in government, even though policymakers are ignoring that option. He thinks it might be the simplest and most effective choice - but it's the direct opposite of current policy trends.

A Booster Shot for Social Security (In These Times)

Sarah Jaffe explains the plan some progressive Democrats are presenting to expand Social Security. They call chained CPI a tax on life itself for seniors, because it assumes people will substitute cheaper goods when possible - but health care has no substitutes.

Ten States Have Banned Cities And Counties From Passing Paid Sick Days (ThinkProgress)

Bryce Covert looks at the states that passed preemptive laws banning municipalities from enacting paid sick leave. These states apparently know better than their cities, which may want to eliminate the lost productivity that comes with sick workers on the job.

Unemployment Benefits Set To Expire For 1.3 Million At End Of Year (HuffPo)

Arthur Delaney says that Congressional patterns of cutting close to the deadline for extending federal unemployment benefits should be cause for concern again this year. With Congress's disinterest in preventing SNAP cuts, he wonders if the same could happen here.

A Hunger Expert Explains What Happens Now That Food Stamps Are Cut (WaPo)

Dylan Matthews speaks to Joel Berg of the New York City Coalition Against Hunger about how SNAP cuts will affect food-insecure Americans, and how he would structure policy around hunger. Berg thinks that benefits weren't enough before the cuts.

New Student Loan Rules Add Protections for Borrowers (NYT)

Ann Carrns explains new rules from the Department of Education meant to helped borrowers get out of default. Income-based rehabilitative payments and increased ease in requesting forbearance should make a big difference for struggling graduates.

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Daily Digest - November 6: Underdog Cities and Underfunded Agencies

Nov 6, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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San Antonio's Simple Appeal to Millennials: Diversity, Decent Jobs, and Cheap Living (Atlantic Cities)

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San Antonio's Simple Appeal to Millennials: Diversity, Decent Jobs, and Cheap Living (Atlantic Cities)

Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz continues her series on cities "Where Millennials Can Make It Now." San Antonio, she says, is a bit of an underdog compared to other Texas cities that attract Millennials, but many residents relish that status.

  • Roosevelt Take: Nona speaks about how Millennials' views on love and relationships have been affected by the Great Recession in the newest video in the Roosevelt Institute's explainer series, "What's the Deal."

How Washington Is Wrecking the Future, in 2 Charts (The Atlantic)

Matthew O'Brien looks at the severe cuts to non-defense discretionary spending in the past few years with charts from the Financial Times. He argues that at these spending levels, government is only barely fulfilling its basic responsibilities.

Liberal Push to Expand Social Security Gains Steam (WaPo)

Greg Sargent speaks to Senator Sherrod Brown about why now is the time for Democrats to shift the conversation and go on the offensive for entitlement programs. The discussion should be about whether to make cuts to Social Security, not how much.

Shortchanging a Wall Street Watchdog (U.S. News & World Report)

Pat Garofalo argues that the Commodity Futures Trading Commission's budget is eternally short because of intentional Republican strategy. An underfunded enforcement agency can't enforce much of anything, let alone new Dodd-Frank regulations.

Will ENDA Be the Next Casualty of the GOP’s Internal Crisis? (The Nation)

Zoë Carpenter considers why the popularly supported Employment Non-Discrimination Act is unlikely to even get a vote in the House. Boehner claims it's to protect business owners - but business owners aren't speaking up against ENDA.

Higher Wage Is Approved in New Jersey (NYT)

Patrick McGeehan reports on the results of the NJ constitutional amendment, which not only raises the minimum wage starting on January 1, but also indexes it to inflation. That annual adjustment is key, because without it low-wage workers essentially get wage cuts each year.

Bulldozing Homes and Civil Rights (MSNBC)

Adam Serwer reports on the upcoming Supreme Court case Mount Holly Citizens in Action vs Township of Mount Holly, which he says could give the Court's right wing an opportunity to collapse the Fair Housing Act, a pillar of civil rights law.

