Daily Digest - October 15: Fighting Global Inequality at Home

Oct 15, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Inequality Is a Choice (NYT)

Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz discusses a new divide between countries who attempt to do something about income inequality and countries that don't. If the U.S. and its peers aren't trying to make change, why should anyone else?

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Inequality Is a Choice (NYT)

Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz discusses a new divide between countries who attempt to do something about income inequality and countries that don't. If the U.S. and its peers aren't trying to make change, why should anyone else?

Living on $5,000 a Year, on Purpose: Meet America's 'intentional poor' (NBC News)

Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz looks at the lives of those who choose poverty as a lifestyle. She points out that choosing poverty is different from being poor: many who choose this lifestyle have a family safety net.

Nancy Pelosi on Sister Simone (Politico)

Rep. Nancy Pelosi writes about her admiration of Sister Simone Campbell, who will be awarded the Freedom of Worship medal at Wednesday's Four Freedoms Awards. Pelosi admires how Sister Simone's faith leads her to take action on behalf of the needy.

The Default has Already Begun (Reuters)

Felix Salmon argues that because global faith in U.S. financial institutions has already been shaken, for most purposes default has already started. The effects can't be stopped at this point, even though we haven't yet breached the debt ceiling.

A Government Above the People (Al Jazeera)

Sarah Kendzior says that when Republican congressmen suggest that furloughed federal workers take out expensive short-term loans during the shutdown, it's further proof of how disconnected government is from the people who rely on the social safety net, or even just their paychecks.

In Shutdown and Debt Ceiling Showdown, GOPers Ignore Their Party's Own Advice (MoJo)

David Corn compares the Republican's internal autopsy from March to their current behavior. The report was supposed to help the GOP make changes to appeal to a broader range of voters, but the party's actions are practically the opposite of the recommendations.

A Win For McJobs: Seattle's Mayoral Candidates Both Support a $15 Minimum Wage (The Atlantic)

Jordan Weissmann questions whether the support for fast food protesters' wage demands is just posturing. But even if it is, for any politician to start supporting a $15 per hour minimum wage should be seen as a great success in changing the narrative.

 

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Women Are Bearing the Brunt of Shutdown Fallout

Oct 11, 2013Andrea FlynnNataya Friedan

The "non-essential" programs that are currently unfunded due to the shutdown are in fact essential for many women and children.

The "non-essential" programs that are currently unfunded due to the shutdown are in fact essential for many women and children.

The GOP likes to say the war on women is a myth. But the government shutdown, now in its eleventh day, is just the latest evidence that it is indeed alive and well. It should be no surprise that women are among those hurt most by the closure, which, predictably, is in part a reaction to the benefits that the Affordable Care Act, President Obama’s signature achievement, guarantees women, as we wrote last week.

From the nation’s elite institutions to the oft-neglected rural areas of this country, women and their families are caught in the middle of a political impasse that has furloughed an estimated 800,000 government workers, threatens to upend the global economy, and has left critical government programs and services scrambling to secure emergency funds in order to serve America’s most vulnerable populations.

The shutdown threatens a number of programs and funding streams, including domestic violence shelters and service centers; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); the Woman, Infants, and Children Program (WIC); School Lunch; Head Start; and Title IX investigations of sexual assault on college campuses. This will have a serious impact on the health, physical safety, food security, and economic stability of women and their families.

Physical Safety

As Bryce Covert wrote last week, funds for domestic violence programs designated under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) have been suspended since October 4. (It should be no surprise that many of the House members leading the shutdown also voted against VAWA itself earlier this year.)

Small centers without access to independent funding – those that serve women with the fewest options – will only be able to weather the storm for so long. In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis and the ensuing economic downturn, violence against women has been on the rise, with eight out of 10 shelters reporting increases in the number of women seeking help, and 74 percent of domestic violence victims staying in unsafe situations because of economic insecurity.  Demand for these services is increasing, while funding is being cut from every source. Nearly four out of five of domestic violence service providers have reported decreases in government funding over the past five years, and since October 1, many have closed their doors completely or limited their services.

The shutdown is also affecting the safety of women on college and university campuses across the country. An increasing number of institutions are under investigation for ineffective handling of sexual assault cases adjudicated under Title IX.

