Daily Digest - August 29: A Rising Minimum Wage Lifts All Boats

Aug 29, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

There will not be a new Daily Digest on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day. The Daily Digest will return on Tuesday, September 2.

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Who Stands to Benefit from San Diego’s Minimum Wage Hike (Voice of San Diego)

There will not be a new Daily Digest on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day. The Daily Digest will return on Tuesday, September 2.

Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

Who Stands to Benefit from San Diego’s Minimum Wage Hike (Voice of San Diego)

Lisa Halverstadt speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Annette Bernhardt about her research team's estimate that 172,000 workers could get a raise from San Diego's minimum wage hike.

The Biggest Tax Scam Ever (Rolling Stone)

Tim Dickinson looks at the range of multinational tax avoidance strategies in use today, from inversions to offshoring. It's all legal, he says, but the law itself is broken.

De Blasio Zeroes in on Expanding Living Wage (Capital New York)

New York City's mayor looks to require more businesses, including retail tenants of subsidized developments, to pay a living wage, report Dana Rubinstein and Sally Goldenberg.

Market Basket's Popular CEO Arthur T Goes Rogue and Wins – Now What? (The Guardian)

After months of employee protests on his behalf, Market Basket's former CEO has bought out his cousins to regain control. Jana Kasperkevic says he'll face new challenges from shareholders.

AFL-CIO’s Trumka: Democrats Need New Economic Team in 2016 (WSJ)

The labor union president wants 2016 candidates to avoid economics advisors who have participated in the revolving door of government and Wall Street, reports Eric Morath.

Americans Foresee Unending Economic Doom (Vox)

Danielle Kurtzleben looks at a new study from Rutgers which shows that a growing number of Americans believe the last recession permanently scarred the economy and that government can't help.

Pregnant Women Just Earned More Workplace Rights in Illinois (The Nation)

The new law establishes civil rights protections for pregnant workers, which will help them to stay in the workplace if they want to, writes Michelle Chen.

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Daily Digest - August 19: With Inequality, It's Women and Children First

Aug 19, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Among the Poor, Women Feel Inequality More Deeply (NYT)

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Among the Poor, Women Feel Inequality More Deeply (NYT)

The burden of inequality falls more heavily on poor women, says Patricia Cohen, because they are more likely to be raising a family and get little support for the "second shift" of household management.

Blame Employers, Not Workers, for Any Skills Gap, Economist Says (WSJ)

Josh Zombrun looks at a new working paper from a University of Pennsylvania economist, which argues that employers who complain about lack of skills are accountable for refusing to provide training.

The Hunger Crisis in America’s Universities (MSNBC)

Ned Resnikoff reports on how colleges across the country are tackling rising food insecurity. Many are looking to Michigan State University, home of an established campus food pantry, for guidance.

A Co-op State of Mind (In These Times)

Ajowa Nzinga Ifateyo looks at the rise of worker cooperatives in New York City in light of the City Council's new $1.2 million initiative to support and grow such enterprises.

What Does the Fed Have to do with Social Security? Plenty (AJAM)

Dean Baker notes that Federal Reserve policy can influence unemployment rates, and when more people work, especially in low- and middle- wage jobs, Social Security revenues increase.

How Outdated Parking Laws Price Families Out of the City (CityLab)

A-P Hurd argues that requiring developers to build parking lifts the costs of housing out of the affordable range for most families. Hurd looks at a more family-friendly urban housing model.

New on Next New Deal

Curbing Campus Sexual Assault is Not About the Money

Campus Network's Hannah Zhang responds to critics of the Campus Accountability and Safety Act who call the bill's fines outsized to the problem of sexual assault on campuses.

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Daily Digest - August 15: Social Security at 79

Aug 15, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Social Security Marks 79th Birthday with Declining Service (WaPo)

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Social Security Marks 79th Birthday with Declining Service (WaPo)

Joe Davidson says that the Social Security Administration continues to aim for providing "the best possible service for the American public," but budget and staffing cuts have hampered that goal.

  • Roosevelt Take: Campus Network member Brian Lamberta calls for eliminating the cap on Social Security taxes to ensure the program's sustainability through Millennials' retirements and beyond.

Starbucks to Revise Policies to End Irregular Schedules for Its 130,000 Baristas (NYT)

In response to an article in The New York Times about a single mother's struggle with erratic scheduling, Starbucks plans to revise its scheduling practices to improve worker stability, writes Jodi Kantor.

