Daily Digest - May 7: What's Good for Business Can Be Bad for Local Economies

May 7, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Surprise! 'Pro-Business' Policies Hurt State Economic Growth (LA Times)

A University of Wisconsin professor has shown that business-friendly ALEC's rankings of state economic policies are good predictors of slow job growth, writes Michael Hiltzik.

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Surprise! 'Pro-Business' Policies Hurt State Economic Growth (LA Times)

A University of Wisconsin professor has shown that business-friendly ALEC's rankings of state economic policies are good predictors of slow job growth, writes Michael Hiltzik.

A Year After Being Discredited, Austerity Economics Still Reigns (AJAM)

Dean Baker says that despite knowing that Carmen Reinhart and Ken Rogoff were wrong about debt-to-GDP ratios and economic growth, governments haven't given up on austerity.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal was one of the first to write about the problems in the infamous Reinhart-Rogoff paper.

Study: RomneyCare Seems To Have Saved Lives, And Obamacare Could Too (TPM)

A new study shows that Massachusetts' mortality rate fell after it implemented health care reform, reports Dylan Scott. The study's authors say the same could happen nationally.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch says that in addition to data like this, stories about the ACA's success are key to building support.

SEC Finds High Rate of Fee, Expense Violations at Private-Equity Firms (WSJ)

More than half of the firms allocated their expenses or charged fees inappropriately, or even illegally, to boost profits, report Gillian Tan and Michael Wursthorn.

There’s Still No Reason to be Afraid of the Inflation Monster (WaPo)

Matt O'Brien writes that despite persistent fears, wages aren't rising and therefore aren't causing inflation. The real story is that wages are flat despite lower unemployment.

What Would Happen to Companies Like Target If They Paid $15 an Hour? (PolicyShop)

David Callahan considers the possible impact of a modern-day Henry Ford giving low-wage workers a big increase. He says it would boost the entire economy and that company's profits.

New on Next New Deal

Turning Students' Vision Into Reality: Roosevelt's Campus Network at 10

As the nation's largest student policy organization approaches its 10th anniversary, alumna and former staffer Tarsi Dunlop reflects on what it has accomplished and what's to come.

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Daily Digest - May 6: Will the Robin Hood Tax Hit the Mark?

May 6, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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The Most Popular Tax in History Has Real Momentum (The Nation)

Katrina vanden Heuvel, a member of the Roosevelt Institute's Board of Directors, says that if Europe's "Robin Hood" tax is successfully implemented, it could boost efforts to implement a financial transactions tax in the U.S.

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The Most Popular Tax in History Has Real Momentum (The Nation)

Katrina vanden Heuvel, a member of the Roosevelt Institute's Board of Directors, says that if Europe's "Robin Hood" tax is successfully implemented, it could boost efforts to implement a financial transactions tax in the U.S.

Which States Are Givers and Which Are Takers? (The Atlantic)

Maps depicting states' reliance on federal funding lead John Tierney to ask whether the framework of givers and takers is useful, or whether we should instead focus on how the government creates an American community.

Blackstone Unit Invitation Homes Sued Over Rental House's Condition (LA Times)

Amid concerns about investment firms' ability to properly maintain the thousands of rental homes they've acquired, Andrew Khouri reports on one family's lawsuit over a slum-like house.

Gallup: Uninsured Rate Is Lowest We've Ever Recorded (TNR)

Jonathan Cohn reports on a new poll from Gallup, which has been asking whether people have health insurance since 2008. He warns that this isn't proof that more are getting health care, but it's a good start.

Millennials Have Stopped Trusting the Government (Vox)

Andrew Prokop breaks down a new survey by Harvard's Institute of Politics, which shows Millennials' decreasing trust in government over the past few years. Their biggest concern is unsurprising: the economy.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Vice President of Networks Taylor Jo Isenberg introduces the Campus Network's 2014 10 Ideas series, featuring top policy proposals from students across the country who still see ways for government to create a better world.

Nutter to Sign Minimum Wage Executive Order (Philadelphia Inquirer)

The Philadelphia mayor is following President Obama's lead, reports Claudia Vargas, by requiring a higher minimum wage in city contracts and subcontracts.

