Daily Digest - August 15: Social Security at 79

Aug 15, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Social Security Marks 79th Birthday with Declining Service (WaPo)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Social Security Marks 79th Birthday with Declining Service (WaPo)

Joe Davidson says that the Social Security Administration continues to aim for providing "the best possible service for the American public," but budget and staffing cuts have hampered that goal.

  • Roosevelt Take: Campus Network member Brian Lamberta calls for eliminating the cap on Social Security taxes to ensure the program's sustainability through Millennials' retirements and beyond.

Starbucks to Revise Policies to End Irregular Schedules for Its 130,000 Baristas (NYT)

In response to an article in The New York Times about a single mother's struggle with erratic scheduling, Starbucks plans to revise its scheduling practices to improve worker stability, writes Jodi Kantor.

Why the Minimum Wage Issue is a Win-Win for Obama (MSNBC)

Timothy Noah explains that if Congress won't pass a minimum wage increase, then Democrats have an easy wedge issue for the 2014 elections, which is especially important as they fight to hold the Senate.

Education Alone Is Not the Answer to Income Inequality and Slow Recovery (TAP)

Many economists are emphasizing education as a way to spread the economic recovery beyond the 1 percent, but Robert Kuttner argues for a job-creating solution instead: infrastructure investment.

It's Time to Pay Prisoners the Minimum Wage (TNR)

Josh Kovensky argues that using prison labor as a cost-cutting measure is ineffective and creates unexpected costs, particularly relating to the dependents of prisoners.

When Your Employer Doesn’t Consider You an Employee (AJAM)

The recently proposed Payroll Fraud Prevention Act would help balance power in the workplace by ensuring workers know their rights as employees or contractors, writes Malcolm Harris.

Why it’s No Easy Task to Determine What the GSEs Should Charge for Their Guarantee (MetroTrends Blog)

Laurie Goodman, Ellen Seidman, Jim Parrott, and Jun Zhu lay out the difficulties in determining what fees Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac should charge for guaranteeing mortgage-backed securities.

Share This

Daily Digest - August 14: As Maine Goes, So Goes the Internet

Aug 14, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Racial Discrimination Alive and Well in Reproductive Healthcare (The Hill)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Racial Discrimination Alive and Well in Reproductive Healthcare (The Hill)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn looks at racial disparities in access to health care in the U.S. in light of the U.N.'s periodic review of countries' work to dismantle racism.

How Maine Saved the Internet (Bloomberg View)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford explains how a town in Maine with a population of only 3,321 got a reasonably priced, high-speed fiber optic network.

What’s Lost in the Market Basket Stories (Working Economics)

Workers should not have to rely on a benevolent CEO to ensure they have "good" jobs, writes David Cooper. Better labor laws would make sure everyone had those benefits.

Why Is it So Controversial to Help Poor Mothers Afford Diapers? (The Nation)

Bryce Covert calls out those who see diaper subsidy programs as "controversial," because these programs help children and working families to thrive. They should be a no-brainer, she says.

Working Anything but 9 to 5 (NYT)

Jodi Kantor looks at one mother's struggle with automated scheduling software that threw her and her child's lives into chaos, as she worked unpredictable and sometimes unreasonable hours.

Virgin America Flight Attendants Vote To Join Union (HuffPo)

One worker who voted against unionization in 2011 explained that since the last vote, grievances continued unaddressed, leading to yesterday's decisive win, reports Dave Jamieson.

Silicon Valley Is Ruining "Sharing" for Everybody (TNR)

Noam Scheiber decries the Silicon Valley definition of "sharing," which is more along the lines of under-regulated economic activity that takes advantage of users' skills, possessions, or property.

Share This

Daily Digest - August 13: Working Without a Net in the Gig Economy

Aug 13, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

America's Social Safety Net is Failing Workers in the 'Gig Economy' (The Week)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

America's Social Safety Net is Failing Workers in the 'Gig Economy' (The Week)

Particularly in today's economy of short-term gigs, contract work, and other forms of precarious employment, Sarah Jaffe says the current system of unemployment benefits isn't cutting it.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Operations Director Lydia Bowers looks at some of the other labor protections missing in the gig economy.

