Daily Digest - October 29: We Need Better Internet Access to Reduce Inequality

Oct 29, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Digital Divide Exacerbates U.S. Inequality (Financial Times)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Digital Divide Exacerbates U.S. Inequality (Financial Times)

David Crow quotes Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford on how the digital divide contributes to inequality in light of new data on broadband access throughout the country.

High-income Households Pay a Large Share of US Taxes—But This Doesn’t Make Our Tax System Progressive (Working Economics)

Joshua Smith draws on a recent blog post by Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal to consider what we call a progressive tax system, and whether it lives up to its billing.

Lobbyists, Bearing Gifts, Pursue Attorneys General (NYT)

Eric Lipton investigates corporations' extensive lobbying of attorneys general throughout the country. In many cases, the lobbyists represent corporations under investigation.

Fed Set to End QE3, But Not the QE Concept (WSJ)

Pedro da Costa says that the Federal Reserve is almost certain to end the current bond-buying program, but this last resort option will remain in the policy tool kit.

Students Pressure Harvard Over Safety at a University-Owned Hotel (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Student protests at Harvard support workers' attempts to unionize, reports Natalie Kitroeff. The hotel reported 75 percent more on-the-job injuries than the statewide average last year.

New on Next New Deal

It's Essential the Federal Reserve Discusses Inequality

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal responds to right-wing critics who say Janet Yellen shouldn't talk about inequality, offering five reasons why it's actually integral to the monetary policy debate.

California Community Colleges Building the Workforce of Tomorrow

Rachel Kanakaole, head of the San Bernadino Valley Community College chapter of the Campus Network, examines a new program offering career-focused bachelor's degrees at campuses like hers.

Share This

Daily Digest - October 9: Extreme Wealth Disparities Will Lead to Social Dysfunction

Oct 9, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Top 400 U.S. Billionaires' Wealth Equals Brazil's GDP (Real News Network)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Top 400 U.S. Billionaires' Wealth Equals Brazil's GDP (Real News Network)

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Rob Johnson comments on this data point from Forbes, noting that the social dysfunction caused by this kind of inequality isn't hitting the wealthy yet.

Pulling the Plug on Comcast's Merger (Bloomberg View)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford explains why the Federal Communications Commission should block Comcast's proposed merger with Time Warner Cable.

Debt Scolds: Pay No Attention to the Falling Deficit! (NY Mag)

Jonathan Chait scolds those who treated the deficit like the end of the world; now, the deficit is falling, but their outlook took needed stimulus off the table back in 2009.

Fed Officials to Be Flexible on How They Raise Rates (WSJ)

Reporting on the Federal Reserve meeting notes from September, Jon Hilsenrath explains the Fed's decision to try new experimental tools when it's time to raise interest rates.

Obama Had Security Fears on JPMorgan Data Breach (NYT)

Michael Corkery, Jessica Silver-Greenberg, and David E. Sanger report on the administration's knowledge of a summer-long cyberattack on JPMorgan and other banks.

Post-recession Decline in Black Women’s Wages is Consistent with Occupational Downgrading (Working Economics)

Valerie Wilson says that unlike other groups, black women lost both mid-wage and high-wage jobs in the recession, which explains their decreased earnings.

New on Next New Deal

Obama Administration Defends Amazon’s Low Pay – Again

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch says the support of Amazon in Integrity Staffing Solutions v. Busk illustrates the continued influence of the donor class over workers.

The Federal Reserve Won't Save the Economy for All

Deepening participatory democracy will improve outcomes for the working class, writes Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Director Joelle Gamble.

Share This

Daily Digest - October 8: Government Should Push Back on Bad Financial Deals

Oct 8, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

City Hall’s Inaction on Interest-Rate Swaps Is Indefensible (Chicago Sun-Times)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

City Hall’s Inaction on Interest-Rate Swaps Is Indefensible (Chicago Sun-Times)

In a letter to the editor, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Saqib Bhatti points out what the Sun-Times missed in defending Mayor Emanuel's inaction to recover funds from these toxic deals.