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Daily Digest - May 5: Yes, the Haves Still Have Most of It

May 5, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Is Net Neutrality Dead? (Bill Moyers)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford says FCC chairman Tom Wheeler is prioritizing political expediency over a real solution to the problem of net neutrality, such as declaring the Internet a utility.

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Is Net Neutrality Dead? (Bill Moyers)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford says FCC chairman Tom Wheeler is prioritizing political expediency over a real solution to the problem of net neutrality, such as declaring the Internet a utility.

Is Everyone a Little Bit Racist? (All In with Chris Hayes)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren discusses the ways that racial attitudes, which are different from racist behaviors, impact policy. 

Inequality Has Been Going On Forever ... but That Doesn’t Mean It’s Inevitable (NYT)

Inequality could be turned back, writes David Leonhardt and improving education might be an easier route than French economist Thomas Piketty's much-discussed suggestion of a global wealth tax.

Why the Jobs Report Isn’t All Good (The Nation)

George Zornick says that until the jobs report from the survey of households is just as positive as the one from the survey of businesses, Americans shouldn't be assured there's been economic growth.

Mary Jo White Doesn't Scare Anybody (TNR)

Alec MacGillis writes that while President Obama framed his choice for new chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission as a push back on Wall Street, in fact White's regulatory approach has been lacking.

New on Next New Deal

The Minimum Wage Index: Why the GOP's Filibuster Will Hurt Workers

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch lays out the numbers that show how raising the minimum wage is necessary for today's economy.

Cliven Bundy's Window into the War on the Poor

Cliven Bundy's description of the social safety net as a form of slavery reflects a common conservative ideology of poverty as personal failing, writes Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn. That framework enables the GOP's push to dismantle the safety net.

No More Sterlings: It's Time for Communities to Take Ownership of Their Sports Teams

Alan Smith, Roosevelt Institute's Associate Director of Networked Initiatives, writes that a fan-owned Los Angeles Clippers could be a model of how a sports team could truly support its community.as an anchor institution. 

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No More Sterlings: It's Time for Communities to Take Ownership of Their Sports Teams

May 2, 2014Alan Smith

Community-owned sports franchises can become institutions that truly reward the pride and devotion of their fans.

During game five of the Clippers-Warriors series earlier this week, basketball fans saw an impressive public outpouring of solidarity. The Clippers fans wore black, and stadium advertisements were covered in black as well. Fans chanted "We Are One" together during time outs. Countless signs read things like "this is our team" and "standing together against racism".

Community-owned sports franchises can become institutions that truly reward the pride and devotion of their fans.

During game five of the Clippers-Warriors series earlier this week, basketball fans saw an impressive public outpouring of solidarity. The Clippers fans wore black, and stadium advertisements were covered in black as well. Fans chanted "We Are One" together during time outs. Countless signs read things like "this is our team" and "standing together against racism".

There has been a Wikipedia's worth (can we make that a measurement now?) of public condemnation of Donald Sterling and his horrible statements about race. People have penned endless debates about what we should do, and how we should feel, in the wake of a racist old man being shamed and then sanctioned by the NBA.

But now, two Clippers fans have given us a logical and clear plan to make the solidarity and "our team" sentiments into something real and tangible: by crowdsourcing $600 million and buying the team. They've got a platform, they've started the journey, and they're getting some good press.

Before you laugh or roll your eyes, let's think this through together. As it happens, I've been talking about this exact problem for years: as a sports nerd and social justice advocate, I've been looking at the ownership model of professional sports with an eye to how the Baltimore Orioles could be purchased and converted to a non-profit serving the city of Baltimore. That's why I can tell you that this makes sense, and that it can work. Sports teams can be community anchors, driving local economic development and giving back to the communities that support them with everything from ticket sales and merchandise to time, passion, and love.

Recently I've written a lot about anchor institutions, which I define as places that, due to infrastructure or mission, can't get up and leave. Traditionally, anchor institutions are things like universities, hospitals, or community foundations. Right now, sports stadiums fit that definition, but sports teams don't. The Staples Center isn't going anywhere, but the Clippers could skip town as soon as their lease runs up. But why shouldn't we expect more from these teams, given that they are already so much a part of our cultural fabric? The constant competition between cities to woo teams like the Sacramento Kings or the Milwaukee Bucks reminds me of other race-to-the-bottom development strategies, in which cities bend over backwards to incentivize businesses to move, only to pay out more in benefits than they recoup in taxes.

