Daily Digest - February 4: A Vision for the Opportunity Community

Feb 4, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Students Rethink How to Build Community (The Nation)

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Students Rethink How to Build Community (The Nation)

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Senior Fellow for Equal Justice Erik Lampmann explains how the Campus Network's new Rethinking Communities initiative, which is evaluating institutions like universities on their local impact, could build a more equitable economy for the future.

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Associate Director of Networked Initiatives Alan Smith writes about the theory behind Rethinking Communities' focus on local economies.

Would the U.S. Postal Service Make a Better Banker for the Poor? (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Joshua Brustein takes up the question of postal banking as a method for the unbanked poor to avoid exploitative payday lenders and their ilk. He sees a future in which banks become worse at retail banking, which makes postal banking a solid possible alternative.

Banks Don’t Do Much Banking Anymore—and That’s a Serious Problem (Pacific Standard)

David Dayen writes about how "shadow banks," which include hedge funds, private equity firms, and the like, have taken a primary role in the lending industry as banks do less and less traditional banking. That's a big concern, because shadow banks are far less regulated and expand risk in the entire financial system.

State Could Be First In The Nation To Make Sure Workers Can Take A Vacation (ThinkProgress)

Bryce Covert reports that Washington lawmakers have proposed a bill that would mandate paid vacation for workers who put in at least 20 hours a week at employers with 25 or more employees. There's nothing like this anywhere else in the U.S.

Placed on Unpaid Leave, a Pregnant Employee Finds Hope in a New Law (NYT)

Rachel L. Swarns reports on one of the first cases invoking New York City's new Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. The law is meant to protect workers like Floralba Fernandez Espinal, who was placed on unpaid leave from her retail job when she brought a note from her obstetrician requesting accommodations.

New on Next New Deal

Obama and the GOP Present Two Very Different Paths to Opportunity for All

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch contrasts the messages presented by the president in the State of the Union with Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers’s official GOP response. Both focus on opportunity, but only one emphasizes the need for collective action.

Internet for the Public Interest Needs Protection

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network member Areeba Kamal calls on the Federal Communications Commission to redefine Internet Service Providers as common carriers in the wake of a court decision that struck down net neutrality regulations.

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Daily Digest - January 30: How Do We Make the Economy Work Again?

Jan 30, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Left Jab Radio (Sirius XM)

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Left Jab Radio (Sirius XM)

Jon Aberman and Mark Walsh speak with Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Jeff Madrick about technological innovation that doesn't lead to productivity increases, the jobs emergency, and how to make the U.S. economy more competitive.

Republicans Just Won the Food Stamp War (MoJo)

Erika Eichelberger writes that as the Senate plans to pass the current House version of the Farm Bill, which cuts $9 billion from SNAP, it's clear that the Democrats lost this fight. These cuts will mean that about a million families will receive $90 less per month.

Port Authority Demands Airlines Raise Worker Wages (NY Daily News)

Dan Friedman, Kenneth Lovett, and Rich Schapiro report that following a week-long campaign pushing for higher wages for airport workers, the executive director of the Port Authority has mandated a $9-per-hour wage for workers at LaGuardia and JFK airports.

Outsiders, Not Auto Plant, Battle U.A.W. in Tennessee (NYT)

Steven Greenhouse looks at the opposition to unionization efforts at the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. National groups like the Center for Worker Freedom are pouring vast amounts of money into this fight, even though some think Volkswagen is open to the union.

Fed Stays the Course on Stimulus Reduction (WaPo)

Ylan Q. Mui writes that the Federal Reserve will continue to scale back its bond-buying program by about $10 billion in February. She notes that this is despite some concerns about weak job growth, as the December jobs report showed the nation added only 74,000 jobs.

New on Next New Deal

Roosevelt Reacts: What Worked and What Didn't in the 2014 State of the Union

Roosevelt Institute Fellows and Network members respond to the State of the Union: what they liked, what was missing, and how the president should proceed from here.