By Any Measure, The Job Market Is Getting Better (FiveThirtyEight)

No matter how he counts the unemployed, Ben Casselman finds the same pattern: the ratio of job-seekers to available jobs has dropped significantly, almost to pre-recession levels.

Graphic: Unpaid Interns Have Few Legal Rights (Bloomberg Businessweek)

In this flowchart, Josh Eidelson lays out the scant legal protections afforded interns throughout the country, with details about relevant court cases and state-by-state variations.

Yellen Resolved to Avoid Raising Rates Too Soon, Fearing Downturn (Reuters)

Howard Schneider and Jonathan Spicer report that Federal Reserve insiders say Janet Yellen is showing extreme caution on raising interest rates, because inflation is easier to fight than recessions.

Another Argument Against the Medicaid Expansion Just Got Weaker (WaPo)

Jason Millman looks at the history of Medicaid funding, and finds that states don't really have to worry about the federal government backing out of its share of expansion funding.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn ties refusal to expand Medicaid to the U.S.'s high and increasing maternal mortality rate.

The Jobs Added In Today’s Economy Pay A Quarter Less Than The Ones We Lost In The Recession (ThinkProgress)

Bryce Covert looks at a new report from the U.S. Council of Mayors, which shows that the jobs added since the recession pay less largely due to the sectors in which jobs were lost and regained.

Labor and Small Businesses Team up on California Franchising Law (MSNBC)

The proposed law would make it harder to terminate franchise agreements. Ned Resnikoff says labor groups hope franchisees will treat workers better with less franchisor influence and interference.

New on Next New Deal

The Inconvenient Truth About Ineqality

In his video speculation for the Next American Economy project, Lenny Mendonca says a "vested set of interests" will keep the issues raised in Piketty's Capital out of real policy debates.

Share This

Daily Digest - August 12: What Happens When the Workers Become the Owners?

Aug 12, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Is Worker Ownership a Way Forward for Market Basket? (Truthout)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Is Worker Ownership a Way Forward for Market Basket? (Truthout)

Gar Alperovitz says the current protests at Market Basket are a sign of the desire for community and worker-friendly businesses, which he suggests are easier to achieve with employee ownership.

Surprise! North Carolina Cuts to Jobless Benefits Did Not Help Workers (TAP)

Valerie Wilson lays out the data, which shows that cutting the duration and amount of unemployment benefits did not magically improve the job market in North Carolina.

New York Prosecutors Charge Payday Lenders With Usury (NYT)

State prosecutors charged a group of lenders incorporated across the country with shared (and obscured) ownership of charging illegal interest rates to New Yorkers, reports Jessica Silver-Greenberg.

Give the President (and Yourself) a Break (U.S. News & World Report)

Instead of griping about the President's vacation, lawmakers should work to ensure that all Americans get paid vacation time and are able to use it, writes Pat Garofalo.

Unions Team Up With Fast-Food Owners (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Patrick Clark looks at the uneasy alliance between fast food franchisees and labor unions as they push for fairer franchising laws in California, which unions hope would translate into better working conditions.

It Matters How Rich the Rich Are (Policy Shop)

Matt Bruenig says that we must know how rich the rich are in order to fight poverty, since the distribution of wealth creates poverty. He also asks how we would know if policy is working without that data.

How Student Debt Crushes Your Chances of Buying a Home (WaPo)

Dina ElBoghdady looks at a new study that lays out the complex ways student debt interacts with homeownership, including a close look at total amount of debt and size of payments.

Share This

Daily Digest - August 11: Big Business's Frenemy in the White House

Aug 11, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Your Call: The U.S.-Africa Summit and Corporate Taxes (KALW)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Your Call: The U.S.-Africa Summit and Corporate Taxes (KALW)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal discusses President Obama's interview with The Economist, and explains the administration's relationship with big business. His segment begins at 34:00.