We've been told again and again that sports teams provide huge financial benefits to their cities, but that's not usually born out in the bottom line. Professional sports owners have been holding cities hostage, demanding millions and millions of dollars in taxpayer money for new stadiums and new perks to keep their team where they are, and causing millions and millions of tears when they pick up a team like the Seattle Supersonics and move them to Oklahoma City. And jobs that are connected to a stadium or franchise are often low-wage positions, like working the hot dog stand. The potential mobility of franchises keeps them from truly serving as the anchor institutions they can and should be. 

Imagine instead what could happen when an entity like the Clippers changes its focus. If the team is anchored to the community that it serves, it can help support local vendors for the food it serves and the merchandise it sells. It can have an honest and open discussion about stadiums and ticket sales, and find better ways to get a larger swath of the city to support the team. The final step of the plan is to take all the “profits” from the organization and give them back to the community – to charity groups or the public education system depending on how the owners collectively vote. This would reflect pride in our homes and communities -- the reasons we all support a sports team to begin with! 

What's more, this crazy plan to root a team in its community is not unprecedented. The Green Bay Packers are owned by a community foundation, and they have more league championships than any other team in the NFL. Many European soccer teams, including perennial best-team-on-earth contender Barcelona, are owned by the fans.

I'm not suggesting that the community-owned Clippers would be softer, or expect handouts. They'll still be trying to win the title, and still doing it against 29 other teams that are trying to out-brand, out-compete, and out-pay their players. Chris Paul will still be the best point guard in the game, and want to be paid as such. They will still need to scout, game plan, and work the salary cap. But instead of doing that to benefit one person, why not do it to benefit the community that supports the team? 

Game seven is this weekend. For the Clippers, it's win or go home. A win, and they are still on track – and in a month they could not only be NBA champions, but also a team owned by the very people who will be dancing in the streets and celebrating their victory. And you don't need Donald Sterling money to be a part of that community -- with a just a small donation, you can channel all that outrage into making something positive happen.

Alan Smith is the Roosevelt Institute's Associate Director of Networked Initiatives.

Images via Thinkstock

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Good News for Progressive Economics: Big Thinkers Like Piketty Are Back in Vogue

May 2, 2014Felicia Wong

Thomas Piketty's success is no fluke; he and other progressive thinkers have redefined the public debate around inequality.

Thomas Piketty's success is no fluke; he and other progressive thinkers have redefined the public debate around inequality.

Inequality suddenly is the topic of the moment. Last weekend the French economist Thomas Piketty – whose recently published Capital in the 21st Century is now #1 on the Amazon best seller list, shocking for a 690-page macroeconomic tome – was not only the subject of dueling Paul Krugman/David Brooks op-ed columns in the New York Times. Piketty was also top of the fold in the Times’ Sunday Styles section (headline: “Hey, Big Thinker”), which made note of his “boyishly handsome” looks. Clearly, something is up.

At Boston Review, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal provides an excellent overview of the response to Piketty from both left and right. (You can also listen to him discuss it with WNYC’s Brian Lehrer.) Much of the commentary seems to have gone, in only two or three weeks, from economic and policy questions (about his core formula, r>g, or about whether his recommendation of a global tax on capital is actually realistic) to observations that he is a “sign of his times.” In my view, this observation is absolutely right. Piketty’s argument about increasing returns to capital, relatively weak returns to labor, sluggish growth, and the overall rise of both income inequality and wealth inequality, is in fact perfectly in tune with our political and economic concerns today. 

However, I would go much farther than to say that Piketty is merely a sign of his times. I would say that he and other economists have actually defined these times — or at least helped create today’s environment. Piketty and his colleague Emmanuel Saez have been developing their top incomes database for the last 15 years, and publishing results along the way. Since 2003, Piketty’s data, based on an exhaustive review of tax records, has been setting the agenda and driving a tremendous amount of research. I first encountered the data in Winner-Take-All Politicsalso a best-seller, by political scientists Jacob Hacker and Paul Pierson. 

