Daily Digest - December 4: Youth Unemployment Is Leading to Tragedy

Dec 4, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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"Tragedy as a generation" for U.S. Youth (Marketplace)

David Brancaccio speaks to Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick about the problems young people are facing in today's economy. He says that without professional lobbyists, other groups' needs are being heard over young people's.

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"Tragedy as a generation" for U.S. Youth (Marketplace)

David Brancaccio speaks to Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick about the problems young people are facing in today's economy. He says that without professional lobbyists, other groups' needs are being heard over young people's.

CFPB To Supervise Largest Student Loan Servicers (HuffPo)

Shahien Nasiripour reports that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has finalized a rule giving it oversight over the companies that collect payments on federal student loans. This should hopefully ensure more borrower-friendly practices.

Detroit Is Bankrupt: What Now? (Pacific Standard)

Anna Clark lists the three most important things to be aware of now that the courts have approved Detroit's bankruptcy filing. She notes that this case will have a major impact on other cities, which look to Detroit as an example of the possibilities in their future.

Fighting Corruption Polls Off the Charts (MSNBC)

Zachary Roth reports on a new poll from represent.us which shows that the vast majority of Americans support tougher campaign finance laws. Unfortunately, incumbents seem uninterested in changing the rules that helped to get them elected.

  • Roosevelt Take: Jeff Raines, Chair of the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Student Board of Advisors, explains how a current Supreme Court case could further weaken campaign finance law.

Black Friday and the Race to the Bottom (The New Yorker)

George Packer ties low retail sales during the extended Black Friday weekend to the fights for a higher minimum wage. Executives should recognize the practical truth that workers need to be able to afford to shop too.

Tax Breaks for CEOs Pay for Million-Dollar Salaries (The Guardian)

Jana Kasperkevic explains the performance pay loophole that allows corporations to deduct millions in executive compensation from their federal income taxes. She draws a parallel between the results of that policy and the low wages of average fast food workers.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Director of Research Susan Holmberg and Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network alum Lydia Austin wrote a white paper calling on Congress to close the performance pay loophole. Read it here.

Low Bank Wages Costing the Public Millions, Report Says (WaPo)

Danielle Douglas writes that new data from the University of California at Berkeley's Labor Center shows that bank employees are relying heavily on public assistance, to the tune of $900 million a year. The banking industry reported $141.3 billion in profits last year.

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Daily Digest - December 3: Obamacare Doesn't Eliminate the Need for Title X

Dec 3, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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What's the Deal: Why Is Title X Important to the Success of the ACA? (Roosevelt Institute)

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What's the Deal: Why Is Title X Important to the Success of the ACA? (Roosevelt Institute)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn breaks down the connection between Title X family planning clinics and the Affordable Care Act. She says that fully funding Title X would greatly increase the successes of health care reform.

Doing Macro First (NYT)

Paul Krugman agrees with Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal's recent Wonkblog column where he suggested shifting the order of subjects in introductory economics courses. Putting macroeconomics first help students try to make sense of the current crisis.

The Exploited Laborers of the Liberal Media (Vice)

Charles Davis looks at the array of liberal publications that write about labor issues, including the internship economy, without paying their own interns. Some publications are finally changing that model, but only after public pressure.

The Solution to Unemployment Isn’t Better-Trained Workers: Or, Systemic Problems Have Systemic Solutions (An Und Für Sich)

Adam Kotsko points out that calls for better training won't do anything to solve the number of jobs available or the quality of those jobs. If worker education is expanded, as a Wal-Mart VP suggests in response to protests, Wal-Mart will just have a more educated staff.

Holiday Weekend Sales Dip on Discounts; E-commerce Jumps (Reuters)

Phil Wahba reports that while even more people went shopping over the holiday weekend, total sales were still down. Steep discounts may have drawn in shoppers, but they didn't help the stores' profit margins.