Changing the Future of Sexual and Reproductive Rights (HuffPo)

In light of the Women and Girls Rising conference, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn and Campus Network Lower Northeast Policy Coordinator Ariel Smilowitz examine the policy shifts needed in the U.S.

Eric Schneiderman is Still Seeking Justice for the Financial Crisis (WaPo)

Katrina vanden Heuvel, a member of the Roosevelt Institute's Board of Directors, praises New York's Attorney General for almost single-handedly keeping up the fight to hold Wall Street accountable.

Amazon Warehouse Workers Head To Supreme Court Over Unpaid Theft Screenings (HuffPo)

Dave Jamieson lays out the arguments in Integrity Staffing Solutions v. Busk, which broadly looks at whether employers can require nonessential tasks – like security screenings – off the clock.

The Great Wage Slowdown of the 21st Century (NYT)

David Leonhardt examines President Obama's optimistic take on why wage growth will finally start to pick up in the next few years. Leonhardt isn't quite sold.

John Boehner Just Admitted on Twitter That Republicans Have No Jobs Plan (TNR)

Danny Vinik says that while it's fun to joke about Boehner's empty tweet, the truth is that without a real jobs plan, Republicans have caused significant damage to the economy.

Tens of Thousands of Walmart Workers Are About to Lose Their Health Insurance — and It's Good News! (Vox)

Sarah Kliff explains that while Walmart's decision was almost certainly based on saving money, this gives part-time workers access to subsidies on the exchanges and cheap insurance.

Share This

Daily Digest - October 7: How Wall Street Wins When Cities Are in Debt

Oct 7, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

Is Wall Street Making a Killing Off Cities’ Debt? (Next City)

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

Is Wall Street Making a Killing Off Cities’ Debt? (Next City)

In an illustrated essay, Susie Cagle shows how Wall Street profits off swap deals tied to cities' municipal bonds. Roosevelt Institute Fellow Saqib Bhatti explains pension obligation bonds.

Will the UN’s New Development Goals Downplay the Need for Gender Equality? (The Nation)

Barbara Crossette questions if reproductive rights will be given sufficient emphasis, drawing on the Roosevelt Institute's Women and Girls Rising Conference for female leaders' opinions.

Tax Cuts Uber Alles (Slate)

Jamelle Bouie explains why Paul Ryan needs a pretty unreliable mathematical model, known as dynamic scoring, to sell his proposed tax cuts as good for the economy.

Embrace the Irony (New Yorker)

Lawrence Lessig is attempting to destroy big money's influence in politics. All he needs, writes Evans Osnos, is for 50 billionaires to fund his SuperPAC.

Wages Should be Growing Faster, But They’re Not. Here’s Why. (WaPo)

Jared Bernstein suggests that raising wages is no longer part of American employers' model, and that wages won't increase until the labor market is much tighter.

SRC Cancels Teachers' Contract (Philadelphia Inquirer)

Kristen Graham and Martha Woodall report on the Philadelphia School Reform Commission's unexpected decision to unilaterally cancel the teachers' union contract.

New on Next New Deal

At NextGen IL Conference, Young People Set the Agenda for Their State

As attendees of the conference, the Campus Network's Midwestern Regional Team found themselves in a policy space where the goals and agenda were shaped entirely by their peers.

Share This

Daily Digest - October 6: Despite New Rules, Corporations Still Seek Tax Loopholes

Oct 6, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Are Obama's New Corporate Tax Rules Working? (Melissa Harris-Perry)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Are Obama's New Corporate Tax Rules Working? (Melissa Harris-Perry)

As guest host, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren moderates a discussion of corporations' attempts to dodge paying taxes through loopholes like inversion.

Unemployment is Finally Under 6 Percent, But Don’t Expect a Raise Anytime Soon (WaPo)

Matt O'Brien says that while the September jobs report was solid, continued "shadow unemployment" and low wage growth will keep the Fed from increasing interest rates just yet.