Moreover, a number of those involved credit Piketty’s data with sparking the fall 2011 rise of Occupy Wall Street and the 99 percent framing, which remains a central part of our national conversation. (Credit, according to many others, also goes to Roosevelt Institute’s Chief Economist Joe Stiglitz and his widely read April 2011 Vanity Fair piece, “Of the 1%, By the 1%, For the 1%.” )

My point is this: Big Thinkers, whether Thomas Piketty or Joe Stiglitz or others, are not just reflections of the times. They are creating today’s debate. Ideas really matter.

In congressional testimony on inequality Stiglitz gave three weeks ago, he noticed a real change in attitude among senators, who are open to everything from a carbon tax to changes in corporate taxation, carried income, and the like. 

We are at a unique moment, thanks to Piketty, Stiglitz, the Occupy Wall Street organizers, and many others. Think tanks like Roosevelt Institute’s Four Freedoms Center have a window within which these ideas and arguments can make a very big difference – in the media, in Congress, and, I hope, in cities and towns nationwide. We are pushing hard here to create to a new normal in our understanding of the political economy. Our argument: you can increase economic growth and decrease inequality simultaneously. 

But forces are also arraying against us. The conservatives have yet to fully organize their arguments against Piketty, but already the American Enterprise Institute is arguing that he is promoting the end of capitalism. (He isn’t.) Moreover, I am hearing from Washington sources that over the next year, and especially leading into the midterms, destroying any burgeoning inequality agenda is a central goal of the right wing.

If we want a new normal in our understanding of inequality, we need to be ready to go on the offensive – strategically and systematically. We have solutions. Recent evidence shows they can work. Now: can we put muscle behind the ideas?

Felicia Wong is President and CEO of the Roosevelt Institute. Follow her on Twitter at @FeliciaWongRI.

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Daily Digest - May 2: What Piketty Tells Us About the Power of Big Thinkers

May 2, 2014Tim Price

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We Read Seven Thomas Piketty Think-Pieces For You (The Brian Lehrer Show)

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We Read Seven Thomas Piketty Think-Pieces For You (The Brian Lehrer Show)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal joins Brian Lehrer to explore some notable responses to Capital in the 21st Century, from the Financial Times to Esquire to Mike's own piece in the Boston Review.

Poll: Americans feel system is 'stacked against' them (Now with Alex Wagner)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren talks to Alex Wagner and Heather McGhee about the fight for a living wage, and notes that progressives are succeeding at the local level even when the federal government is unresponsive.

The Tech Deficit & Living in Afghanistan (The Weekly Wonk Podcast)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford, Fuzz Hogan, and Dan Tangherlini discuss the lack of tech expertise in the public sector and how to build a culture that makes government work more appealing. The segment begins at 12:24.

Seattle Mayor Says He Struck a Deal for a $15 Minimum Wage (WaPo)

The deal requires large businesses in the city to raise the minimum wage in three years, reports Niraj Chokshi, but allows small businesses seven years to comply. The City Council will take up the bill next week.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute President and CEO Felicia Wong delivered the closing remarks at the mayor's recent symposium, where she said calls for a higher minimum wage were calls for democracy.

Why Economics Failed (NYT)

During the Great Recession and its aftermath, writes Paul Krugman, leaders ignored the textbook macroeconomics that could have restored full employment and prevented so much suffering.

Can We Have More Jobs and Less Work? (In These Times)

Jessica Stites speaks to progressive thinkers who call for seemingly opposite approaches to making life better for waged workers in today's economy: full employment, and less work with a universal basic income.

Why Poverty Is Still Miserable, Even if Everybody Can Own an Awesome Television (Slate)

Consumer goods like TVs and cell phones are cheaper than ever, writes Jordan Weissmann, but for low-income families, essentials like health care and education are getting further and further out of reach.

New on Next New Deal

Good News for Progressive Economics: Big Thinkers Like Piketty Are Back in Vogue

Roosevelt Institute President and CEO Felicia Wong writes that Thomas Piketty's success is no fluke. He and other progressive thinkers have redefined the debate around inequality with the power of their ideas.

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Daily Digest - May 1: Why Won't Washington Listen to Workers?