And with the shutdown, the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights has suspended investigations into alleged violations and has halted campus visits necessary for holding institutions accountable.  

Food Security

The shutdown threatens the food assistance on which millions of America’s most vulnerable women and children rely. At this point, federal funding for TANF, WIC, and school lunches has been suspended. State and USDA reserve funds are being reallocated so that states can continue to provide these essential services, but they will only be able to function with these limited resources for a short time.

States are shouldering the burden to keep TANF running while the government is shuttered, but last week, 5,200 eligible families in Arizona did not receive their monthly check. Thus far Arizona has been the only state to deny this important benefit for families in need, but every day the program is more strained.

WIC, the federal program that most crucially provides formula and breastfeeding assistance for mothers in need, has also been left in the lurch. On Tuesday, officials announced that no additional WIC vouchers would be issued in the state of North Carolina, where approximately 264,000 women rely on the program. In Utah, the WIC program shut its doors and only reopened four days later because the USDA provided a $2.5 million emergency grant. Other centers are sure to face the same challenges so long as workers are furloughed and grants are on hold.

Economic Security

Head Start programs that provide childcare and education for 7,200 low-income children ages 0-5 did not receive grants due on October 1. Thousands of low-income women are able to go to work every day because their children participate in Head Start programs. Without them, women already struggling in low-wage jobs and lacking benefits are forced to miss work, because no one else is able to care for their children. For women, secure employment is contingent on secure childcare and education for their families. The New York Times reported that programs in six states had closed due to the shutdown and then reopened temporarily thanks to a $10 million gift from a couple in Texas. Head Start will continue as a result of this short-term rescue, but private philanthropy will not be able to do the job of the government over the long term.

In sum, what some define as non-essential government services are, in fact, essential to the economic and physical well-being of America's most vulnerable women and their families. It’s just another variation on the old adage that one man’s public interest may be another’s tyranny – in this instance, largely tyranny over women and children.

Andrea Flynn is a Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute. She researches and writes about access to reproductive health care in the United States. You can follow her on Twitter @dreaflynn.

Nataya Friedan is a recent graduate of Columbia University working for the Roosevelt Institute’s Women Rising program.

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Daily Digest - September 30: A Bad Policy News Moment

Sep 30, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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The House’s Food Stamps Cuts Aren’t Just Cruel. They’re Dumb. (WaPo)

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The House’s Food Stamps Cuts Aren’t Just Cruel. They’re Dumb. (WaPo)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal explains why the GOP's plan to require states to follow a $2,000 assets test for SNAP eligibility is bad policy. Assets tests create poverty traps, forcing families to avoid saving in order to stay afloat.

Countdown to Shutdown: A Primer on Where Budget Wrangling Stands (The Atlantic)

David A. Graham writes an update on what's happened in Congress over the weekend. So far, Republicans have been unwilling to pass a clean continuing resolution in the House, and the schedule for today allows only ten hours of legislative work time.

Who Will Notice a US Government Shut Down? Public Workers, Foreign Governments and People With the Flu (Quartz)

Tim Fernholz lays out who will feel the immediate effects of a government shutdown on October 1, which looks exceedingly likely. The less obvious groups include sick people, since the CDC will stop tracking epidemics, and anyone who planned to buy a house in October.

This Week in Poverty: Five Things You Might Have Missed on 'Poverty Day' (The Nation)

Greg Kaufmann looks at five points from the U.S. Census poverty data that weren't covered by mainstream media. Most strikingly, instituting a monthly benefit for every child as is common in other developed countries could nearly eliminate child poverty in the U.S.

I Worked All Week for Free?!: The Horrifying, True Story of $0 Paychecks (Salon)

Josh Eidelson explains why a group of guest workers on H-2B visas are striking and putting pressure on Florida politicians to reform labor laws. After putting in a full week, these workers are charged rent that is greater then their earnings - and the boss is also the landlord.

Viewpoint: The Decline of Unions Is Your Problem Too (TIME)

Eric Liu explains why every American is harmed by the lowest rate of union membership in 97 years. Organized labor used to keep the economy healthier; today, the people setting the rules are only focused on shareholder profits.