State of the Union 2014: Obama Offers Action, Not Apologies

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Jeff Madrick praises the president for focusing on the changes that can be made rather than the year's mistakes. He's also glad to see Obama taking Congress to task for making progress impossible due to gridlock.

The State of the Union Then and Now: Raising the Minimum Wage is Still a Good Idea

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Hyde Park Resident Historian David Woolner notes that the president's call for a higher minimum wage mirrors President Franklin D. Roosevelt's 1938 State of the Union, which used similar arguments to call for the creation of the minimum wage.

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Republican Alternative to Obamacare: Pay More, Get Less, Put the Insurance Companies Back in Charge

Jan 28, 2014Richard Kirsch

Now that Republicans have put out an alternative to the Affordable Care Act, Democrats should emphasize what a repeal would really mean for Americans' health.

Now that Republicans have put out an alternative to the Affordable Care Act, Democrats should emphasize what a repeal would really mean for Americans' health.

Boy, can Democrats have fun with the new Republican alternative to Obamacare. It puts the health insurance companies back in charge and raises costs for almost all Americans. In particular, it substantially raises costs and threatens to cut coverage for the half of all Americans who get health insurance at work. Seniors, the group that Republicans have scared witless about Obamacare, would lose the real benefits they receive under Obamacare. The proposal from three Republican senators is a golden opportunity for Democrats to contrast the specific benefits of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) with what a repeal and replace agenda would really mean for Americans’ lives and health.

When it comes to the politics of health care reform, my first adage is “the solution is the problem.” That is because once you get past vague generalities, like lowering cost and making coverage available, to proposing specifics, people will look to see how the proposals impact them personally. This is why health reform is such a political nightmare. Unlike most public policy issues, the impact is very understandable and real.

With the ACA as the law of the land, in analyzing the Republican proposal we must compare its impact to the law it would repeal. The pre-ACA model of health insurance is irrelevant. Here is how the Republican plan would impact people, compared with the ACA:

People who get health insurance at workbottom line: pay more for worse coverage.

Almost half of all Americans (48 percent), or 148 million people, obtain health insurance at work. The Republican plan would tax 35 percent of the average cost of health insurance benefits at work. This is a big tax increase on working people and is extraordinarily unpopular, as the Obama campaign used to devastating impact on John McCain. And while people would pay more, they would get less coverage, as the GOP plan would allow insurance companies to once again limit the amount of benefits they will pay out in one year and return to the day when employers could offer bare-bones plans.

While taxing health benefits would apply to all employer-provided coverage, the Republicans would give the 30 percent of people who work for businesses who employ fewer than 100 workers a tax credit. That might balance out the increased taxes for some people. However, doing so would create a huge set of economic distortions, as employers might seek to keep firm size under the 100-employee threshold.

Individuals who buy coverage on their own or who are uninsured – bottom line: insurance companies could again deny coverage for pre-existing conditions and offer bare-bones coverage, while the cost of decent coverage would go up for most people.

This is the group that the ACA is most aimed at helping, including the 5 percent of Americans who buy private health insurance and the 15 percent who are uninsured, totaling 64 million people. The ACA offers income-based subsidies to these people when they earn between 100 percent and 400 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) and enrolls people under 133 percent of FPL in Medicaid, when states agree.

The Republican plan is toughest, in comparison with the ACA, on the lowest income people and on the higher-income middle-class, compared with Obamacare. But many families in between will do worse too.

The Republican plan would wipe out the expansion of Medicaid to people earning less than 133 percent of FPL, a provision the Supreme Court has made optional. It would cut back on Medicaid, ending the federal government’s offer to pay 90 percent of the cost of expanded coverage and replacing that with the federal government paying what it has paid historically, which is between half and three-quarters of the cost of Medicaid, with poorer states getting a bigger share. Crucially, the funding would only be for pregnant women, children and parents with dependent children who earn under the poverty level, as opposed to the ACAs funding of all adults up to 133% of FPL. That means many fewer people covered and states getting less Medicaid money. Republican governors may not complain, but you can bet hospitals will. Adults without dependent children would not be covered by federal Medicaid, which means millions will stay uninsured or lose coverage they now have, unless states pay for coverage without federal support.