Facebook’s Bus Drivers Seek Union (NYT)

The drivers who shuttle Facebook employees to their Silicon Valley offices, unhappy with their low pay and difficult split shift schedule, are seeking to unionize through the Teamsters, writes Steven Greenhouse.

The U.S. Has a Jobs Crisis. Here's How to Fix It (The Guardian)

Heidi Moore speaks to four experts – two politicians and two economists – about the best ways to solve the jobs crisis. Common themes include immigration reform and a minimum wage hike.

Huh? Walmart Foundation Battles Hunger As Walmart Workers Turn to Food Stamps (Inside Philanthropy)

David Callahan critiques Walmart for its big charitable push to solve hunger when it has been widely documented that its own workers are relying on the social safety net to eat.

U.S. Restaurant Patrons Support Minimum Wage Hike (Reuters)

Lisa Baertlein contrasts the restaurant industry's lobbying against raising the minimum wage with a new survey that shows broad support for a higher wage among its customers.

New on Next New Deal

A Crisis Turned Catastrophe in Texas

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn explains how the latest court decision on Texas's anti-abortion laws will bring Texas women's access to reproductive health care to the brink of disaster.

The Big Mistake in President Obama’s Economic Pivot: Overlooking the Grassroots

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Director Joelle Gamble says the President would be better served by focusing on local rather than federal initiatives to improve the economy.

Share This

Daily Digest - October 3: Will the Senate Deny Minimum Wage to Home Care Workers?

Oct 3, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

GOP Senators: Don’t Raise Home Care Worker Wages (The Hill)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

GOP Senators: Don’t Raise Home Care Worker Wages (The Hill)

Ramsey Cox reports that this group of Senators claims giving home care workers minimum wage is unaffordable because of increased costs for Medicaid.

S.F., Oakland at Forefront of U.S. Minimum Wage Movement (SF Chronicle)

A proposition on the ballot this November will raise San Francisco's minimum wage to $15 an hour by July 2018, and it's expected to pass by wide margins, writes John Coté.

Americans Have No Idea How the Government Spends Money (WaPo)

Christopher Ingraham reports on a quiz given by the Pew Research Center. The results show that a third of Americans incorrectly think the government spends more on foreign aid than Social Security.

What to Watch on Jobs Day: Nominal Wages, Teacher Gap, and Upward Revisions (Working Economics)

Elise Gould explains why these three data points will be her focus in analyzing the jobs report, and says this month is a good time to look at the teacher gap to see whether public education jobs have bounced back.

People Who Warned the Fed Are Very Smart and Very Wrong (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Peter Coy looks back at a 2010 letter from a group of economists to the Federal Reserve, which warned against quantitative easing. He shares some of the writers' explanations for their incorrect predictions.

Poverty Isn't Just About Not Having Much; It's About Never Knowing How Much You're Going to Have (Vox)

Danielle Kurtzleben looks at data on the vast swings in monthly income that low-to-moderate-income households experience, which make it nearly impossible to plan ahead.

Chart: The Typical White Family Is 20 Times Wealthier Than the Typical Black Family (Mother Jones)

Dave Gilson explains that while the income gap between white and Black households is significant, the wealth gap is even greater – and it's the wealth gap that sustains generational inequality.

 

Share This

Wall Street Swindled Local Governments, Too. Here’s How They Can Get Their Money Back.

Sep 17, 2014Saqib Bhatti

Predatory lenders drove municipal governments and taxpayers into debt with risky interest rate swap deals that may have violated federal regulations.

The story of how Wall Street banks steered unsuspecting homebuyers towards complex mortgages with hidden risks and hidden costs has been well-documented. In fact, the typical sales pitch for adjustable-rate mortgages was premised on the false notion that home values never fall and that borrowers could refinance their loans before interest rates jumped.

Predatory lenders drove municipal governments and taxpayers into debt with risky interest rate swap deals that may have violated federal regulations.