New on Next New Deal

"Inequality for All" is "The Progressive Economic Narrative: The Movie"

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch reviews the new film starring Robert Reich, which articulates the narrative that progressive economists have been pushing through Reich's humor and passion, as well as profiles of families scarred by the new economy.

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Daily Digest - September 23: Fishing For Solutions to Underwater Mortgages

Sep 23, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Is Richmond’s Mortgage Seizure Scheme Even Legal? (WaPo)

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Is Richmond’s Mortgage Seizure Scheme Even Legal? (WaPo)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal looks at the questions raised by Richmond, CA's proposal to use eminent domain to reduce underwater mortgage debt. He argues that the plan has plenty of legal precedent, and clear benefits for the residents of Richmond.

Mike Konczal on Economic Collapse, Hugh MacMillan on Fracking Study (CounterSpin)

Mike appears on FAIR's weekly radio show to discuss what has and hasn't changed in the five years since Lehman Brothers's bankruptcy. He argues that the crisis really started in 2007, with the first wave of foreclosures on subprime mortgages.

This Week in Poverty: New Data, Same Story (and Same Dangerous House Republicans) (The Nation)

Greg Kaufmann sees the latest Census data on poverty as proof that even though the needed steps in the fight against poverty are known, they aren't being implemented. Unfortunately, all the policies he wants to see are anathema to the GOP.

Jackie Speier Protests Food Stamp Cuts With Steak, Vodka, Caviar (HuffPo)

Robin Wilkey reports on Rep. Speier's speech calling out her peers who favor cutting SNAP for their excessive travel bills paid by the government. But caviar and filet must come before necessities for the poor, since the $40 billion in cuts passed.

American Bile (NYT)

Robert Reich argues that Americans are divided over many issues, but their anger comes from stagnant economic growth and widening inequality. The people who see the economy as rigged against them, whether by government or business, are the angriest.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline and Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network will join Reich for a conference call on his new film "Inequality for All" on Wednesday.

It's the Austerity, Stupid: How We Were Sold an Economy-Killing Lie (MoJo)

Kevin Drum explains how the now-infamous Reinhart and Rogoff paper on debt as a killer of economic growth kicked off the austerity regime that has reduced U.S. economic growth by as much as two percent. It's been disproved, but we're still on the austerity train.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal was one of the first to look at the UMass paper that disproved the Reinhart-Rogoff paper.

The Shutdown Showdown: What Happens Now? (MSNBC)

Kasie Hunt looks at the likely timeline for the continuing resolution now moving into the Senate, which contains language defunding the Affordable Care Act. It's expected that Harry Reid will strip out that language before the Senate passes the bill.

The Most Important Lesson the Fed Taught the World This Week (The Atlantic)

Zachary Karabell argues that the Fed's announcement of no taper for now is a reminder that there is no certainty in markets. There's no excuse for businesses using "uncertainty" as a reason to not hire, especially when they then blame government dysfunction.

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Daily Digest - September 20: The Last Five Years of Financial Crisis

Sep 20, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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What We Get Wrong When We Talk About ‘The Financial Crisis’ (Majority Report)

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What We Get Wrong When We Talk About ‘The Financial Crisis’ (Majority Report)

Sam Seder speaks with Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal about his most recent piece at the Washington Post's Wonkblog, where he argued that Lehman shouldn't be the center of the financial crisis narrative.

Finally, JPMorgan Admits The Bank Broke The Law (HuffPo)

Mark Gongloff reports on JPMorgan's admission that they broke securities laws in the "London Whale" debacle. The fine is an inconsequential amount for the firm, as it often is in these cases, but it's unusual for banks and bankers to actually admit to their wrongdoing.

The Fed Has Investors Overjoyed, And It's For All the Wrong Reasons (The Atlantic)

Mohamed El-Erian sees this week's surprise announcement of no taper from the Fed as symptomatic of their failure to plan long-term strategy. That's a big problem, since the Fed's uncertainty leads to market instability.

The Fed Stays the Course (TAP)

Robert Kuttner is glad that the Fed will maintain bond buying programs for now, but it's a decision that primarily benefits Wall Street. Hopefully, a Yellen-chaired Fed would reconsider a plan to purchase bonds that put money in the Main Street economy.