For individuals not covered by Medicaid or employees of firms with fewer than 100 workers, the Republican plan would replace the ACA’s sliding-scale subsidies, which now go to 400 percent of FPL, with a subsidy that is the same for everyone of the same age who is under 200 percent of FPL and lowersubsidies for people from 200 percent to 300 percent. In addition, the subsidies would be higher for older people than younger. The Republican plan also would take away the requirements that insurance plans offer decent benefits and free preventive care and charge women the same prices as men for coverage, along with every other consumer protection, with the exception of keeping in place no lifetime caps for covered benefits.

Comparing the value of the Republican plan subsidies vs. the ACA subsidies for the people who would still qualify depends on income, age, and family size. Generally, it appears that the Republican subsidies are much less than the ACA for people under 150 percent of the FPL ($35,000 for a family of four) and much less than the ACA for younger people, but more for older people. However, insurance rates for younger people would go down some at the expense of older people, who insurance companies could charge a lot more than under ACA. And families with incomes above $70,000 for a family of four would lose subsidies entirely.

Seniors and the disabled on Medicare – bottom line: seniors would pay more for prescription drugs and preventive care.

By repealing the ACA, the Republican plan would take away its two concrete benefits for seniors. One is that preventive care services are now free under Medicare (as they are under all insurance). The other is that the ACA is lowering drug prices for seniors by slowly closing the “donut hole,” under which seniors must pay the full cost of prescription drugs even though they are paying premiums for drug coverage. In other words, the Republican plan is simply bad news for seniors, the constituency that they have scared the most about Obamacare groundlessly.

 

It is not surprising that Republicans have been reluctant to come up with a replacement for Obamacare. It’s much easier to throw darts – or bombs – at the ACA than to come up with a replacement that meets Republican ideological tenants of less regulation and less government. Any plan that meets the ideological test will be much worse for people in ways they can understand. It is our job to explain it to the public clearly: pay more, get less, put the insurance companies back in charge. This debate is not simply the political game Republicans want to make it. It is about our health and our lives. 

Richard Kirsch is a Senior Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, a Senior Adviser to USAction, and the author of Fighting for Our Health. He was National Campaign Manager of Health Care for America Now during the legislative battle to pass reform.

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Daily Digest - January 17: Less Aid Won't Lead to Less Inequality

Jan 17, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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People Worried About Income Inequality (The Kudlow Report)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal explains that while it's true that income inequality isn't quite as bad if you account for programs that provide low-wage income support, the GOP's plans to reduce that support and lower taxes will make the problem worse.

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People Worried About Income Inequality (The Kudlow Report)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal explains that while it's true that income inequality isn't quite as bad if you account for programs that provide low-wage income support, the GOP's plans to reduce that support and lower taxes will make the problem worse.

Advocates for Workers Raise the Ire of Business (NYT)

Steven Greenhouse writes about how businesses are reacting to the rise of worker centers as an alternative model for labor organizing. He quotes Greg Asbed from the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, who decries businesses' attacks on these centers as "McCarthy-era tactics."

  • Roosevelt Take: Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Richard Kirsch interviewed Greg Asbed and two of his fellow organizers prior to the 2013 Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Awards, where the Roosevelt Institute awarded the CIW the Freedom from Want Medal.

How Walmart Organizers Turned the Internet Into a Shop Floor (In These Times)

Sarah Jaffe looks at the innovative ways that OUR Walmart has used social media to organize discussions, build leaders, and support protests. She writes that these online spaces are valuable ways for organizers to reach workers and activists alike.

Mayor, Speaker Reach Deal on Paid Sick Leave (Capital New York)

Sally Goldenberg reports that New York City's top elected officials have reached an agreement to expand the city's paid sick leave law, which currently only applies to companies with at least 20 workers. Lowering that threshold will give more workers access to paid sick leave.