NY State Regulator Subpoenas 16 Websites for Ties to Payday Lenders (WSJ)

Shayndi Rice explains that the state's Department of Financial Services suspects these websites are selling personal information to payday lenders that charge illegally high rates. Some of these predatory lenders charge annual interest rates over 600 percent.

Fast-Food Workers In 100 Cities To Walk Off The Job (HuffPo)

Candice Choi and Sam Hananel report on the upcoming protest, which will happen on Thursday. Demonstrations are planned in another hundred cities in addition to the strikes, making this the largest protest yet in fast food workers' call for higher wages.

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Why Is Title X Important to the Success of the ACA?

Dec 2, 2013

As part of the Roosevelt Institute's "What's the Deal?" series, Fellow Andrea Flynn explains the importance of Title X in relation to the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA).

As part of the Roosevelt Institute's "What's the Deal?" series, Fellow Andrea Flynn explains the importance of Title X in relation to the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA).

Read Andrea's paper here.

Have an idea or topic suggestion for our "What's the Deal" series? Let us know by tweeting at #RIExplains and @RooseveltInst.

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Daily Digest - December 2: Pushing Back on Low Wage Norms

Dec 2, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Will Low-Wage Jobs be the Norm? (Melissa Harris Perry)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren discusses low-wage work following Black Friday protests at Walmart and other retailers. As low-wage work grows, he says American social mobility has fallen to its lowest point in decades.

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Will Low-Wage Jobs be the Norm? (Melissa Harris Perry)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren discusses low-wage work following Black Friday protests at Walmart and other retailers. As low-wage work grows, he says American social mobility has fallen to its lowest point in decades.

The Spyware That Enables Mobile-Phone Snooping (Bloomberg View)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford explains how mobile phone companies' refusal to upgrade infrastructure leaves openings for private espionage. But since law enforcement uses these same weaknesses in the network, no one is rushing to solve this problem.

Colleges are Teaching Economics Backwards (WaPo)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that the perfect models of microeconomics give students in introductory economics courses the impression that markets should work. Why not start with the macroeconomic problems that affect them?

We’re Not Broke — We’ve Been Robbed (Other Words)

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch points out just how important it is to remember that the government is not a household, and in fact should spend beyond its means during recessions. More budget cuts will just make our children's futures worse.

Forget “Double Down.” Here’s the Real Story of the 2012 Election (Salon)

Elias Isquith suggests that the data-driven analysis the 2012 election presented in a recent Roosevelt Institute working paper provides the most exciting take on the story. The surveillance state's support of the Obama campaign is the real surprise.

  • Roosevelt Take: Read "Party Competition and Industrial Structure in the 2012 Elections" by Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Thomas Ferguson, Paul Jorgensen, and Jie Chen here.

Activists Are Arrested Protesting Walmart’s Low Wages (The Nation)

Alison Kilkenny reports on Black Friday protests at Walmart, where workers and activists called for higher wages. For some, there was real risk in this protest: according to a charge from the National Labor Relations Board, Walmart has threatened and punished striking workers before.

A New Day, A New Danger: Temporary Workers Face Safety Hazards at Work (In These Times)

Michelle Chen writes about the particular challenges faced by temporary workers who may not even know what work they will do on a given day, let alone what safety precautions they should take. Meanwhile, no one seems to be accountable for their safety.

New on Next New Deal

Two Simple Reasons to Not Fight Bubbles With Higher Interest Rates

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues against raising interest rates to fight financial instability. Using one instrument for two targets is a bad idea, and it isn't clear that higher interest rates would actually work against instability.

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Abortion Restrictions Are Harming Women's Health and Human Rights in Texas

Nov 25, 2013Andrea Flynn

Abortion restrictions in Texas are hurting low-income women in the Rio Grande Valley, which is proof positive that the U.S. needs to think about human rights locally, not just internationally.

Abortion restrictions in Texas are hurting low-income women in the Rio Grande Valley, which is proof positive that the U.S. needs to think about human rights locally, not just internationally.