The story of how Wall Street banks steered unsuspecting homebuyers towards complex mortgages with hidden risks and hidden costs has been well-documented. In fact, the typical sales pitch for adjustable-rate mortgages was premised on the false notion that home values never fall and that borrowers could refinance their loans before interest rates jumped.

Less widely understood is the fact that a very similar story played out with cities, states, and other municipal borrowers that were also steered into predatory interest rate swap deals riddled with hidden risks and hidden costs. Banks pitched these deals as a way for municipalities to save money on bond issuances: instead of issuing a traditional bond that had a fixed interest rate, they could take out a cheaper variable-rate bond that had an adjustable interest rate, but use a swap to protect against the risk of interest rate spikes.

Under this structure, municipalities made fixed-rate payments to banks on their swap deals, while the banks gave them back a variable-rate payment that was intended to offset the interest rate that the municipality had to pay its bondholders. The idea was that this would allow borrowers to get a “synthetic fixed rate” on their debt that was cheaper than what they would have to pay on a comparable conventional fixed-rate bond.

However, there were numerous risks embedded in these deals. For example:

  • The variable interest rate that the banks paid to the municipality could fall short of the rate that the municipality owed bondholders, creating a shortfall.
  • These deals contained many termination clauses that would allow the banks to cancel the deals and charge municipalities tens or even hundreds of millions in termination penalties.
  • Rather than rising, interest rates could crater, causing the net payments on the swap deals to skyrocket and leaving the municipalities unable to take advantage of the low-interest environment unless they terminated their swaps and paid hefty termination penalties.

Even though banks tried to downplay or dismiss these risks in order to push interest rate swaps, all of them materialized in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis:

  • When interest rates on a type of variable-rate bond known as an auction rate security shot up, the bank payments on the corresponding swaps could not cover those payments, and cities and states across the country were stuck paying double-digit interest rates to bondholders.
  • When Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy and defaulted on its swap payments with municipalities, it triggered termination clauses on the bank’s swaps. In an ironic twist, cities and states actually had to pay penalties to Lehman because of the way the termination clauses were written.
  • When the Federal Reserve slashed interest rates in response to the financial crash, it also drove down variable rates on swaps, causing the net payments on the swaps for cities and states to soar and preventing taxpayers from enjoying any of the benefits from the low rate environment.

As a result, municipalities across the country have been hit with large bills to Wall Street at the same time that they are trying to close record budget shortfalls amid the biggest economic downturn in 80 years. The Detroit Water and Sewage Department is shutting off water to families who have missed just a couple of payments on their water bill so that it can pay off more than $500 million in termination penalties on its swaps. The City of Chicago is now paying $72 million a year on its swaps as a result of the low interest rates, even as entire neighborhoods on the south and west sides of the city fall into disrepair. The school district in Chicago is paying another $36 million a year on swaps, while the Board of Education is invoking budget problems to justify the largest mass school closing in national history. In Wisconsin, the state is now paying $25 million a year on its swaps and making catastrophic cuts to state healthcare programs. These are just a few examples of a trend cropping up everywhere in the U.S.

It is no accident that the same communities that were disproportionately targeted for predatory mortgages are also bearing the brunt of these predatory municipal finance deals. Across the country, working class communities of color are disproportionately impacted by cuts to public services, and austerity measures serve to exacerbate the crisis in those communities in particular.

Luckily, there is something that public officials can do to stop the bleeding. Under Rule G-17 of the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (MSRB), a federal regulator charged with protecting the interests of municipal borrowers, banks that pitch deals to public officials must “deal fairly” with them. According to the MSRB, this means that they “must not misrepresent or omit the facts, risks, potential benefits, or other material information about municipal securities activities undertaken with the municipal issuer.” In other words, they must not downplay the risks associated with deals like interest rate swaps, and they must not mislead public officials about the likelihood of such risks materializing. The banks must ensure that public officials truly understand the risks of the deals they enter into.