Libertarian Fantasies (NYT)

Paul Krugman says that the libertarian vision of society bears little resemblance to reality, and references Mike Konczal's recent piece on libertarians and basic guaranteed income as an example.

Paul Ryan's Magical Poverty Tour (AJAM)

Susan Greenbaum points to an existing welfare block grant – the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program – as proof that Ryan's plan would not serve enough of the eligible families.

Franchise Association Sues Over Seattle’s $15 Wage (MSNBC)

The law requires large businesses, including franchisees, to raise wages faster than smaller ones. Franchisees claims this discriminates against their business model, reports Ned Resnikoff.

Decline in 'Slack' Helps Fed Gauge Recovery (WSJ)

Pedro da Costa explains how the gap between economic resources we have and those that we use, particularly in the labor market, is influencing Federal Reserve decisions about interest rates.

Fed's Fischer Calls U.S. and Global Recoveries Disappointing (Reuters)

Howard Schneider reports on Federal Reserve Vice Chair Stanley Fischer's concerns regarding how central banks must respond to the possibility of permanently slowed growth post-recession.

‘Eat Your Vegetables’ Is Easier for Low-Income Mothers Who Get Help (Pacific Standard)

A new study shows financial incentives at farmers' markets do work to increase vegetable consumption, writes Avital Andrews, which makes a strong case for government nutrition incentives.

Share This

Daily Digest - August 8: The Man with the Misguided Anti-Poverty Plan

Aug 8, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Paul Ryan’s Magical Thinking (The Baffler)

Paul Ryan's belief that poverty is rooted in personal failure isn't the only problem with his anti-poverty plan, writes Ned Resnikoff. It's also impractical to implement and too easily abused.

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Paul Ryan’s Magical Thinking (The Baffler)

Paul Ryan's belief that poverty is rooted in personal failure isn't the only problem with his anti-poverty plan, writes Ned Resnikoff. It's also impractical to implement and too easily abused.

An Interview With the President (The Economist)

While discussing corporate responsibility in this wide-ranging interview, President Obama points out that companies profess to care about social issues, but only lobby for their tax breaks.

Let's Do It! Let's Bring Back Earmarks! (HuffPo)

Ending earmarks has done nothing to reduce American cynicism about government's motives, and has contributed to congressional gridlock, writes Jason Linkins.

When U.S. Companies Skip the Country to Dodge Taxes, Their Shareholders Can Foot the Bill (Quartz)

Since shareholders are hit with a capital gains tax bill when companies use inversion (merging with a foreign company) to avoid taxes, Tim Fernholz says raising those rates could slow the problem.

These 7 Charts Show Why the Rent Is Too Damn High (MoJo)

Erika Eichelberger and AJ Vicens lay out the data explaining shifts in rental housing. They say that reducing government's role in housing finance could direct funds toward affordable rental housing.

New on Next New Deal

Without Public Investment, the U.S. Will Fall Into Chaos

In her video speculation for the Next American Economy project, Sarah Burd-Sharps, Co-Director of Measure for America, predicts that fiscal moderates will push public investment out of fear of a more costly future.

The Pragmatic Libertarian Case for a Basic Income Doesn't Add Up

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal says that Matt Zwolinski's case for a basic income guarantee makes faulty assumptions about what government is already providing through welfare.

Share This

Sarah Burd-Sharps: Without Public Investment, the U.S. Will Fall Into Chaos

Aug 8, 2014

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Measure of America's Sarah Burd-Sharps looks at the sweeping consequences of the government's failure to invest in the future.

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Measure of America's Sarah Burd-Sharps looks at the sweeping consequences of the government's failure to invest in the future.