Last week the Supreme Court decided to leave in place a Texas law that has essentially closed a third of the abortion providers in that state. On their own, the abortion restrictions are devastating. But in the context of three long years’ worth of family planning and women’s health cuts that violate the human rights of women in that state, they are catastrophic.

Over the summer Wendy Davis launched Texas into the national spotlight when she filibustered the same sweeping anti-abortion laws that were upheld by the Supreme Court. But long before that, women’s health advocates were sounding the alarm bells about the impact of massive family planning cuts that dismantled the state’s health infrastructure, on which millions of low-income women relied.

In order to understand the full implications of this week’s ruling, one must consider the current state of women’s health care – particularly that of low-income women – in Texas. The Center for Reproductive Rights (CRR) and the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health (NLIRH) recently released a must-read report that illustrates the devastating human toll of family planning and reproductive health cuts on women living in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley.

The Valley is a marginalized region inside a state with some of the worst health disparities and the highest percentage of uninsured adults in the country. Many women in the Valley live in colonias, unincorporated communities along the U.S.-Mexico border, which often lack clean water, plumbing, electricity, and public transportation.

The report profiles women whose health and lives have changed along with the landscape of health infrastructures and systems in their communities. Women who detected lumps in their breasts four years ago but cannot afford the mammogram to determine if they are cancerous. Women who have received mammograms months ago but cannot get results because of exorbitant doctor’s fees. Women with ovarian cysts and cervical pain who risk their lives swimming across the river and traveling through towns rife with violence to access care in Mexico.

These women – and the thousands more they represent – must decide between paying rent, giving their children food and a roof over their heads, or having a mammogram, a Pap test, or contraceptives. “It’s one or the other, but not both,” they say. They live with a constant din of anxiety and fear, not knowing what disease is or might be growing in their bodies, where they will get care in emergency situations, or what will happen to their children if they become sick (or worse).

These women are living the consequences of calculated decisions made by conservative lawmakers to dismantle the state’s health safety net. Over the last two years, they cut the state’s family planning budget by two-thirds, from $111 million to $37.9 million. They established a tiered system and forfeited $30 million in federal funds so they could exclude Planned Parenthood and other organizations affiliated with abortion providers from receiving state or federal resources.

The 2011 policies shuttered 76 family planning clinics across the state (including 9 out of the Valley’s 32) and caused 55 more to reduce hours. Publicly funded clinics served 77 percent fewer patients in 2013 compared to 2011 (202,968 and 47,322, respectively). In the Valley public clinics went from serving 19,595 in 2011 to 5,470 in 2013. These trends are particularly troubling when you consider that even before the cuts, publicly funded family planning programs were providing care to less than 20 percent of the population in need.

As the CRR/NLIRH report describes, women in the Valley – particularly Latina women – experience the grave consequences of living at the intersections of race, class, gender, and immigration in the United States. They are 31 percent more likely to die of cervical cancer than women in non-border communities. In the rest of the country, rates of cervical cancer have been plummeting thanks to early detection and treatment, but among Latinas in the Valley the rate is increasing and cervical cancer deaths among Latinas is nearly twice that of non-Latina white women.

The report exposes the lesser-known consequences of the cuts and regulations on clinics that are still open. Remaining providers have reduced hours, laid off staff, increased fees, and stopped providing the most effective family planning methods all while managing a rapidly growing demand for their services. The average cost of a one-month supply of contraception and the fee for an annual exam has increased three- to four-fold since 2010. Ultrasounds and mammograms, once accessible thanks to subsidized rates, are no longer in reach of most women. Wait times often exceed several months.

For women living in areas where clinics have closed, reaching neighboring providers is often impossible due to transportation barriers. Buses are nonexistent, infrequent, or unreliable. Gas is too expensive. Childcare is hard to find. Taking time off work is not an option. For undocumented immigrants, traveling to other communities requires passing through internal checkpoints and risking deportation.

So what happens? Women purchase unregulated contraceptives off the black market, without consulting a doctor about which form of family planning is best for their bodies. They seek care in Mexico, taking the risk that they will not make it back across the border safely. Or, like many of the women described in the report, they forgo contraception and medical care because they simply cannot afford it.