This is a burden that was not met in the typical swap transaction. As a rule, bankers highlighted the upside and minimized the potential downside in pitching these deals. This was in violation of MSRB Rule G-17 and municipalities like Chicago and Detroit have legal recourse to potentially win back hundreds of millions from Wall Street. Cities, states, and other municipal borrowers can pursue these legal claims by filing for arbitration with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA).

The Baldwin County Sewer Service, a privatized utility in Alabama, successfully used a similar legal argument earlier this year to win back its swap payments and get out of its deals without any termination penalties. The total value of the award was approximately $10 million. The potential claims could be many magnitudes higher for cities and states that had significantly greater swap exposure.

However, officials in municipalities with swaps need to act fast, because time may be running out. FINRA has a six-year eligibility period on these claims. Because many of the risks associated with swaps materialized in October 2008, when interest rates plummeted as a result of the federal response to the financial crisis, it is possible that the clock could run out on these claims as early as October 2014. Public officials like Mayor Rahm Emanuel in Chicago and Governor Scott Walker in Wisconsin should act now to potentially recover millions for their constituents before it is too late.

Saqib Bhatti is a Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute and Director of the ReFund America Project.

Image via Thinkstock

Share This

Daily Digest - September 10: Could a Left-Wing Tea Party Unite Progressives?

Sep 10, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Why We Need a Left Wing Tea Party (The Daily Beast)

Click here to subscribe to Roosevelt First, our weekday morning email featuring the Daily Digest.

Why We Need a Left Wing Tea Party (The Daily Beast)

Sally Kohn calls on progressive factions to follow the Tea Party's lead and throw all their weight behind uncompromising candidates who are strong on every progressive issue.

Labor Market Unchanged According to July Job Openings Data (EPI)

Comparing job openings data to unemployment, Elise Gould points out that over half of the unemployed were not going to find work in July no matter what they did, because the jobs don't exist.

Government Debt Isn't the Problem—Private Debt Is (The Atlantic)

Richard Vague writes that financial crises can be tied to too-high and rapidly growing private debt, which means policy solutions need to focus on debt relief for low- and middle-income people.

Were Fast-Food Workers Paid to Strike and Protest? (The Guardian)

The answer is no, writes Jana Kasperkevic. That rumor is a corruption of the union strike fund, a pool set aside to help pay for striking workers' arrest fines and lost wages.

Warren Faults Banking Regulators for Lack of Criminal Prosecutions (WSJ)

While Senator Warren focused on the Federal Reserve, Senator Shelby blamed the DoJ for seeking fines instead of jail time for banking executives, report Ryan Tracy and Victoria McGrane.

Want to Fix the Jobs Crisis? Build a Federally Funded Worker Education Infrastructure (TAP)

Good job training programs – the kind that see both students and employers as clients – can be highly successful, writes Paul Osterman, but they're small and difficult to scale up.

The OECD’s Latest Report is Burdened by Economic Myths (AJAM)

Philip Pilkington says that until economic policymakers stop assuming that economies rebalance themselves and that high government debt is the real problem, good policy change is unlikely.

Share This

Taxes Are Never Just a Class Issue

Sep 4, 2014Joelle Gamble

Tax reforms can't solve all economic inequality, because they won't change the reality of race in the U.S. economy.

Tax reforms can't solve all economic inequality, because they won't change the reality of race in the U.S. economy.

The threat of corporate inversions to the American tax base sprung an interesting political dialogue around tax reform in the United States. We’ve seen debates on how to stop the spread of inversions and arguments that they aren’t a problem at all. Some call for the abolition of the corporate tax rate as a whole and others completely reject such suggestions. I find these discussions of tax reform and its effects on the economy informative yet simultaneously slightly disappointing.

What bothers me about how tax reform debates shake out is how absent they can become of socio-political realities, particularly the reality of race.

One line of progressive argumentation follows simply: If everyone pays their fair share of taxes, we can support public spending and job growth, and we’ll all do better. The argument firmly stands, but there is an important caveat.