Job And Business Growth Strong Under Seattle’s Paid Sick Days Law (ThinkProgress)

Bryce Covert looks at an analysis of the impact of a new paid sick leave law on the Seattle economy. Seattle continues its economic growth, just as has been the case in every other municipality that has enacted paid sick leave legislation.

Rousing Workers to Seek Higher Wages (LA Times)

Alana Semuels speaks with Naquasia LeGrand, a KFC employee who has been heavily involved in Fast Food Forward in NYC. Naquasia was anti-union at first, but after learning more about the movement, she's become a strong supporter and recruiter.

Women Waiting Tables Provide Most of Female Gains in U.S. (Bloomberg)

Ian Katz and Alex Tanzi report on a study by the National Women's Law Center that looks at women's employment gains. Most of the increases in employment for women since 2009 are in the service industry, with 60 percent of new jobs paying less than $10.10 an hour.

Red State Pain (NYT)

Timothy Egan considers the GOP's continued inability to empathize with poor constituents as the House passes a bill that will kick 3.8 million people off SNAP. The underlying assumption is that the poor, even children, have done something to deserve going hungry.

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Daily Digest - September 16: Exceptionally Poor Social Safety Nets

Sep 16, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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SNAP Proposal Would Deny Benefits to Millions (Melissa Harris-Perry)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren pointed out the disappointing side of American exceptionalism: the most children in poverty of any wealthy democracy. Cutting SNAP benefits means more of those children go hungry.

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SNAP Proposal Would Deny Benefits to Millions (Melissa Harris-Perry)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren pointed out the disappointing side of American exceptionalism: the most children in poverty of any wealthy democracy. Cutting SNAP benefits means more of those children go hungry.

What We Get Wrong When We Talk About ‘The Financial Crisis’ (WaPo)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal says that the narrative of the financial crisis shouldn't center on the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy. We can't forget the mortgage crisis, and ordinary Americans' distrust in financial systems is still a concern.

Summers Over (Reuters)

Felix Salmon suggests that the trial balloon raised for Larry Summers in July caused the politicization of the nomination for Fed Chair, and ultimately Summers's withdrawal. Sadly, his hopes that the position can remain technocratic instead of political seem unlikely.

Give Jobs a Chance (NYT)

Paul Krugman asks the Fed to put off the taper a little longer. With labor force participation so low, and unemployment still too high, he doesn't want to risk rocking our already unsteady recovery any more than necessary.

Could You Live on $11,940 a Year? (TAP)

Paul Waldman examines the decreasing value of the minimum wage. He supports a bill that would index the minimum wage to inflation, so workers would no longer have to wait on Congress to do something about the decreasing real value of their pay.

Why a Foreign Car Maker Might Be About to Say Yes to a U.S. Union (The Atlantic)

Jordan Weissmann explains how the United Auto Workers may finally get a hold in a foreign company's car plant on U.S. soil. Half the battle, he says, is PR, since there's an assumption that unionization would cause foreign manufacturers to pull out of the U.S.

How Detroit Went Broke: The Answers May Surprise You - and Don't Blame Coleman Young (Detroit Free Press)

Nathan Bomey and John Gallagher examine the financial history of Detroit back to the 1950s, and find that there were plenty of opportunities to prevent today's bankruptcy. Their in-depth analysis shows that Detroit may want to reconsider which mayors it blames or praises.

 

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Three Graphs That Show Why Inequality Matters in the New York City Mayoral Race

Sep 11, 2013Nell Abernathy

The New York City primary results show that the issue of rising inequality is striking a chord with voters. Here's why.

The results are in and two (or three) candidates are one step closer to Gracie Mansion. What we know for certain is that along with winning international attention and prime seats at Yankee Stadium, New York’s next mayor will inherit a city that is more unequal in terms of income than any other major city in America.

The increasing polarization of wealth in New York has been a hot topic and served as the campaign centerpiece for one of yesterday’s big winners, Bill de Blasio. We are trying to resist pointing out that experts like our own Jeff Madrick were talking about this problem even before the drum circles of Zuccotti Park, but we’re happy that the city’s Sierra Leone-like inequality is at last making headlines.