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Daily Digest - November 5: Home Is Where The Affordable Rent Is

Nov 5, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Where Millennials Can Make It Now (Atlantic Cities)

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Where Millennials Can Make It Now (Atlantic Cities)

Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz introduces her two-week series on cities where Millennials afford the costs of achieving their goals. The first piece, on Omaha, points out the higher levels of risk Millennials can take on with low costs of living.

Median Wage Falls to Lowest Level Since 1998 (AJAM)

David Cay Johnston reports that as the median wage falls, average wages are rising, according to new data from the Social Security Administration. That's a sign of gains at the top of the income ladder, with the wealthiest Americans pulling up the average.

How Washington Abandoned America's Unpaid Interns (The Atlantic)

Stephen Lurie explains the legal puzzle that has left unpaid interns without protections. There's serious structural damage happening to the workplace when young people work unpaid and unprotected, but that can't be fixed without laws or regulations.

Where’s the GOP’s Anti-Poverty Agenda? (WaPo)

Ryan Cooper asks why the Republicans have ignored the section of their autopsy report about poverty. A hard line against poverty assistance programs is particularly horrifying when unemployment is still high, and the GOP knows it, but apparently doesn't care.

2014 Cuts Hit Defense Spending, so Obama Has Leverage on Taxes (MSNBC)

Timothy Noah suggests that since the next round of sequestration cuts hit the Pentagon, the Democrats have a lot more budget clout than they think. Republicans don't want to be tied to defense cuts, which makes these cuts a useful negotiation tool.

If the GOP Repeals Obamacare, 137 Million Americans Could Get Cancellation Notices (MoJo)

Erika Eichelberger thinks that the Republicans would face public outrage if they actually managed to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The people getting cancellation notices from their insurance companies today are big news, but a repeal would be exponentially larger.

Meet Preet Bharara, Who Just Won the Biggest Insider Trading Case Ever (WaPo)

Lydia DePillis profiles the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. His crusade against a culture of corruption on Wall Street led to a major victory in a criminal case against a hedge fund for insider trading yesterday.

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Daily Digest - November 4: You Can Keep It, Unless Your Insurance is No Good

Nov 4, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Aides Debated Obama Health-Care Coverage Promise (WSJ)

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Aides Debated Obama Health-Care Coverage Promise (WSJ)

Colleen McCain Nelson, Peter Nicholas, and Carol E. Lee speak to Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch about the President's assurance that people who liked their insurance would get to keep it. He says adding an asterisk for good insurance wasn't practical.

The Tea Party’s Assault on Workers (WaPo)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal writes that states controlled by the GOP aren't just taking action against public sector workers. Coordinated legislation across these states is harming private sector workers and limiting local labor protections, too.

Absolute 'credibility issue' for Obama (The Kudlow Report)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren appears on CNBC to discuss how the Healthcare.Gov rollout has harmed the Affordable Care Act and the President. He points out that 97% of Americans are unaffected by the website, which limits the potential damage.

Walmart Is Trying to Block Workers' Disability Benefits (MoJo)

Erika Eichelberger reports on a case before the Supreme Court which could make more difficult for all workers to obtain disability benefits. Walmart is trying to argue that appeals must occur within three years of filing a disability claim - regardless of how long that decision takes.

Burns Explores Roosevelt Legacy in New Documentary; Screening at Ga. Home of FDR (WaPo)

The Associated Press reports on an early screening of part of his new documentary on the Roosevelt family. Burns attempts to get beyond "treacly and superficial" stories to the real history and legacies of Theodore, Franklin, and Eleanor Roosevelt.

New on Next New Deal

The Origins of "If You Like Your Health Insurance, You Can Keep It"

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch explains why the President's leading message on health care was necessary. A more nuanced explanation would have allowed Republican fear-mongering to kill reform.

Federal Court Decision Doesn't Just Limit Abortion: It Creates a Crisis for Women's Health Care in Texas

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn writes on the Fifth Circuit decision that has shut down numerous women's health clinics across Texas. The state's new abortion laws aren't just limiting access to a legal medical procedure - they're limiting access to all health care.