This is the background upon which the most recent abortion restrictions have occurred. There is not a single abortion provider left in the Valley. At a minimum, women must travel three to five hours each way to access an abortion (and must make that trip multiple times thanks to ultrasound and counseling requirements). For most women, it might as well be outlawed.

Many of the women in the Valley do not reap the benefits of federal programs and policies meant to support low-income women. Undocumented immigrants are not eligible for public insurance programs. New immigrants must wait five years before becoming eligible for Medicaid. Texas is not expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, leaving those who aren’t poor enough for Medicaid but are too poor to qualify for subsidies out of luck.

Title X, the nation’s only program dedicated to family planning – which once provided effective and far reaching family planning care for the state’s low-income women – was seriously weakened by the above-mentioned regulations. (Luckily, the Obama administration recently took Title X out of the hands of the state government and endowed it to the Women’s Health and Family Planning Association of Texas, which has directed funding back to family planning clinics and even enabled a previously closed facility in the Valley to reopen.)

As the CRR/NLIRH report argues, the state of Texas has done more than just grievously neglect an underserved and marginalized community of women. It has violated the human rights of women in Texas, a duty it is legally obligated to respect, protect, and fulfill. American exceptionalism has relegated human rights to the international development sphere and deemed them unnecessary within our own borders. But for the health and lives of women in Texas and around the country, it is time we think about how we can use human rights to make America exceptional in ways we can be proud of. 

Andrea Flynn is a Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute. She researches and writes about access to reproductive health care in the United States. You can follow her on Twitter @dreaflynn.

Photo via Shutterstock.

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Daily Digest - November 21: Lobbyists Without Big Money

Nov 21, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Witnesses to Hunger (and Poverty) on the Hill (The Nation)

Greg Kaufmann reports on an unusual group of lobbyists on Capitol Hill: five "Witnesses to Hunger" who currently receive food stamps, who advocated for maintaining SNAP funding. Their goal was to give a face to social safety net programs.

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Witnesses to Hunger (and Poverty) on the Hill (The Nation)

Greg Kaufmann reports on an unusual group of lobbyists on Capitol Hill: five "Witnesses to Hunger" who currently receive food stamps, who advocated for maintaining SNAP funding. Their goal was to give a face to social safety net programs.

Obama’s Mystery Man for Derivatives (ProPublica)

Jesse Eisinger profiles Timothy Massad, the relatively unknown nominee for Commodity Futures Trading Commission chair. He questions if Massad may be too friendly to banking interests for this particular regulatory role.

What would the Fed do if the US defaulted on its debt? (Quartz)

Tim Fernholz says that it appears the Fed has limited tools that it could use in the event of a default, which could be a concern again in March. What few tools might be usable are so politically tenuous that just not hitting the debt ceiling would be greatly preferred.

Federal Reserve weighs slowing bond buys soon (Marketwatch

Steve Goldstein says that according to minutes released from the Fed's October 30 meeting, quantitative easing is probably coming to a close soon. But that consensus doesn't mean the Fed has decided how to end the program.

Wal-Mart's No Good, Very Bad, Pre-Thanksgiving Week (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Susan Berfield reports on Wal-Mart's difficult news week. Between the food drive for their own employees and the new report from Demos explaining how they could pay more without increasing prices, Wal-Mart is probably looking forward to the holiday.

Detroit accused of exaggerating $18bn debts in push for bankruptcy (The Guardian)

Dominic Rushe looks at a new report from Demos that questions the way Detroit's debt was calculated for bankruptcy. The report suggests that cutting pensions would work against the city's long-term needs.

New on Next New Deal

How Can We Help America's Opportunity Youth? Five Lessons Learned in New Orleans

Following up on an event in New Orleans this summer, Nell Abernathy, Program Manager for the Roosevelt Institute's Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative, considers the steps that will be needed to help youth who are neither in school nor working.