Why the Minimum Wage Issue is a Win-Win for Obama (MSNBC)

Timothy Noah explains that if Congress won't pass a minimum wage increase, then Democrats have an easy wedge issue for the 2014 elections, which is especially important as they fight to hold the Senate.

Education Alone Is Not the Answer to Income Inequality and Slow Recovery (TAP)

Many economists are emphasizing education as a way to spread the economic recovery beyond the 1 percent, but Robert Kuttner argues for a job-creating solution instead: infrastructure investment.

It's Time to Pay Prisoners the Minimum Wage (TNR)

Josh Kovensky argues that using prison labor as a cost-cutting measure is ineffective and creates unexpected costs, particularly relating to the dependents of prisoners.

When Your Employer Doesn’t Consider You an Employee (AJAM)

The recently proposed Payroll Fraud Prevention Act would help balance power in the workplace by ensuring workers know their rights as employees or contractors, writes Malcolm Harris.

Why it’s No Easy Task to Determine What the GSEs Should Charge for Their Guarantee (MetroTrends Blog)

Laurie Goodman, Ellen Seidman, Jim Parrott, and Jun Zhu lay out the difficulties in determining what fees Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac should charge for guaranteeing mortgage-backed securities.

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Daily Digest - August 13: Working Without a Net in the Gig Economy

Aug 13, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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America's Social Safety Net is Failing Workers in the 'Gig Economy' (The Week)

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America's Social Safety Net is Failing Workers in the 'Gig Economy' (The Week)

Particularly in today's economy of short-term gigs, contract work, and other forms of precarious employment, Sarah Jaffe says the current system of unemployment benefits isn't cutting it.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Operations Director Lydia Bowers looks at some of the other labor protections missing in the gig economy.

By Any Measure, The Job Market Is Getting Better (FiveThirtyEight)

No matter how he counts the unemployed, Ben Casselman finds the same pattern: the ratio of job-seekers to available jobs has dropped significantly, almost to pre-recession levels.

Graphic: Unpaid Interns Have Few Legal Rights (Bloomberg Businessweek)

In this flowchart, Josh Eidelson lays out the scant legal protections afforded interns throughout the country, with details about relevant court cases and state-by-state variations.

Yellen Resolved to Avoid Raising Rates Too Soon, Fearing Downturn (Reuters)

Howard Schneider and Jonathan Spicer report that Federal Reserve insiders say Janet Yellen is showing extreme caution on raising interest rates, because inflation is easier to fight than recessions.

Another Argument Against the Medicaid Expansion Just Got Weaker (WaPo)

Jason Millman looks at the history of Medicaid funding, and finds that states don't really have to worry about the federal government backing out of its share of expansion funding.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn ties refusal to expand Medicaid to the U.S.'s high and increasing maternal mortality rate.

The Jobs Added In Today’s Economy Pay A Quarter Less Than The Ones We Lost In The Recession (ThinkProgress)

Bryce Covert looks at a new report from the U.S. Council of Mayors, which shows that the jobs added since the recession pay less largely due to the sectors in which jobs were lost and regained.

Labor and Small Businesses Team up on California Franchising Law (MSNBC)

The proposed law would make it harder to terminate franchise agreements. Ned Resnikoff says labor groups hope franchisees will treat workers better with less franchisor influence and interference.

New on Next New Deal

The Inconvenient Truth About Ineqality

In his video speculation for the Next American Economy project, Lenny Mendonca says a "vested set of interests" will keep the issues raised in Piketty's Capital out of real policy debates.

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Daily Digest - August 12: What Happens When the Workers Become the Owners?

Aug 12, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Is Worker Ownership a Way Forward for Market Basket? (Truthout)

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Is Worker Ownership a Way Forward for Market Basket? (Truthout)

Gar Alperovitz says the current protests at Market Basket are a sign of the desire for community and worker-friendly businesses, which he suggests are easier to achieve with employee ownership.

Surprise! North Carolina Cuts to Jobless Benefits Did Not Help Workers (TAP)

Valerie Wilson lays out the data, which shows that cutting the duration and amount of unemployment benefits did not magically improve the job market in North Carolina.

New York Prosecutors Charge Payday Lenders With Usury (NYT)

State prosecutors charged a group of lenders incorporated across the country with shared (and obscured) ownership of charging illegal interest rates to New Yorkers, reports Jessica Silver-Greenberg.