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Daily Digest - November 1: Going Further Than Dodd-Frank

Nov 1, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Four Intriguing Ideas for How to Fix the Banks (Bloomberg Businessweek)

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Four Intriguing Ideas for How to Fix the Banks (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Peter Coy speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal about the upcoming report from the Roosevelt Institute and Americans for Financial Reform, "An Unfinished Mission: Making Wall Street Work for Us." He previews four of the papers from the report, including Mike's.

  • Roosevelt Institute Event: This report with be presented at a conference in Washington, DC on November 12, featuring a keynote from Senator Elizabeth Warren. For more information, click here.

Southwest Takes the Legal Battlefront on Abortion (Women's eNews)

Reshmi Kaur Oberoi looks at the current fights over abortion access in the southwestern United States. She references Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn's recent white paper on Title X in discussing access to reproductive care for Hispanic women in Texas.

  • Roosevelt Take: Andrea's white paper, "The Title X Factor: Why the Health of America's Women Depends on More Funding for Family Planning," argues that increasing funding for Title X will strengthen the Affordable Care Act, especially in the earlier phases of implementation.

How States Taken Over by the GOP in 2010 Have Been Quietly Screwing Over the American Worker (The Nation)

Zoë Carpenter looks at an Economic Policy Institute report on state-level attacks on labor. This coordinated campaign of cookie-cutter style legislation is hurting workers of all sorts - unionized and nonunionized, public and private.

Newt’s Revenge: Child Labor Makes a Comeback (Salon)

Josh Eidelson points out that the attack on labor has included rollbacks of child labor laws in four states. The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), which coordinates much of this legislation, apparently thinks attacking adult workers' rights isn't enough.

A War on the Poor (NYT)

Paul Krugman asks why the Republican party has shifted so far away from supporting programs that help the needy. He blames a combination of market ideology, an awareness of the changing racial dynamics of this country, and libertarian fantasy.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Jeff Madrick appeared on Countdown with Keith Olbermann to discuss this topic back in 2011.

War Brews on Spending Cuts (MSNBC)

Suzy Khimm reports on the coalition working to protect "non-defense" discretionary spending. The budget negotiations are primarily over this category of spending, which includes everything from mental health care to Census data collection to Head Start.

New on Next New Deal

Show Your Invisible Hand: Why the SEC Should Make Corporations Disclose Political Contributions

Roosevelt Institute Director of Research Susan Holmberg argues that requiring corporations to disclose their political contributions is good for investors and for the companies, which risk executives using political contributions for their own good.

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Daily Digest - October 31: Low Taxes Carry Heavy Burdens

Oct 31, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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The Great American Ripoff: The High Cost of Low Taxes (Bill Moyers)

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The Great American Ripoff: The High Cost of Low Taxes (Bill Moyers)

Joshua Holland argues that low taxes in the United States translate to hugely disproportionate out-of-pocket costs for things that would be covered by the social safety net in other countries. That also means there's nothing to catch people in crisis.

End Corporate Welfare for McDonald's. Better Yet, Raise the Minimum Wage (The Guardian)

Sadhbh Walshe looks at the latest story about McDonald's workers seeking public assistance, which revolves around a phone call to its McResource line. She argues that if McDonald's needs to refer their workers to Medicaid and SNAP, they should be paying better wages.

Another Temporary Funding Bill? (MSNBC)

Jane C. Timm reports that a grand bargain is pretty much out of the question, and at least one Senator thinks that a continuing resolution through the end of the fiscal year is likely. That would bring us to a month before the 2014 elections, which would be rough timing for a budget fight.

C.F.T.C. Approves Tighter Commodity Trading Rules (NYT)

Alexandra Stevenson reports on new rules from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, designed to protect client money from brokerage firms going bust. After a 2011 case that left customers $1.6 billion short, the need for these rules is pretty clear.

Paypal to Government: Be More Like Us (WaPo)

Lydia DePillis examines a report from Paypal that suggests how government should handle the mobile payment industry. The company calls on regulators to throw out their old methodology, which she thinks is hugely unlikely.