Obama Weighing Executive Action on Minimum Wage? (WaPo)

Greg Sargent writes that according to Senator Bernie Sanders, the White House is seriously considering raising the minimum wage for employees of federal contractors. Unlike raising the federal minimum wage, this could be accomplished with an executive order.

All the Jobs Growth Last Month Went to Women. (And That's Not Necessarily Good News for Them.) (TNR)

Emma Roller considers some of the problems with current job growth, which is primarily low-wage, going so heavily to women. She points to this "sinking floor" rather than the glass ceiling as the issue that is affecting most women in the workplace.

New on Next New Deal

Is Bridgegate Politics as Usual, or Beyond the Pale?

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Bo Cutter considers the Christie administration's actions in light of his years of experience in government. He says that because the lane closures on the George Washington Bridge affected normal people, this case is particularly terrible.

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Daily Digest - January 16: We (Almost) Have a Budget. What's Next?

Jan 16, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email.

Join Roosevelt Institute Associate Director of Networked Initiatives Alan Smith for a Twitter discussion this afternoon at 2pm EST to discuss the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network's new project examining how anchor institutions can promote local economic development. Follow the discussion at #RethinkingCommunities.

House Passes Compromise $1.1 Trillion Budget for 2014 (CNN)

Deirdre Walsh and Lisa Desjardins report on the omnibus spending bill that will now move to the Senate. Earlier this week, the President signed a three-day extension on the current continuing resolution, which gives the Senate until Saturday to pass the new budget.

Reid Vows to Try UI Again (The Hill)

Ramsey Cox writes that despite the Republicans blocking the vote on extended unemployment insurance this week, Senator Reid wants to try again after the Senate passes the budget. It's been nearly three weeks since 1.3 million people lost their long-term unemployment benefits.

Seeking Ways to Help the Poor and Childless (NYT)

Eduardo Porter looks at an experiment in earned income tax credit-style support for workers without children. The test considers whether the labor market is doing enough to support the needs of all workers, and what government can do to make up the difference.

Workers At Food Court Owned By Federal Government Allege They’ve Been Cheated Out Of $3 Million (ThinkProgress)

Alan Pyke reports that Good Jobs Nation has filed a complaint with the Department of Labor, alleging that service workers in Washington, DC's Union Station have been subject to chronic wage theft. The complaint claims losses averaging $10,000 per worker per year.

Push Set to Wrest Minimum-Wage Control From Albany (Crain's New York)

Chris Bragg writes that liberal groups are launching a campaign to allow municipalities in New York to pass higher local minimum wages. New York City politicians are supporting this proposal, but it's unclear how the state legislature feels about giving up control of the minimum wage.

Why Banks Aren’t Lending to Homebuyers (Reuters)

Felix Salmon explains the drop in mortgage availability as a simple matter of profits. At current rates, a 30-year fixed rate mortgage won't make much money for a bank, and the possible solutions aren't very good for potential homeowners.

Regions Bank To Discontinue Payday Loan Program (NPR)

Robert Benincasa reports that the Alabama-based bank is discontinuing its payday loan offerings, likely in response to increased regulations that don't apply to this bank. This shows that sometimes, even the threat of regulation will eliminate the worst banking practices.

New on Next New Deal

Move Over, Shareholders: Let Workers Have a Say in Corporate Governance

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network Senior Fellow for Economic Development Azi Hussain argues that we could change corporations so that they wouldn't have to put shareholder profits above all. A stakeholder corporate governance model would bring new priorities to the board room.

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Daily Digest - January 15: Nobel Winners Unite to Push for Higher Wages

Jan 15, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Seven Nobel Laureates Endorse Higher U.S. Minimum Wage (Bloomberg)

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Seven Nobel Laureates Endorse Higher U.S. Minimum Wage (Bloomberg)

Lorraine Woellert reports that the laureates are part of a group of 75 economists pushing for a minimum wage of $10.10 an hour by 2016, and for indexing the minimum wage to inflation. Roosevelt Institute Chief Economist Joseph Stiglitz is among the signatories of this letter.