Sarah Burd-Sharps, Co-Director of Measure of America, speculates on the consequences of declining public investment in infrastructure, regulation, education, and more. With government abdicating its basic responsibilities, the U.S. will face increasing chaos -- collapsing bridges, food contamination outbreaks, falling elevators, and unemployed teenagers. Burd-Sharps imagines a moderate political wing moved to act by the rising economic costs of under-investment.

Share This

Daily Digest - August 7: What Piketty's 'Capital' Means for Marginalized Americans

Aug 7, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

How Gender Changes Piketty’s ‘Capital in the Twenty-First Century’ (The Nation)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

How Gender Changes Piketty’s ‘Capital in the Twenty-First Century’ (The Nation)

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Director Joelle Gamble joins The Nation's roundtable on feminism and the economy to discuss how Piketty's findings affect women and people of color.

New York: Young Ideas for Social Cohesion (UBM's Future Cities)

Jordan Fraade writes about the Roosevelt Institute Summer Academy's NYC Policy Expo as an example of young people not just moving to cities, but developing policy to improve them.

The 1% May Be Richer Than You Think, Research Shows (Bloomberg)

Jeanna Smialek reports on new research that shows the wealth of the 1 percent to be significantly undercounted. She speaks to Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz, who isn't surprised.

Bank of America Offers U.S. Biggest Settlement in History (NYT)

In reaction to another case that turned out badly, Bank of America has offered a $16 billion settlement for its sale of toxic mortgage securities, write Ben Protess and Michael Corkery.

Cold Porridge For Regular People: The Myth of the Goldilocks Economy (TAP)

Robert Kuttner says that only the wealthy could consider this economic climate not too hot or too cold – for everyone else, there aren't enough jobs and wages are staying flat.

The Market Basket Protests And The American Worker (On Point)

Tom Ashbrook takes a close look at the protests happening at Market Basket supermarkets, in which the managers are pushing to keep a CEO who they feel has workers' best interests at heart.

New on Next New Deal

Progress, Yet No Progress: The Two Lines of Defense Against Too-Big-To-Fail

The largest banks' "living wills," meant to facilitate an orderly bankruptcy process, aren't good enough, and Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal says that shows that Too-Big-to-Fail isn't entirely solved.

As Tech Advances, Big Business Will Reap the Benefits

In his video speculation for the Next American Economy project, Robert Litan of the Brookings Institution says that existing businesses are capturing the benefits of new technology, to the detriment of new firms.

Share This

Robert Litan: As Tech Advances, Big Business Will Reap the Benefits

Aug 7, 2014

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Brookings' Robert Litan presents the evidence that incumbent firms will consume an increasingly large piece of the economic pie.

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Brookings' Robert Litan presents the evidence that incumbent firms will consume an increasingly large piece of the economic pie.

Robert Litan, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, speculates that the benefits from new technology could be captured by incumbent firms in the short term, to the detriment of business dynamism. Supporting that speculation, he observes two present-day business trends: first, a rising share of national income is going to big incumbent firms; second, firms older than 15 years (incumbents) comprise an increasingly large share of businesses overall. In short, evidence suggests older firms are increasingly dominant in the economy.  

Share This

Dane Stangler: Changing Demographics and Funding Strategies Will Expand Entrepreneurship

Aug 6, 2014

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Dane Stangler of the Kauffman Foundation predicts that the entrepreneur class will become more diverse as a younger population makes use of new funding platforms.

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, Dane Stangler of the Kauffman Foundation predicts that the entrepreneur class will become more diverse as a younger population makes use of new funding platforms.

By 2040, demographic trends will drive a flourishing of new kinds of entrepreneurial activities, speculated Dane Stangler, Vice President of Research and Policy at the Kauffman Foundation. We will see a bulge in the 20-40 age demographic -- the key entrepreneurial age. But most importantly, new platforms -- like crowd-funding and re-localized production -- will allow for the diversification of entrepreneurship. For the first time, this will allow Americans from a wide range of backgrounds to build new businesses.  

Share This

Pages