The New Futurism (The New Yorker)

James Surowiecki looks at human-capital contracts, which allow people to raise funds for businesses or education in exchange for a percentage of future earnings over a number of years. The principle is similar to income-based repayment on student loans.

New on Next New Deal

Maine's Lobster Industry is Dying, But Government Can Help Save It

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network student John Tranfaglia calls for government intervention in Maine's lobster industry. Instead of criticizing the Canadian government for subsidizing lobster processing, Governor LePage should figure out ways to attract lobster processors to Maine.

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Maine's Lobster Industry is Dying, But Government Can Help Save It

Oct 30, 2013John Tranfaglia

U.S. lobstermen aren't netting the profits they deserve thanks to trade arrangements with Canada.

U.S. lobstermen aren't netting the profits they deserve thanks to trade arrangements with Canada.

It is not very often that the New York Times decides to pen an article about the Maine lobster industry. So when a Canada correspondent based in Ottawa and a New England correspondent based in Boston write two different articles in a span of three days which both appear in the New York edition, it might be smart for Mainers to listen up. All evidence suggests that despite high demand for Maine lobster, the state’s defining industry will continue to die off without greater government support and investment.

Ian Austen, the Canada correspondent who authored the article “Hit by Low Prices, Lobstermen are at Odds in Maine and Canada” describes many of the uncomfortable truths surrounding the industry. The yearly haul of lobster continues to increase while lobstermen are receiving less for their catches. Every year Maine’s iconic business is reminded that the rising costs of fuel and bait and the stagnant or even decreasing price of lobster is unsustainable.

In looking at the issue of oversupply, Austen discusses the newly increased state lobster promotion fund. The fund, which saw its budget go from $400,000 to $2.4 million, is as contentious as it is necessary. In May, I wrote a piece for the Portland Press Herald describing why I believe the fund is essential to putting more money back in hands of the lobstermen. But the marketing funds may not be effective if the lobster is shipped to Canada for processing. Trade rules state that once this transaction has occurred, the lobster is considered a “product of Canada.” That doesn’t bode well for Maine, since 50-70 percent of the lobster caught off its coast (which amounted to 123.3 million pounds in 2012) will be sent to Canada.

Two days later, Jess Bidgood, who is based in Boston, authored “Some Wary as Lobstermen Unite.” The article addresses the division between the established Maine Lobstermen’s Association and the newly formed Maine Lobstermen’s Union. At issue is whether unionization is the right step for lobstermen to take in response to severely decreasing profits. As the article discusses, the 5,000 or so licensed lobstermen in the state operate as independent business owners, not the traditional laborers who historically have combined to join unions, and the the Maine Lobstermen’s Association has made it clear that it does not believe unionization is the right solution to the problem. But it is clear that there is a problem, and it isn't going away on its own.

The underlying issue behind both these articles is that the loss of profits for lobstermen is something that never should have happened. For years, Maine has been overly reliant on its Canadian neighbors to handle its processing needs, and for years we have seen price markups that have increased dealers’ profits while shrinking those of the lobstermen (why else would food trucks in D.C. be charging $18 or a lobster roll?). What might be most striking is that the lobster does indeed come from Maine and there is an overwhelming demand for it. The issue, and what I believe the state legislature should be focused on, is that lobstermen are being paid less than $2 a pound when they should be getting more.

Maine's Republican governor, Paul LePage, is quick to criticize Canada for subsidizing its processing plants. Here’s a wakeup call to the governor: that how governments and businesses interact. States provide tax breaks, subsidies, and other economic incentives to attract businesses. So instead of removing murals, fighting over the “state treat,” disagreeing over the presence of a television monitor in the state house, and all the other petty disputes the legislature and governor have had over the last few years, the state should pursue a progressive approach to supporting its core industry. And while the state is reforming its approach, the federal government should also take note of how industries can suffer when the parties bicker with one another instead of pursuing real solutions.

John Tranfaglia is a senior majoring in political science at American University and a member of the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network.

 

Man holding lobsters banner image via Shutterstock.com

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