Net Neutrality is Dead. Bow to Comcast and Verizon, Your Overlords (LA Times)

Michael Hiltzik explains yesterday's federal court decision, which struck down the FCC's net neutrality rules. He quotes Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford, who says big telecommunications companies aren't really competing, which makes regulation even more necessary.

Blue-Collar Wage-Grade Federal Workers Waiting on Pay Raise (WaPo)

Emily Wax-Thibodeaux writes about the federal employees who haven't gotten a 1 percent raise yet, despite President Obama's executive order ending a three-year pay freeze. Congress could finally enact that raise in the omnibus spending bill that's under consideration now.

Extension of Unemployment Benefits Dead in Senate For Now (CBS News)

Rebecca Kaplan explains how a fight over the rights of the minority party in the Senate subsumed the push to renew extended unemployment benefits. Senate Democrats are criticizing their Republican colleagues for putting politics ahead of the needs of the long-term unemployed.

Whose Side Are Progressives on: The Poor or the Upper Middle Class? (PolicyShop)

David Callahan points out that the coalition that elected President Obama twice and just elected Mayor de Blasio in New York City looks like a barbell: plenty of poor voters, and plenty of upper-middle class voters. But thus far, political priorities have greatly favored the wealthier part of this coalition.

Poverty Is Literally Making People Sick Because They Can't Afford Food (The Atlantic Cities)

Matthew O'Brien looks at a new study that determined that low-income patients who are living paycheck-to-paycheck experience an increase in health problems related to lack of food at the end of each month. The easiest solutions ensure that people have more money to buy food.

Democrats Concede to Curb Funds for Wall Street Regulators in Spending Bill (The Guardian)

Dan Roberts explains some of the bargains made for the sake of Congress's omnibus appropriations bill, expected to pass this week. Financial reform advocates are angered by the cuts to the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission budgets.

Regulators Ease Volcker Rule Provision on Smaller Banks (NYT)

Matthew Goldstein reports that regulators gave in to pressures from the banking industry and revised the Volcker Rule, supposedly to reduce its effects on smaller community banks. However, the revised rule will allow big banks to keep certain investments that could be seen as proprietary trading.

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Daily Digest - January 14: Big Money Isn't Beaten Yet

Jan 14, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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How Big Money Keeps Populism at Bay (AlterNet)

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How Big Money Keeps Populism at Bay (AlterNet)

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Thomas Ferguson writes with Paul Jorgensen and Jie Chen about how both parties' reliance on large donations from the wealthy to keep campaigns afloat limits the influence of populist movements on elections.

  • Roosevelt Take: Ferguson pulls from his working paper with Jorgensen and Chen to discuss political spending in the 2012 campaign.

'Mom did it, we can do it': Two-Generation Programs Help Lift Families Out of Poverty (NBC News)

Former Roosevelt Institute | Pipeline Fellow Nona Willis Aronowitz writes about a highly successful anti-poverty program in Amarillo, TX. The program works with single mothers and their children simultaneously to promote academic achievement.

How the Rise of Women in Labor Could Save the Movement (The Nation)

Bryce Covert draws on research from Roosevelt Institute Fellow Dorian Warren as she argues that encouraging the rise of female leadership in both traditional and alt-labor groups will help to reinvigorate the labor movement and lead it to success.

Two Roads Forward for Labor: The AFL-CIO’s New Agenda (Dissent)

Nelson Lichtenstein considers two paths for a revival of the labor movement, one based in singular events of mass upheaval, and the other in a slow drift to the left in American politics. These options aren't mutually exclusive, so he says labor should prepare for both.

Blaming Poverty on Single Parents Is Win-Win for Republicans, Evidence Be Damned (The Wire)

Philip Bump says that when Senator Marco Rubio tries to link marriage rates and poverty, progressives should remember that correlation is not causation. Sadly, the GOP would rather talk about marriage as a solution than fund real anti-poverty programs.