Because we know that we can do better, and we hope our next mayor will at least try, the Roosevelt Institute’s Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative is taking a look back at some of the most compelling charts and graphs to surface on the long road to Election Day.

From James Parrott, at the Fiscal Policy Institute, who will be a panelist at our upcoming forum on inequality:

The top 1 percent are capturing a growing portion of the nation’s economy, and nowhere is that trend more pronounced than in New York.

The top 1 percent, in fact, pay less than their fair share of the tax burden:

Meanwhile, the poverty rate in New York City continues to rise: 

We will be back tomorrow with more infographics. To learn more about potential solutions to our growing wealth gap, join us for our panel discussion on Tuesday, September 24:

Inequality in New York: The Next Mayor’s Challenge

September 24, 2013

6:00 p.m. cocktail reception

6:30 – 8:00 p.m. panel discussion

Roosevelt House, Public Policy Institute at Hunter College

49 East 65th Street

New York, NY 10065

Nell Abernathy is the Program Manager for the Roosevelt Institute's Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative.

The New York City primary results show that the issue of rising inequality is striking a chord with voters. Here's why.

The results are in and two (or three) candidates are one step closer to Gracie Mansion. What we know for certain is that along with winning international attention and prime seats at Yankee Stadium, New York’s next mayor will inherit a city that is more unequal in terms of income than any other major city in America.

The increasing polarization of wealth in New York has been a hot topic and served as the campaign centerpiece for one of yesterday’s big winners, Bill de Blasio. We are trying to resist pointing out that experts like our own Jeff Madrick were talking about this problem even before the drum circles of Zuccotti Park, but we’re happy that the city’s Sierra Leone-like inequality is at last making headlines.

Because we know that we can do better, and we hope our next mayor will at least try, the Roosevelt Institute’s Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative is taking a look back at some of the most compelling charts and graphs to surface on the long road to Election Day.

From James Parrott, at the Fiscal Policy Institute, who will be a panelist at our upcoming forum on inequality:

The top 1 percent are capturing a growing portion of the nation’s economy, and nowhere is that trend more pronounced than in New York.

The top 1 percent, in fact, pay less than their fair share of the tax burden:

Meanwhile, the poverty rate in New York City continues to rise: 

We will be back tomorrow with more infographics. To learn more about potential solutions to our growing wealth gap, join us for our panel discussion on Tuesday, September 24:

Inequality in New York: The Next Mayor’s Challenge



September 24, 2013



6:00 p.m. cocktail reception



6:30 – 8:00 p.m. panel discussion



Roosevelt House, Public Policy Institute at Hunter College



49 East 65th Street



New York, NY 10065

Nell Abernathy is the Program Manager for the Roosevelt Institute's Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative.

 

New York City skyline image via Shutterstock.com

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Policy Note: Will Crowdfunding Kickstart an Investment Revolution?

Sep 5, 2013

Download the policy note (PDF) by Georgia Levenson Keohane

In a new policy note, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Georgia Levenson Keohane examines the policy and political implications of peer-to-peer financing. In recent years, crowdfunding has emerged as a financing model that allows smaller funders to invest in projects and organizations in their early stages – particularly those that would otherwise struggle to obtain capital. Peer-to-peer funding experiments first emerged in the nonprofit sector, but have since expanded to the realms of for-profit investment and political activism.

Download the policy note (PDF) by Georgia Levenson Keohane

In a new policy note, Roosevelt Institute Fellow Georgia Levenson Keohane examines the policy and political implications of peer-to-peer financing. In recent years, crowdfunding has emerged as a financing model that allows smaller funders to invest in projects and organizations in their early stages – particularly those that would otherwise struggle to obtain capital. Peer-to-peer funding experiments first emerged in the nonprofit sector, but have since expanded to the realms of for-profit investment and political activism. The proliferation of crowdfunding models and uses requires a nuanced policy response, one that balances the imperative to support the growth of small businesses and new jobs with safeguards for investor protection.

Read the policy note: "Will Crowdfunding Kickstart an Investment Revolution?" by Roosevelt Institute Fellow Georgia Levenson Keohane.