It’s easy to harken back to the 1950s when tax rates were high, social services were relatively steady and economic security stretched across economic strata. But who was really secure then? Even the high points of job security for the American economy still left African Americans (and other racially marginalized groups) behind. This a structural phenomenon, instituted by socially racist institutions and a deep history of systemically harming the Black community.

We can’t take race out of conversations around economic inequality. The reality of race is that even fixes to the broader federal revenue landscape don’t always address the structural barriers of racism. A rising tide can’t lift all boats, if some boats are bolted to the seafloor.

Black unemployment consistently exceeds that of whites, both post-Recession and since such data has been available. Gaps between white unemployment and black unemployment shrank in 2009. This was not due to falling black unemployment but instead due to skyrocketing white unemployment.

This racial gap in economic success extends beyond the employment rate. In fact, it is deeply entrenched in the way wealth is distributed in the U.S. The gap between median Black wealth and median white wealth stands at about $236,000 dollars. Flagrant discrimination, in part, contributes to this gap. But it is perpetuated by generations of asset accumulation policies that are targeted at those who already own assets.

Corporate tax reform alone isn’t sufficient to fix the effects of decades of second-class status conferred on African Americans. The government does not just need sufficient funding to create equality within the economy. Distribution of these dollars is equally important. It needs to reflect the nuances of structural inequalities built into multiple aspects of our tax code.

Take federal housing spending policies as a prime example. Ending ineffective tax incentives, such as the mortgage interest reduction, can start to tilt the scales toward those who are not already wealthy. Seventy-seven percent of the benefits of the mortgage interest reduction accrued to homeowners with gross incomes of above $100,000. We need to rethink housing subsidies so that the benefits of federal programs do not heavily favor those who already own homes.

We need corporate tax reform to ensure that all participants in our economy are paying their fair share. But we also need a federal benefits structure that ensures that the concept of a "fair share" considers our history of discrimination when determining which Americans need those benefits most.

Joelle Gamble is the National Director of the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network.

Share This

Daily Digest - August 29: A Rising Minimum Wage Lifts All Boats

Aug 29, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

There will not be a new Daily Digest on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day. The Daily Digest will return on Tuesday, September 2.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

Who Stands to Benefit from San Diego’s Minimum Wage Hike (Voice of San Diego)

There will not be a new Daily Digest on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day. The Daily Digest will return on Tuesday, September 2.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

Who Stands to Benefit from San Diego’s Minimum Wage Hike (Voice of San Diego)

Lisa Halverstadt speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt about her research team's estimate that 172,000 workers could get a raise from San Diego's minimum wage hike.

The Biggest Tax Scam Ever (Rolling Stone)

Tim Dickinson looks at the range of multinational tax avoidance strategies in use today, from inversions to offshoring. It's all legal, he says, but the law itself is broken.

De Blasio Zeroes in on Expanding Living Wage (Capital New York)

New York City's mayor looks to require more businesses, including retail tenants of subsidized developments, to pay a living wage, report Dana Rubinstein and Sally Goldenberg.

Market Basket's Popular CEO Arthur T Goes Rogue and Wins – Now What? (The Guardian)

After months of employee protests on his behalf, Market Basket's former CEO has bought out his cousins to regain control. Jana Kasperkevic says he'll face new challenges from shareholders.

AFL-CIO’s Trumka: Democrats Need New Economic Team in 2016 (WSJ)

The labor union president wants 2016 candidates to avoid economics advisors who have participated in the revolving door of government and Wall Street, reports Eric Morath.

Americans Foresee Unending Economic Doom (Vox)

Danielle Kurtzleben looks at a new study from Rutgers which shows that a growing number of Americans believe the last recession permanently scarred the economy and that government can't help.

Pregnant Women Just Earned More Workplace Rights in Illinois (The Nation)

The new law establishes civil rights protections for pregnant workers, which will help them to stay in the workplace if they want to, writes Michelle Chen.

Share This

Pages