It Is Expensive to Be Poor (The Atlantic)

Barbara Ehrenreich discusses poverty as a shortage of money, as opposed to the moral failure that many politicians spin it to be. She argues that Americans need to stop blaming poverty on the poor and start fixing the economic and social institutions that perpetuate it.

Banks Seek to Limit Volcker With Challenge to Meaning of ‘Own’ (Bloomberg)

Yalman Onaran reports that bankers have filed a lawsuit arguing that the Volcker Rule's definition of ownership with regard to hedge funds and private-equity funds is too broad. The rule was written that way to keep banks from skirting the ban on proprietary trading.

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Daily Digest - January 13: Giving Welfare a Fair Shake

Jan 13, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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No, We Don’t Spend $1 Trillion on Welfare Each Year (WaPo)

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No, We Don’t Spend $1 Trillion on Welfare Each Year (WaPo)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal counters this common conservative talking point, along with the claim that welfare spending doesn't reduce poverty. Mike takes care to define which programs are really "welfare," and it turns out those programs are quite successful.

Internet In America: An On Again, Off Again Relationship (NPR)

Arun Roth speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford about the problems with high-speed internet access in the United States. She says that the U.S. is falling behind, and calls for a public infrastructure project to bring fiber optic access to all.

The 2013 Employment Story: Yet Another Year of McJob Growth (The Atlantic)

Jordan Weissmann writes that 2013 follows the trend set in 2011 and 2012 with 182,000 new jobs per month in the U.S., but those numbers say nothing about the kind of jobs being created, and he argues we're becoming accustomed to growth in low-wage fields.

Number of Americans Looking for Work at Lowest Level Since 1970s (The Guardian)

Dominic Rushe looks at the December jobs report from the Department of Labor and points out that the unemployment rate dropped to 6.7 percent primarily because of people giving up their search for work and dropping out of the labor force.

Doctors Slam Proposed Food Stamp Cuts: ‘The Dumbest Thing You Can Do Is Cut Nutrition’ (ThinkProgress)

Sy Mukherjee reports that the medical community is calling out lawmakers for their failure to see the connection between hunger and health. Saving money on SNAP won't matter if health care costs go up, and research shows those costs would disproportionately hit Medicaid.

New on Next New Deal

Lesson from December's Jobs Report: Turn On the Fiscal Jets

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow and Bernard L. Schwartz Rediscovering Government Initiative Director Jeff Madrick argues that the Federal Reserve must maintain monetary stimulus to preserve the recovery, but what's really needed is increased government spending.

In 2013, the Fed Showed Why Fiscal Policy is Still Important

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal argues that expanded monetary policy wasn't enough to offset fiscal austerity in 2013, even according to the benchmarks set by those who predicted the opposite, and that fiscal policy is still needed to keep the economy going.

In Contraceptive Mandate Challenges, Women’s Health and Much More is on the Line

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Andrea Flynn writes that the challenges to the contraceptive mandate in the Affordable Care Act lay the groundwork for private employers to deny their employees access to birth control, and potentially to other health services.

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Daily Digest - January 10: Unemployment Can't Be Solved With a Bus Ticket

Jan 10, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Marco Rubio to Jobless: Get Out Of Town (MoJo)

Erika Eichelberger speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal about Marco Rubio's plan to give unemployed people subsidies to move to low-unemployment areas. Mike says that this plan won't solve the problem of long-term unemployment.

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Marco Rubio to Jobless: Get Out Of Town (MoJo)

Erika Eichelberger speaks to Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal about Marco Rubio's plan to give unemployed people subsidies to move to low-unemployment areas. Mike says that this plan won't solve the problem of long-term unemployment.

The War Over Poverty (NYT)

Paul Krugman argues that the war on poverty should be seen as a template for success for the progressive movement. The narrative has shifted such that poverty is no longer seen as an example of moral deficiency, which makes anti-poverty programs more politically viable.