May 1, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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America's Workforce Radio (WERE 1490 AM)

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch joins Ed Ferenc to discuss how organized labor has used its power to ensure a fair deal for the middle class. Richard's segment begins at 15:55.

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America's Workforce Radio (WERE 1490 AM)

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch joins Ed Ferenc to discuss how organized labor has used its power to ensure a fair deal for the middle class. Richard's segment begins at 15:55.

Republican-Led Filibuster Blocks Minimum Wage Bill in Senate (NYT)

Jeremy W. Peters reports on yesterday's filibuster, which killed the proposed $10.10 minimum wage increase. Republicans claim they're protecting a weak economy, but Democrats say the problem is poverty wages.

Why the Minimum Wage Vote Failed Today (PolicyShop)

Heather McGee ties the minimum wage filibuster to campaign finance. The wealthiest Americans have a very different opinion on the minimum wage than others, and they're who Congress hears from most.

Why Economic Growth Ground to a Halt Last Quarter (Vox)

The harsh winter was probably a cause of the slowest economic growth since the fourth quarter of 2012, says Danielle Kurtzleben, but this early estimate of GDP is still subject to revision.

Fed to Scale Back Bond Purchases by Another $10 Billion (WaPo)

Ylan Q. Mui reports that despite the news about slow economic growth, the Federal Reserve continues to demonstrate confidence in the recovery by tapering its stimulus program.

Paul Ryan Won’t Let Poor People Testify At Hearing About Poverty (ThinkProgress)

Yesterday's hearing wasn't the first time that advocacy groups were turned away from testifying at one of Ryan's hearings, reports Bryce Covert. Experts may study poverty, but they usually aren't experiencing it themselves.

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Daily Digest - April 30: Piketty Puts the Rich Under the Microscope

Apr 30, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Studying the Rich (Boston Review)

In his review of Thomas Piketty's Capital in the 21st Century, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal says the wealthy worry about their place in society because they're no longer just a model of success: they're a research question to study.

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Studying the Rich (Boston Review)

In his review of Thomas Piketty's Capital in the 21st Century, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal says the wealthy worry about their place in society because they're no longer just a model of success: they're a research question to study.

Fight Over Minimum Wage Hike Comes to a Head in the Senate (CBS News)

Rebecca Kaplan reports that after months of delays, a bill to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour will finally reach the Senate today. If the GOP filibusters as expected, the bill will be short-lived.

Stop Worrying and Enjoy Rising Wages (NYT)

Jared Bernstein calls on the Fed to allow wages to rise without worrying too much about inflation. There's no real evidence that inflation is rising too fast, but there are plenty of reasons to celebrate wage growth.

Why Americans Are Moving Less: New Jobs Aren't Worth It (Atlantic Cities)

The financial benefits of changing jobs have diminished, according to one new study, and Richard Florida reports that this could be the key to understanding the decline in interstate moves.

Sorry Conservatives — America’s Mobility Problem is Real (MSNBC)

Timothy Noah counters the typical conservative claims that social mobility is strong in the U.S. He points out that intergenerational shifts provide far more useful data than individuals' lifetime earnings.

New on Next New Deal

Post Office Piles on Shift to Low Wage Economy with Staples Deal

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch says that the expansion of mini-post offices in Staples is indicative of the U.S. economy's overall shift toward low-wage jobs since the Great Recession.

Doesn't All Work Deserve Dignity?

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Operations Strategist Lydia Bowers uses a subway ad about food delivery as a reminder of President Roosevelt's call for a living wage and leisure time for all workers.

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Post Office Piles on Shift to Low Wage Economy with Staples Deal

Apr 29, 2014Richard Kirsch

The U.S. Postal Service is making changes that will add low wage jobs to our economy, rather than the middle-class jobs it's known for that we really need.

The U.S. Postal Service is making changes that will add low wage jobs to our economy, rather than the middle-class jobs it's known for that we really need.

The National Employment Law Project (NELP) has just come out with its latest report on the wage-levels of jobs added as the nation has emerged from the Great Recession. As with NELP’s previous reports, which continue to garner national attention, the news was pretty simple: we’re only adding low wage jobs. Some 1.85 million more low-wage workers – defined by under $13.33 an hour – are employed by low-wage industries now then in 2008.  About the same number, 1.93 million workers – fewer workers are now employed in mid-wage and higher-wage industries. 