Give the President (and Yourself) a Break (U.S. News & World Report)

Instead of griping about the President's vacation, lawmakers should work to ensure that all Americans get paid vacation time and are able to use it, writes Pat Garofalo.

Unions Team Up With Fast-Food Owners (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Patrick Clark looks at the uneasy alliance between fast food franchisees and labor unions as they push for fairer franchising laws in California, which unions hope would translate into better working conditions.

It Matters How Rich the Rich Are (Policy Shop)

Matt Bruenig says that we must know how rich the rich are in order to fight poverty, since the distribution of wealth creates poverty. He also asks how we would know if policy is working without that data.

How Student Debt Crushes Your Chances of Buying a Home (WaPo)

Dina ElBoghdady looks at a new study that lays out the complex ways student debt interacts with homeownership, including a close look at total amount of debt and size of payments.

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Daily Digest - August 11: Big Business's Frenemy in the White House

Aug 11, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Your Call: The U.S.-Africa Summit and Corporate Taxes (KALW)

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Your Call: The U.S.-Africa Summit and Corporate Taxes (KALW)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal discusses President Obama's interview with The Economist, and explains the administration's relationship with big business. His segment begins at 34:00.

Libertarian Fantasies (NYT)

Paul Krugman says that the libertarian vision of society bears little resemblance to reality, and references Mike Konczal's recent piece on libertarians and basic guaranteed income as an example.

Paul Ryan's Magical Poverty Tour (AJAM)

Susan Greenbaum points to an existing welfare block grant – the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program – as proof that Ryan's plan would not serve enough of the eligible families.

Franchise Association Sues Over Seattle’s $15 Wage (MSNBC)

The law requires large businesses, including franchisees, to raise wages faster than smaller ones. Franchisees claims this discriminates against their business model, reports Ned Resnikoff.

Decline in 'Slack' Helps Fed Gauge Recovery (WSJ)

Pedro da Costa explains how the gap between economic resources we have and those that we use, particularly in the labor market, is influencing Federal Reserve decisions about interest rates.

Fed's Fischer Calls U.S. and Global Recoveries Disappointing (Reuters)

Howard Schneider reports on Federal Reserve Vice Chair Stanley Fischer's concerns regarding how central banks must respond to the possibility of permanently slowed growth post-recession.

‘Eat Your Vegetables’ Is Easier for Low-Income Mothers Who Get Help (Pacific Standard)

A new study shows financial incentives at farmers' markets do work to increase vegetable consumption, writes Avital Andrews, which makes a strong case for government nutrition incentives.

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Daily Digest - August 5: Basic Needs Shouldn't Need to Be Bought

Aug 5, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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The Real Solution to Wealth Inequality (The Nation)

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The Real Solution to Wealth Inequality (The Nation)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal and Bryce Covert write that instead of trying to increase individuals' purchasing power, basic needs should just be taken off the market altogether.

Why Is the Economy Still Weak? Blame These Five Sectors (NYT)

Neil Irwin examines the possible causes for the underperformance of several economic sectors based on careful predictions of what their output ought to be in a healthier economy.

The NLRB-McDonald's Ruling Could be the Beginning of a Franchise War (LA Times)

Michael Hiltzik suggests that as the National Labor Relations Board places more responsibility on franchisors like McDonald's, those companies will try to pass costs to their franchisees.

A University President Gave up $90,000 to Give His Minimum Wage Workers a Raise (Vox)

By reducing his own salary, the interim president of Kentucky State University has ensured a raise from $7.25 an hour to $10.25 an hour for the school's lowest-paid workers.

As Congress Adjourns, GOP Declares “Omission Accomplished” (OurFuture.org)

Congress left for summer recess with the GOP having blocked almost everything from passing, but Richard Eskow also calls out the Democrats for failing to give them more progressive proposals to block.

The United States Needs Corporate 'Loyalty Oaths' (The Daily Beast)

"Non-desertion agreements" as requirements for federal contractors would help to ensure companies choose to pay U.S. corporate taxes, writes Jonathan Alter.

New on Next New Deal

Will Syracuse Become New York's Second Economic Capital?

In her video speculation for the Next American Economy project, Amy Liu, Co-Director of the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings, predicts cities will step up as drivers of innovation and investment.