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Daily Digest - November 19: Cheers For Enforcing Labor Laws

Nov 19, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Wal-Mart Faces Warehouse Horror Allegations and Federal Labor Board Complaint (Salon)

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Wal-Mart Faces Warehouse Horror Allegations and Federal Labor Board Complaint (Salon)

Josh Eidelson reports on Wal-Mart's no-good, very bad day in labor news. Between allegations of worker safety concerns in California and a National Labor Relations Board complaint about strike retaliation, Wal-Mart started the week with a bang.

Reality Check: Obamacare is Not to Blame for Wal-Mart's Sluggish Sales (The Guardian)

Heidi Moore thinks it's ridiculous when big retailers try to use the Affordable Care Act as a scapegoat for their disappointing financial performance. Even if every person who enrolled in the ACA stopped shopping at Wal-Mart, it wouldn't cause this drop in sales.

Elizabeth Warren to Congress: Grandma "Will Be Left to Starve" If We Cut Social Security (MoJo)

Erica Eichelberger discusses Senator Warren's speech on the Senate floor yesterday, in which she decried the very idea of cutting Social Security benefits. The Senator insisted that balancing the budget couldn't come at the expense of seniors.

American Inequality in Six Charts (The New Yorker)

John Cassidy looks at charts shared by presenters at the launch of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth last week. He's particularly interested in the questions these charts raise about the relationship between inequality and growth.

There is Not Enough Affordable Rental Housing (MetroTrends Blog)

Erika Poethig explains how programs for affordable housing haven't kept up with the expanding need. She suggests that policy changes like raising the minimum wage will help, but more proactive policy will make a much bigger difference.

Democrats Push For Extending A Lifeline For The Long-Term Unemployed (ThinkProgress)

Bryce Covert reports on the push for extended unemployment benefits. The federal program, which helps support people who have been out of work for more than six months, will otherwise disappear at the end of the year.

New on Next New Deal

Courageous Boeing Workers Say No to Corporate Extortion

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch applauds the Machinists Local 751, which voted down a contract despite the risk of lost work. The union saw this contract as an offense to past workers - and a destruction of middle class opportunity for future workers.

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President's Insurance Announcement Keeps Eyes on the Prize

Nov 14, 2013Richard Kirsch

By allowing people to keep their current plans for another year, even if those plans are not compliant with the Affordable Care Act, the President has retained a focus on the most important thing: insuring more Americans.

By allowing people to keep their current plans for another year, even if those plans are not compliant with the Affordable Care Act, the President has retained a focus on the most important thing: insuring more Americans.

President Obama’s move today to allow people to keep their current insurance plans for a year, as long as they are told that they may be able to get better coverage at a lower cost from the new exchanges, is smart politics with little likely policy damage. It keeps the eye on the prize: getting people enrolled. That is exactly why Republicans are likely to balk.

For years the GOP has been throwing bombs at the Affordable Care Act (ACA) based on groundless talking points (a government takeover) or pure lies (death panels). I have always had confidence that as the law was actually implemented, and those charges demonstrated to be just hot air, that they would lose any punch beyond the hard-right base. My worries have always been about those who would see themselves as being hurt  (mostly by having to pay more than they can afford for coverage) when the law began to be implemented. Those are real people with real stories. The “if you like it you can keep it” firestorm is the first explosion of that fear.

While the fact is that most people in the individual market will do better under the ACA’s new exchanges – once they are able to get into the enrollment system and apply for subsidies – there will be some people, mostly young, healthy, with good incomes, who would prefer to keep the coverage they have. And, as I wrote last week, since bad news is both more prevalent and more powerful than good news, their stories could threaten to define the law. By discrediting the ACA, it could also suppress enrollment, particularly given the botched rollout of Healthcare.gov.

Democrats on the Hill are a panicky lot, driven to over-react to many issues that Americans outside of the Beltway ignore. But in this case, they were right to be concerned about not responding to what people most fear about health reform, that change will threaten what they now have. It was the power of that fear which led to the “if you like it you can keep it” promise in the first place.