The U.S. Postal Service has historically been one of those higher-wage industries, with average pay just under $25 an hour. For generations, postal jobs have been a ticket to the middle-class, including as one of the few employers who hired African-Americans at good wages earlier in the 20th Century.  But the post office is accelerating a new strategy to increase sales and shed labor costs by opening up mini-post offices at Staples stores.

Staples is one of those low-wage employers, with Staples workers reporting that retail clerks average around $8.50 an hour. After piloting the mini-post offices in 82 Staples stores, the post office announced it would expand the program, prompting the American Postal Workers Union to organize more than 50 protest rallies outside Staples stores around the country.

Of course, Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said that no postal jobs would be lost because of the Staples program and that the motivation was “growing our business.” But the same Wall Street Journal article with Donohoe’s statement revealed the real motivation. It quoted an internal postal service memo, which said that the Staples pilot program was to determine “if lower costs can be realized with retail partner labor instead of the labor traditionally associated with retail window at Post Offices.” Oops!

The Staples arrangement is a huge expansion of the arrangement with retailers like WalMart and CVS around the country to sell stamps and other limited services. If the Staples pilot takes hold, it could pave the way for a huge collapse in the number of post offices outside rural areas. 

It’s good to see that the American Postal Workers Union is loudly protesting the Staples deal. Workers in 27 states carried signs saying “Stop Staples: The U.S. Mail is Not for Sale” at the protests held on Thursday. The postal union is looking for allies. The California Federation of Teachers, which has 120,000 members, is considering a resolution to boycott buying school supplies at Staples.

What’s at stake is not just the jobs of postal workers; it’s the American economy. We built the economy with middle-class jobs and the more we destroy them, the bleaker the prospects of economic prosperity for all but the richest of us.

I’ll be looking for a new source of office supplies too.

Richard Kirsch is a Senior Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, a Senior Adviser to USAction, and the author of Fighting for Our Health. He was National Campaign Manager of Health Care for America Now during the legislative battle to pass reform.

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Daily Digest - April 29: Paul Ryan's Anti-Poverty Theater

Apr 29, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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The New Paul Ryan Is All About Heart (NY Mag)

Though Paul Ryan tries to portray himself as the Republican who cares about the poor, his policies cut funding from anti-poverty programs, writes Jonathan Chait.

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The New Paul Ryan Is All About Heart (NY Mag)

Though Paul Ryan tries to portray himself as the Republican who cares about the poor, his policies cut funding from anti-poverty programs, writes Jonathan Chait.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal points out that Ryan doesn't just cut funding from the poor; he buys into the fantasy that charity alone could solve poverty.

Trucking Used to Be a Ticket to the Middle Class. Now It’s Just Another Low-Wage Job. (WaPo)

Lydia DePillis explains how the (potentially illegal) reclassification of truck drivers as independent contractors has changed the industry. With all the costs shifting onto the drivers, earnings have dropped.

Hawaii Set to Become Third State to Hike Minimum Wage to $10.10 (MSNBC)

Hawaii will follow in the footsteps of Connecticut and Maryland, reports Ned Resnikoff. The state is also giving a big boost to its tipped workers, whose wages will be calculated by far more favorable rules.

The Adjunct Revolt: How Poor Professors Are Fighting Back (The Atlantic)

Elizabeth Segran looks at adjunct professor organizing, which has grown tremendously. It's not just about money; adjuncts complain that it is impossible for them to properly teach under this system.

The Real Reason Conservatives Oppose Renewing Unemployment Insurance (TNR)

Conservatives are asking for overwhelming proof that the long-term unemployed suffer without extended unemployment insurance, says Danny Vinik, because they just don't want to spend the money.

Get Rid of Job Killing Tax Extenders; Pay For the Rest (Working Economics)

Thomas L. Hungerford points out House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp's hypocrisy: he requires budget offsets for unemployment insurance, but not for more expensive tax breaks.

What Problem Is Privatizing Fannie and Freddie Meant to Solve? (HuffPo)

Dean Baker sees no reason to privatize Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac right now, since they are performing well. But if we must, government should get out of mortgage-backed securities entirely.

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