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Daily Digest - August 4: The Underappreciated Success of Financial Reform

Aug 4, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Obama’s Other Success (NYT)

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Obama’s Other Success (NYT)

Dodd-Frank financial reform is proving more successful than expected, writes Paul Krugman. He cites Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal in debunking the claim that the law created permanent bailouts.

The NFL Cheerleaders Should Be Your Fair-Pay Heroes (TNR)

Bryce Covert looks at what's needed to achieve wage growth in today's economy. She talks to Mike Konczal, who suggests that the Fed could help everyone's wages if it focused on unemployment.

Economy Adds 209,000 Jobs in July; Unemployment Rate Edges Up to 6.2 Percent (WaPo)

Ylan Q. Mui breaks down Friday's jobs report, which was generally positive but showed that underemployment (part-timers who want more hours) and long-term unemployment haven't budged.

Relying on Online Listings, Young Americans Struggle to Find Jobs (The Guardian)

Today's system of online job applications isn't making the search any easier, writes Jana Kasperkevic, as job-seekers find that their applications seem to disappear into black holes.

Work and Worth (Robert Reich)

Robert Reich emphasizes the difference between pay and value to society, given that kindergarten teachers and social workers make far less than hedge fund managers.

New on Next New Deal

The Worker-Owned Small Business Revolution

In his video speculation for the Next American Economy project, Gar Alperovitz predicts that as MBAs realize that worker-owned companies achieve higher productivity, the model will grow.

Thinking About the Women in Think Tanks

Bringing more women into the upper echelons of policy work will require engaging younger women in this work, writes Roosevelt Institute Summer Academy Fellow Hannah Zhang.

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Gar Alperovitz: The Worker-Owned Small Business Revolution

Aug 4, 2014

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, political economist Gar Alperovitz speculates on what could happen if workers claim power over small businesses.

The Next American Economy project brought together 30 experts from various disciplines to envision tomorrow's economic and political challenges and develop today's solutions. Their assignment: be bold, and leave the conventional wisdom -- and their own opinions -- behind. In today's video, political economist Gar Alperovitz speculates on what could happen if workers claim power over small businesses.

Gar Alperovitz, Professor of Political Economy at the University of Maryland, describes the potential for a future economic revolution: starting in Cleveland, small businesses will democratize ownership. From there, the model will spread to cities across the country. As MBAs begin to understand that productivity in worker-owned companies is higher than in traditional firms, the movement will continue to grow.

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Daily Digest - August 1: Too Big to Fail vs. Too Small to Matter

Aug 1, 2014

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An In-Depth Look at Campaign Finance Reform (MSNBC)

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An In-Depth Look at Campaign Finance Reform (MSNBC)

In this extended online segment, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren speaks with Zephyr Teachout about using multiple matching funds as a tool to increase the power of small donors.

Playing the ‘Who’s the Boss?’ Game with Employees (WaPo)

The National Labor Relations Board ruling that McDonald's can be held accountable for franchise labor violations sheds light on the ways employers try to dodge responsibility, writes Catherine Rampell.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute President and CEO Felicia Wong and Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch commented on the NLRB decision earlier this week.

‘Pension Smoothing’: The Gimmick Both Parties in Congress Love (NYT)

Josh Barro says pension smoothing, which increases revenues by allowing smaller pension contributions, and other gimmicks provide funding on too-short timelines, requiring another hunt for funds soon after.

Feds Say Big Banks Are Still Too Big to Fail (MoJo)

Despite Dodd-Frank's financial regulations, a new Government Accountability Office report says investors still expect bailouts if the largest banks fail, giving those banks advantages over smaller ones, writes Erika Eichelberger.

Hope Springs Eternal, But The Data Is Actually Pretty Mixed About Whether Or Not Recovery Is Accelerating (Working Economics)

Josh Bivens cautions against excitement about GDP and job growth as signs of a speedier recovery. The data isn't actually that strong, and he sees the potential for job growth to slow.

New on Next New Deal

Let's Hope the GAO Report Ends the Too-Big-to-Fail Subsidy Distraction

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal writes that the existence of a too-big-to-fail subsidy isn't as important or potentially destructive as the systemic problems of the financial system.

Education Left Behind

Edyta Obrzut, the Campus Network's NextGen Illinois Research Fellow, examines the challenges facing education policy in Illinois today, and the potential solutions put forward by NextGen caucuses.

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