While the President’s credibility has sunk, he will not be on the ballot in 2014, but Democrats in Congress will. One of those Democrats, Senator Mary Landrieu of Louisiana, hit on a solution quickly. Landrieu has always been a consistent supporter of health reform and, despite representing a Red state, was never someone we were very concerned about losing in the legislative fight over the ACA. She deeply believes that people in her state should have health coverage. She stepped up last week with a bill that would allow people who are already covered to keep their insurance, but requires their insurance companies to tell them what ACA guaranteed benefits they won’t get with their current coverage and how to apply for coverage in the exchanges. Her proposal will make up for the misleading cancellation announcements sent out by insurance companies, which often have not told their policy holders that better, subsidized coverage might be available.

Today Obama implemented Sen. Landrieu’s proposal with one major change: his rule would only extend the coverage until the end of 2014, consistent with other delays in implementation, such as the employer mandate. His goal is to get over this current hurdle and then continue to move as many people into the exchanges as possible.

The President’s new rule is likely to be where the policy settles, but it is not likely to end the Congressional debate. The Republicans will seek to keep the issue alive by voting to approve a bill sponsored by House Energy and Commerce Chair Fred Upton, which would not just grandfather existing policies – the President’s promise – but open them up to more people. And that bill would leave out the information about the better, more affordable exchange policies in the Landrieu legislation and Obama rule.

Democrats may decide they need to offer a legislative alternative to the Upton bill, which could be the Landrieu proposal. The policy concern with the Landrieu proposal is that premiums will rise and the exchanges will be harmed, if the healthiest people stay out, which is why Obama wants to limit the extension to one year. While that is certainly better policy, if Democrats go the Landrieu route it won’t be cataclysmic. Fairly quickly, the number of people left with their original policies will shrink as they get older and sicker and their insurance premiums rise. And as the exchanges grow and policies outside the exchanges dwindle, more insurers will drop coverage outside the exchanges all together.

Will Republicans accept this compromise? Of course not. Everything they’ve done for the last five years demonstrates that they would rather try to keep the issue alive politically than address people’s problems.

The President’s move allows him and Democrats to take the high ground. The most important task – to build a solid political foundation for the Affordable Care Act and realize its purpose – is getting people more people enrolled. The experience in Massachusetts demonstrated that low initial enrollment numbers are to be expected. There is every reason to expect a huge acceleration in enrollment as the web problems get fixed and we get closer to the deadlines. Including Medicaid, there are already more than half a million Americans who will be newly-covered next year. There will be millions more by early in 2014.  And as the opponents of Obamacare and government as a positive force in people’s lives know and fear, in the end, those are the people who will count.  

Richard Kirsch is a Senior Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, a Senior Adviser to USAction, and the author of Fighting for Our Health. He was National Campaign Manager of Health Care for America Now during the legislative battle to pass reform.

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Daily Digest - November 14: Millennial Success Beyond Big Cities

Nov 14, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Jersey City: Cheaper, Yes, But Also a Real Sense of Community (The Atlantic Cities)

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Jersey City: Cheaper, Yes, But Also a Real Sense of Community (The Atlantic Cities)

Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz continues her two week series on cities where Millennials can afford to succeed. She emphasizes that Jersey City, NJ isn't just a suburb anymore, with more people centering their work there too.

Elizabeth Warren to Regulators, Congress: End ‘Too Big to Fail’ (The Nation)

Zoë Carpenter discusses Senator Warren's keynote at a Roosevelt Institute and Americans for Financial Reform event this week. She focuses on how the Senator's speech fits into the larger picture of Congressional action on financial reform.

  • Roosevelt Take: Watch Senator Warren's speech, which aired live on C-SPAN 2, here.

How McDonald's and Wal-Mart Became Welfare Queens (Bloomberg View)

Barry Ritholtz takes a strong stance against the major corporations which work on a model of unsustainable wages for workers, who then need public assistance. Raising the minimum wage is a likely solution, but he also suggests penalties for companies whose workers can't get by.