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Daily Digest - August 21: How to Plan for the Future In Today's Economy

Aug 21, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Working Class Millennials Have Extra Challenges in Tough Economy (Daily Circuit)

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Working Class Millennials Have Extra Challenges in Tough Economy (Daily Circuit)

Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz talks about the precariousness of the American Dream in today's economy on Minnesota Public Radio. Many young people see the traditional markers of adulthood as unreachable with such an uncertain future.

The High Probability of Being Poor (TAP)

Matt Bruenig examines more detailed data that refutes some critiques of last month's AP report on economic insecurity. The aggregate life span poverty experience in this country is surprising, and in some demographics, poverty touches almost everyone.

Freelance Nation: When Good Jobs Turn to Bad (Salon)

Barbara Garson examines how jobs that used to provide a solid middle-class lifestyle have lost wages, benefits, and long-term security. Employers have turned many jobs into part-time or contract work, which takes away everything that made a job good.

Should White House Interns be Paid? (The Week)

Carmel Lobello speaks to organizers who are campaigning to get political interns in Washington wages. They see a disconnect between calling for a higher minimum wage and running the administration with unpaid workers.

North Carolina Could Be Next To Throw A Wrench Into Paid Sick Leave (Think Progress)

Bryce Covert reports on the preemption bills popping up across the country that prevent cities and counties from enacting local paid sick leave laws. ALEC, which pushes this bill, doesn't seem to care that paid sick leave saves employers the cost of lost productivity.

Women Shortchanged In Retirement Earnings (NPR)

Celeste Headlee and guests discuss how policy contributes to the gender gap in retirement funds. When women leave the workforce to have children, even temporarily, they reduce their personal contributions to retirement and have fewer work years to base Social Security on.

Why the White House is Uneasy with Picking Janet Yellen as Fed Chair (WaPo)

Neil Irwin sees Janet Yellen as an independent thinker who is methodically prepared in her work. That style and her emphasis on unemployment instead of financial bubbles may be what is keeping her off the top of the White House short list.

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Daily Digest - August 20: Everyone Loses These Policy Debates

Aug 20, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Breaking Out of a Cramped Economic Policy Debate (NYT)

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Breaking Out of a Cramped Economic Policy Debate (NYT)

Jared Bernstein questions the continued false choices presented by our partisan policy debates. These arguments can't be about who wins, because then our policy is focused on winners and losers instead of fairness, opportunity, and growth.

Stop Worrying about Food Stamp "Fraud" (TAP)

Matt Bruenig points out that when we give a family SNAP, we're giving them dollars to spend, not Monopoly money. The fraud in question involves swapping SNAP money for dollars, and he thinks we should accept that we were already giving them money.

Sequestration Cuts Head Start for 57,000 Children (MSNBC)

Suzy Khimm explains the extent of the cuts that Head Start has to make. They were advised not to "compromis[e] the quality of [their] services," but that's not easy when Head Start already ran on a bare-bones budget.

Fast-Food Workers Call for Nationwide Walkout Aug. 29 (WaPo)

Michael Fletcher reports on the planned next steps for fast food strikes around the country. Organizers expect the August 29th protests, which will continue to call for a living wage, to include at least 35 cities.

Why Jobs Go Unfilled Even in Times of High Unemployment (The Atlantic)

Amy Sullivan talks to René Bryce-Laporte of Skills for America's Future about the supposed skills gap, and community college partnerships that are trying to fill it. Of course, these programs have tuition that usually falls on the unemployed person, not the employers.

Obama to Meet with Regulators Over Stalled Dodd-Frank Reform Act (The Guardian)

Heidi Moore discusses the coming meeting of the financial stability oversight council, where they are expected to discuss Dodd-Frank. The big question is why so many rules are still unwritten after three years of work.

New on Next New Deal

Why Carried Interest Reform Should Be a No-Brainer

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network alumnae Lydia Austin thinks that it's time for the tax code to recognize that carried interest, the share of profits received by private equity fund managers, is income, and should be taxed accordingly.

Roosevelt Institute Event

How Chicago Attracts Millennials in a Tough Economy

Tonight, join Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz and local stakeholders for a discussion on how Chicago has made itself a "land of opportunity" for Millennials, and how we can make that opportunity accessible to all.

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