Why The Republican’s Old Divide-and-Conquer Strategy — Setting Working Class Against the Poor — Is Backfiring (Robert Reich)

Robert Reich argues that the Republicans, who continue to oppose policies that help the poor, such as food stamps and minimum wage increases, are running into problems because of the growth of the working poor, who need those programs to make ends meet.

Showdown vote ahead on Senate Democrats’ bill to extend jobless benefits (WaPo)

Paul Kane reports on the coming fight to pass Harry Reid's proposal for emergency unemployment insurance, which extends the program through November but cuts benefits to 31 weeks. Reid has shut down amendments to the bill, and an all-or-nothing vote will likely be held on Monday.

Universal Preschool Push Will Test Cuomo’s Commitment to New York Women (The Nation)

Bryce Covert uses the push for universal pre-K in New York to explain why it's impossible to split social and economic agendas. Pre-K isn't just an education issue; it's also about parents' ability to work, which makes this an economic issue that tax cuts can't solve.

Pinprick: Six Reasons Why Civil Fines Don't Deter Corporate Wrongdoers (PolicyShop)

David Callahan lists reasons that even massive fines like those JPMorgan Chase has been hit with don't eliminate illegal behaviors. The most important reason is that these fines don't cause any real damage to the individuals making the decisions for the corporation.

New on Next New Deal

Obama's 'Promise Zones' Have Potential if They Include Anchor Institutions

Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network National Field Strategist Joelle Gamble writes that the administration would do well to focus on anchor institutions, which the Roosevelt Institute's new Rethinking Communities initiative is doing, as it works to encourage local economic growth.

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Daily Digest - January 9: Celebrating the War on Poverty's Successes

Jan 8, 2014Rachel Goldfarb

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Materially Richer Today Than 50 Years Ago (The Kudlow Report)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal discusses the War on Poverty on CNBC, where he focuses on some of its successes. Mike says that War on Poverty programs have drastically reduced poverty among children and the elderly, which should be celebrated.

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Materially Richer Today Than 50 Years Ago (The Kudlow Report)

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal discusses the War on Poverty on CNBC, where he focuses on some of its successes. Mike says that War on Poverty programs have drastically reduced poverty among children and the elderly, which should be celebrated.

A Dismal New Year for the Global Economy (The Guardian)

Roosevelt Institute Senior Fellow Joseph Stiglitz says that despite a few signs of economic improvement around the world, we should still be concerned about the ways that market economies across the globe are failing to create opportunity for most citizens.

Obama to Name 5 'Promise Zones' for Assistance (USA Today)

David Jackson reports on the creation of "Promise Zones," troubled neighborhoods that will receive targeted assistance to improve education, housing, and public safety. The plan involves working with government and businesses to attack poverty on a local level.

Connecticut Sick-Leave Law Has Little Impact on Employers: Study (WSJ)

Joseph de Avila looks at a study from the Center for Economic and Policy Research examining the effects of the CT law, which was the first paid-sick leave measure in the U.S. Preliminary findings show that only 10% of employers had payroll costs increase by 3% or more.

Rauner Wants to Roll Back Minimum Wage (NBC Chicago)

Mark W. Anderson writes that Bruce Rauner, the Republican candidate for Governor in Illinois, thinks that the state's $9.25 per hour minimum wage isn't "competitive." While many politicians are discussing raising minimum wages, he wants to return Illinois's to $7.25.

Investors Are Chastened. That’s A Good Thing. (ProPublica)

Jesse Eisinger says that the lack of enthusiasm for the stock market's record highs are a sign that the public has learned not to trust the stock market as a measure of the economy's success. Instead, it's a reminder that the recovery hasn't reached most Americans.

Warren, Coburn Push for Increased Transparency on Settlements (The Nation)

George Zornick reports on a new bill from Senators Warren and Coburn that would require federal agencies to provide full disclosures of how much corporations are actually paying in fines. Corporations write off large amounts in their taxes, and the Senators think the public should know how much.

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