Scalia’s Chance to Smash Unions: The Huge Under-the-Radar Case (Salon)

Josh Eidelson explains why Unite Here Local 355 v. Mulhall could make forming a union even more difficult. Most union organizing today is done under "card check neutrality agreements" between unions and companies, but those agreements could be ruled unconstitutional.

Detroit's Decision to Fend Off Bankruptcy: Pay Pensions or Banks? (The Guardian)

Dominic Rushe speaks to Detroit pension recipients about what bankruptcy would mean for their lives. They place the destruction of pensions squarely within the destruction of middle-class opportunity in the United States.

Everyone's Talking About This Simple Solution To Ending Poverty By Just Giving People Free Money (Business Insider)

Danny Vinik lays out a simple explanation of universal basic income. Importantly, he explains how the U.S. could fund a basic income up to the poverty line, even though it would never pass the current Congress.

How To Save Entitlements Without Really Trying (Blog of the Century)

Zachary Bernstein explains a potential change to Federal Insurance Contributions Act, which creates the taxes that fund Social Security and Medicare, that even the GOP could appreciate. We could save the long-term future of these programs and lower taxes for most Americans.

New on Next New Deal

The Real Movers and Shakers

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Senior Fellow for Equal Justice Erik Lampmann would be happier if elections and one-off protests got far less media attention. Instead, he suggests examples of community organizing successes that really deserve our applause.

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Daily Digest - November 12: Populism On The Rise

Nov 12, 2013Rachel Goldfarb

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Hillary's Nightmare? A Democratic Party That Realizes Its Soul Lies With Elizabeth Warren (TNR)

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Hillary's Nightmare? A Democratic Party That Realizes Its Soul Lies With Elizabeth Warren (TNR)

Noam Scheiber explains why Senator Warren is at the heart of the debate about the Democrats' identity. The argument between populists and Wall Street allies could be the central question in the Democratic primaries for 2016.

  • Roosevelt Take: Senator Warren will give the keynote address at "An Unfinished Mission: Making Wall Street Work For Us," where the Roosevelt Institute and Americans for Financial Reform will launch a new report on the policy questions that remain within and beyond Dodd-Frank.

House Dems Can Block GOP Food Stamp Cuts—By Killing the Farm Bill (MoJo)

Erika Eichelberger suggests that the best way for Democrats to stop cuts to food stamps would be to vote with the far right. If the farm bill fails, funding should continue at the same level, which makes voting with those who want even more cuts the way to go.

Could There be a Bipartisan Truce on Infrastructure? (MSNBC)

Suzy Khimm suggests that infrastructure could be one of the only issues in the budget negotiations that already has bipartisan support. The president's $50 billion infrastructure plan seems unlikely, but smaller projects have already passed even as the GOP yells about spending.

How Badly Has the U.S. Economy Been Damaged? (The New Yorker)

John Cassidy looks at a research paper by three economists at the Federal Reserve, which suggests that the recession has harmed the economy's capacity for growth. High unemployment and reduced capital investment may have cost up to seven percent of GDP.

“If You Like Your Current Health Insurance, You Can Keep It”: DeLong Analytical Failure Weblogging, Chapter CCXI (The Equitablog)

Brad DeLong looks at the reasons that some people are losing their current insurance under the Affordable Care Act. Of his four reasons, three are goals of reform, so it seems strange that those reasons are getting so much negative attention.

New on Next New Deal

Story Wars: Why Personal Stories Are Shaping the Health Care Battleground

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch argues that media bias means only certain (mostly negative) stories about the Affordable Care Act are getting serious attention. Supporters of the law need to ensure that the positive stories get covered, too.

"The Kids Aren't Alright": Millennials Demand Economic Stability for all LBGTQ People, Now

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Senior Fellow for Equal Justice Erik Lampmann says that Millennials can't understand why the GOP opposes the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, but that doesn't mean they have to accept a flawed version of the bill.

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